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Full text of "Antioch News 02/14/1992"

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For ALL the local news! Call (708) 223-8161 for home delivery 



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Liiii^ 



After the flowers and 
J^)tia!^ lace what is love? 

See Page 15 



At Home 




Compaflf'" 
creates adaptatio 
of Near Eastern 
carpets. 



Wolves 



Aiitbi-':, 



^^^ DHBBcftie wolf 
, •« returned to , 
county? Should it? 



See Page 29^ | See Page 27 



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I 

Antioch ]\^ 



mmi lQ/28/92 **C-5 

AMTIuCK TOWilSHIF LIBRARV 

757 MAIN STREET 

Antioch IL 69082 




(D1992-ASchroeder Publication 



VOL.106-NO. 7 



ANTIOCH, FEBRUARY 14, 1992 



ONE SECTION-56 PAGES 



500 PER COPY 






T 



any apartments called bad for village 



by JOSEPH SOULAK 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Changes arc coming in Ihc Antioch 
zoning ordinance. The three-year under- 
taking will be completed in about four 
months, says Village Atty. Kenneth 
Clark. 

At least two major changes could af- 
fect builders and owners of apartments. 

Both arc being pushed by Trustee 
Donald Amundsen, a 15-ycar veteran of 
the village board. 



First, he doesn't think apartments 
should be built over commercial build- 
ings, especially service stations and liquor 
stores or taverns. The existing code allows 
this. "We also could have a commercial 
building with stores on the lower level 
and 12 to 13 apartments above," he said. 

Trustee Marilyn Shncflug, who is in- 
volved in the zoning code update, isn't 
saying how Amundsen's concern is treated 
in the revision. The code is in its third 
draft 



Not affected, she said, are apartments 
in the one-half mile downtown area. Ex- 
isting apartments above these stores and 
businesses will be encouraged. 

"Studies show this kind of occupancy 
helps with the stability of downtown," 
she said. Not only do such living quarters 
bring people downtown, it keeps them 
there. Rents building owners receive help 
offset other building costs, reducing street- 
level square-foot costs. This results in 
fewer vacancies, she said. 




Another change Amundsen would like 
to see is reducing the density for 
apartments from 2,500 for one unit to 
3,600 square fccL The cuncnt code allows 
up to 20 units per acre. The number 
would drop to 12 under Amundsen's 
proposal. 

"This was an election issue three years 
ago," he said when Mayor Robert Wilton 
and trustees Larry Hanson and Shineflug 
were added lo the board. 

Residents were concerned about the 
new apartment complex on Anita St. and 
the soon-to-be built one in Antioch 
Manor North. "The feeling three years 
ago is that the village has too many 
apartments with high densities," Amund- 
sen said. "I still believe the people feel 
that way." 

The Antioch trustee advances this pro- 
posal annually. It got nowhere until an 
early February meeting. The village board 
reluctantly agreed to include his sugges- 
tions in final deliberations on zoning code 
changes. 

"I'm 57 years old," the veteran trustee 
said. "I realize I may not live forever. 
Thai's why I am trying again," he said of 
the three years the revision has been un- 
derway. "It's time to quit talking and do 
something." 

Amundsen agrees his proposal to re- 
duce apartment density may not win great 
favor among some trustees and developers, 
but he is firmly convinced it will benefit 
Antioch of the future. 
(Continued on Page 8) 



INSIDE 

•Editorial........ 10-11 

Republicans baring their knuckles. 
History of Valentine's Day 

JDLi.!)lilC/5o...*(.*...**.«.*i«*^0**^Q 

Inventor stresses soccer safety 

•Obituaries......,..........„..36 

•Classified.... .36-44 

uLJUrLo«ii..***t.*t**.*..*..«fxtJ'*^0 

Girl's Hoops start playoffs 



Be Mine 

Jon Cole takes a break from hammerin' to share a Valentine wish with Danielle 
Engler, sparking her glee. The toddlers attend Peppermint Slick Pre-School.— 
Photo by Claudia M. Lenart 




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5 speed, air, 6 cyl., cass. 



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Lealtier. loaded, very clean car 



'89 BUICiSi^i '89 BUICK LESABRE 

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Aulo., »l^ mi, c«3S., B .cyi„* alum. 

wheals, nice Laredo. ;;. ; ■ ,, '-'.'■.;„; 



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Rod, air, cass,, one owner, great lor , 
school or tralnl. 



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Auto., air, very clean car, great lor 
son or daugtiter. 



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SUPER CAB -. 

Long bad, aulo., nir, o'a*' lof haul- Bll 
Ing or work. I j.) 

SmAPCO III 



'88 HONDA ACCORD LXI 1 '88 BUICK USABRE 

Power sunrool, ..uto., air, this will | LlMITED.Incrodlb|o car, 34.000 ml., 
soil real last. I one owner, lealhar.wowr- 



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Bed, hot, 5 speed, cruise, power win 
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'89 BUICK REAHA 

Loaded, leather, only 24,000 miles, 
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'88 MAIDA RX-7 G.T.V. 

,Black^ 5 speed, only 28,000 miles.* , 
very sharp car. 



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LAZER TURBO 

5 speed, povyer locks, windows, mir- 
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2 Lakeland Nowspapors 
: 6GCoqii/)FI bue^j 



Friday, February 14, 1992 

>r.'i ,P>i X i.lfttit)l , (UMi 1 






! 









Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



A 



i 




Lake 
ounty 

At A 
Glance 




"People before my generation 
decided to wipe out the wolf, I 
thini< it's the responsibility of 
this generation to bring them 
back/ 

—Sheila Cameron, 
Fremont Twp. resident 



Depke, Behr meet 
in first board debate 

GURNEE— First in a series of 
debates for County Board candidates 
running in the March 17 primary will be 
Wednesday, Feb. 19. It will be at the 
Warren-Newport Twp. Library, 224 N. 
O'Plainc Rd., from 7 to 8:30 p.m. 
Candidates on the forum sponsored by the 
League of Women Voters are incumbent 
Robert Depke and challenger Richard 
Behr. Debates will be held in all of the 
23 board districts where there arc contests 
through Wednesday, March 1 1. 

Lincolnshire gets 
$3.6 mil for hall 

LINCOLNSHIRE— The Village of 
Lincolnshire received a below market rate 
interest rate loan for $3.6 million for 
construction of a new Administrative and 
Public Safety Center for the village, Feb. 
11. The check was presented to 
Lincolnshire Mayor Barbara LaPiana by 
bank president Saul Binder. The new 
village building is expected to be 
completed in early 1993. The below 
market interest rate was provided by the 
bank as a public service to the village. 
The agreement is for interest rates of 
6.125 percent for five years of the loan 
and 6.5 percent for the remaining ten 
years. The new building will take the 
village into the 21st Century according to 
LaPiana. 

Residents to make 
final stand on tower 

LAKE ZURICH— Maps and charts 
can explain facts and figures but not 
necessarily answer all the questions, 
including the value of aesthetics. That's 
the consensus of residents that attended 
Tuesday's special meeting of the Lake 
Zurich Board of Trustees. That meeting 
provided residents an opportunity to find 
out the facts used by the board in reaching 
a decision last fall to site a water lower in 
Paulus Park. The water tower is needed to 
increase water supplies and water pressure 
on the village's northwest side. The 
meeting came after an ordinance granting 
site plan appearance to the water tower 
was approved by the village board in a 4-2 
vote, Feb. 3. That vole was vetoed by 
Mayor James Kay, which means that the 
board will vote on the measure again at 
their next meeting, Feb. 18. Residents 
vow to make one final stand to fight the 
placement of the tower in the village's 
biggest and most-used park at that 
meeting. 



Water agency will 
start director hunt 

LAKE BLUFF— Mayor Stephen 
Graf, who serves as chairman of the 
Central Lake County Joint Action Water 
Agency, has been named temporary 
executive director to succeed the late Paul 
Ncal, who died Jan. 22. Discussion of a 
search for a new director will be among 
the topics at the board''s Wednesday, Feb. 
22, meeting. Administrative Assistant 
Melanie Van Heirseele, who is handling 
the day-to-day operations, esdmated it wiU 
be two or three months before a new 
director is hired. The agency will begin 
providing Lake Michigan water to 13 
Lake County communities in May as 
part of a $100 million public works 
project, the largest in Lake County 
history. 

Gun control law 
quickly shot down 

VERNON HILLS— An ordinance 
requiring own^s of firearms to lake a five- 
hour safety course and obtain a permit has 
been rejected by ihc village board. Viola- 
tors would have been subject to a $50 to 
$500 per day fine. Gun owners besieged 
trustees with objections following an ear- 
lier 4-2 vote for consideration. Objectors, 
many of them National Rifle Association 
members, thronged a Feb. 10 village 
board meeting at which trustees failed to 
second a motion for passage. Instead, a 
voluntary safety course will be imple- 
mented. The ordinance is being pushed by 
Mayor Barbara Williams in the wake of 
last October's shooting deaths of two 
Libertyville High School students, one of 
them from Vemon Hills. 

Saturday is last 
day to register 

LAKE COUNTY— Special voter 
registration hours will be offered this 
weekend by villages, townships and 
groups such as the League of Women 
Voters, This is a countywide effort to 
sign up voters for the Tuesday, March 17 
primary. Last day to register is Tuesday, 
Feb. 18. Persons not registered cannot 
vote in the primary. Registrants must 
provide two proofs of their current ad- 
dress; i.e. utility bills, imprinted check, 
rent receipt, etc. They also must have 
lived at their current address for 30 days 
and be 18 years of age. For the location 
and hours of the nearest place to register, 
call the Lake County Clerk's office at 
(708)360-3610. 

Winners named in 
Chain fishing derby 

CHAIN O'LAKES— The 32nd Annual 
Chain O' Lakes Ice Fishing Derby 
sponsored by the Northern Illinois 
Conservation Club had a smaller turnout 
than usual due to a perception that the ice 
wasn't Ihick enough. However, the event 
was supported by many local fishermen 
who had a good time despite the cold 
temperatures. There were winners in 10 
species categories for both largest and 
smallest The winners were: Muskie — large 
and small. 32.6-inche8, James Bridges of 
Momcnce; Northern Pike — large, 31.6 
inches. Bob Bucnzli of McHcniy and small, 
25-inches. Tom Kniegcr of Aniioch; 
Walleye — large and small, 17-inches, Dan 
Hucker of AntJoch; Largemouth Bass — 
large, 19.8-inches, Robert E. Lcmke, 
Antioch and small, 16. 2-incchcs, T.J. Foss, 
Wonder Lake; Catfish— large, 24.5-inchcs, 
Dan Hucker and small, 4-inchcs, Dan Duffy 
of McHenry; Croppie — large, 14.5-inchcs, 
John Medvd, Mundelein and small, 4.9- 
inchcs, Ernie Slauik, Antioch;; Striped 
Bass— largc,12.75-inchcs, Alan Cook, 
Chicago and small, 3.6-inchcs. Keith 
Rogalski of Elgin; Perch— large, 10.8- 
inches, Anthony W. Geskc of Gumcc and 
small, 3.3-inchcs, Derrick Brown of 
Berkeley; Bullhead — large, 13.8-inchcs, 
John Kctjen of Union and small, 2.3-inchcs, 
Patty Radtke of Trevor, Wis; Blucgill— 
large, 8.75 inches. Bill Brown of Round 
Lake Park and small, 2.S-inches. Mark 
Manisco of Bloomingdale. Winner of die 
grand prize raffie, a trip to Reno, Nevada, 
was Chris Larson of Ml Prospect 



Doctors sued over 
death of Dan Dreyer 

LAKE VILLA— Three doctors and 
Primary Health Care Family Center with 
offices in Antioch in Libertyville, are 
being sued by the estate of Daniel M. 
Dreyer, 43. for failure to diagnose heart 
disease leading to his death on Feb. 20, 
1991. The lawsuit said he was being 
treated for elevated blood {Hessure. Dreyer 
owned Awards by Kaydan of Andoch and 
was a member of the Lake Villa School 
board for 2-1/2 years until his death. 
Waukegan Atty. Patrick Salvi, who is 
representing the family, said an 
undetermined amount of money will be 
soughL 

Kempf resigns 
water agency post 

FOX LAKE — Charles Kempf has 
resigned from the Chain Ol^akes Fox 
River Waterway Management Agency 
board of directors. Kempf, who leaves 
with two years remaining in his second 
four-year term, cited the time demands of 
his Lake Petite resort as die reason for his 
resignadon. 



Firefighters go 
after better rating 

FOX LAKE — Homeowners and 
businesses here are already enjoying the 
benefits of having a well-oiled fue-protcc- 
tion machine at die ready. To top that, the 
Fox Lake Hre Protection District and the 
Fox Lake Fire Department are going after 
a better insurance rating, which would 
translate into more money saved by 
homeowners and businesses. The fire- 
fighting groups are currently meeting with 
officials from the Insurance Services Of- 
fice (ISO), which sets die ratings individ- 
ual insurance companies use when deter- 
mining premiums. 

Man dies following 
accident at Wilmot 

WILMOT— A 30-year-old Illinois 
man died Feb. 10 following an accident at 
the Wilmot Mountain skiing center when 
he struck a lift support Identification was 
pending notificadon of the next of kin. 
The victim was taken to a Kenosha 
hospital by the Salem Rescue Squad for 
an accident injury and died. This follows 
by two weeks the deaUi of a girl in her 
late teens after a skiing accident 




ur best 
5efense 
against a 

eart 

attack is 
a great 




Heart disease Is a lough competitor. Every 32 seconds it 
claims another Cie-making il the number one cause ol death 
In America. 

Fortunately, you have a good defense against a hearl attack: 
prevention through early detection. Thai's why, as a special 
service to this community, the Heart Center ot Lake County 
located at Saint Therese-Medical Center Is ottering a heart 
screening for '39. Designed to identify your cardiac risk 
taclors, this screening includes: 



•Heart Rtness Test 
•HDL and LDL cholesterol 
•Total cholesterol/HDL ratio 
•Total blood cholesterol 



•Blood pressure 
•Triglyceride level 
•Cardiac risk far.tor analysis 




You see H's important to know the condition of your heart, 
especially if you have a family history ol heart disease. By 
having (his screening, you're taking an important step 
lowards finding out just how healthy your heart reaBy Is. 
To make an appointment or for more inlonnation, pleas© 
call (708) 360-2772. 



Saint Therese 
Medical Center 




Heart Center of Lake County 

A Division of Franciscan Sistcre Heatlli Care Corporalion 
2615 Waslringlon Sued Waukegan, illinois 60085-4988 

OlWl, S«lliniint»«Mrdlr*lCinlrT 



Friday. February U, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers :& 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



Leagee bowlers to bowl for kids' sake 



League bowlers can 
make a difference in the life 
of a child from a single 
parent home by participat- 
ing in Bowl For Kids' Sake 
during their league play. By 
collecting sponsor dona- 
tions from your friends and 
family and bowling on your 
regular bowling night, you 
can help a child in need who 
is waiting for a Big Brother 
or Big Sister, 



The bowlathon runs 
through Mid-March at An- 
tioch Lanes and Pro Shop, 
Lake's Bowl, Hawthorn 
Lanes, BerU'and Bowling 
Lanes, and Sunset Bowl. 

Call (708)360-0770 for 
different bowling centers 
and sponsor sheets. Not a 
league bowler — be a Com- 
munity Challenge Days 
bowler by forming a team 
with your friends. A pledge 



sheet totaling at least $50 is 
the only price of admission 
to bowl and party at one of 
the Community Challenge 
Days: March 8 at Hawthorn 
Lanes in Vernon Hills and 
Feb. 23 at Bertrand BowUng 
Lanes in Waukcgan from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. There will 
be raffle prizes, pizza and 
drinks for participants. 

But wherever you 
choose to bowl, everyone 



raising $50 receives a T- 
shirt and an entry in the 
Grand Prize drawing for a 
cruise. For each additional 
$50 raised, bowlers receive 
another chance in the Grand 
Prize drawing. There will 
also be a prize for the most 
money raised American 
Airline tickets for two to 
anywhere in the continental 
United States. 

The sole purpose of 



Bowl For Kids' Sake is to 
raise money to recruit, 
screen and train new Big 
Brothers, Big Sisters and 
couples to be matched with 
kids from single-parent 
homes needing a special 
friend. 

Major sponsors for this 
year's event are IMC Fertil- 
izer, Inc., U.S. Cable of 
Lake County, Allstate and 
American Airlines. The 



following supporters have 
already accepted the 
"challenge" and will be 
forming teams: IMC 
Fertilizer, Allstate, W.R. 
Grace Dearborn, First Mid- 
west Bank, Wal-Mart, 
Exxon Chemical, Village of 
Antioch, Walgreens, OMC, 
Illinois Bell and MacLean 
Fogg. 

Call (708)360-0770 to 
register. 



I 




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as K9 CS @3 
SALE 

TODAY THROUGH TUE. 
FEBRUARY 1 8th 



QFREEMAN ir] I L'EGGS i!||TAMPAX lEJi SUNDOWN |E| 300 CT. 



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•EXPIRES 2/18/92 




HEET «• 



BUY 1 
GET1 

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STYLES 
^EXPIRES 2/18/92 

SYLVAN lA 
LIGHT BULBS 





NATURAL 

CSOOMG 
100 

ooMreDwunl 



21 SUPER AaSORSANCY 
•EXPIRES 2/18/92 



500 M6 




COTTON 
SWABS 

( 

EA. 




la: 



WINDSHIELD 
SOLVENT 




4 PACK 

60-70-I00 WAH I 

Sale 1.49 

LcniyUHn 
Rebate ...'1. 00 

Coft 

After MAt 



^EXPIRES 2/18/92 

MIUC 

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Jk\ Re*>«e 



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REG. 
1,1 «* 

SALEj 



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740-0660 



INOnCE TO OUR CUSTOMERS; We resave the right lo limit quantities, II a product is not available, Pcny wflD issue a ralncheck or sUjSitutc a similar product. Some items nay not be available In al stores. Liquor prices vMfsA. to Federal exdse lax 
4 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



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Power-line foes ask politicos for help 



by JOSEPH SOULAK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Two state legislators and several 
would-be legislators were asked this week 
for their help in stopping Commonwealth 
Edison from constructing a 138,000-volt 
power transmission line between Antioch 
and Lake Villa. 

They were urged at a town meeting of 
the West Millmorc Community Assn. to 
enact a moratorium against such high- 
voltage power transmission lines. 

Only Slate Rep. Robert Churchill (R- 
Lake Villa) offered any help. He promised 
to introduce legislation to study the effects 
of electric magnetic field (EMF) emis- 
sions. "If the studies prove the things 
you people charge, then we can stop the 
construction of lines carrying this volt- 
age," the 10-year legislator said. 

Residents from Lake Villa to Loon 
Lake and Antioch organized as People and 
Citizens Together (PACT) oppose Com 
Ed's plans based on concerns for health, 
safety, aesthetics and property values. 
They say EMF causes cancer, causes 
leukemia in children age 1-5, causes birth 
deformities in pregnant women and a host 
of other maladies. 



They admit EMF is a 15-20 year old 
pFoblcm and no one rcally knows its effect 
on humans. "It will take 10 to 20 years 
before the effect on hiunans is known," 
one member said at a Feb. 10 meeting of 
West Miltmore homeowners at the State 
Bank of Antioch in Lindenhurst "I don't 
want to put my family at risk for that 
period of time." 

Churchill said a matter of such concern 
may be resolved in one or two years. But 
he's willing to try. 

State Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis (R-Zion) 
said she spoke to Ronald Crawford, dis- 
trict manager for the Waukegan district of 
the Commonwealth Edison Co. "I told 
him to do this construction in the safest 
manner possible. If it costs $17-1/2 mil- 
lion, go ahead and spend it," I said. 

To run the new line underground 
would cost up to $20-million, according 
to preliminary company estimates. Cost 
of keeping them above ground is $6.3 
million. Putting part of the lines below 
ground near population centers such as 
Lake Villa and below ground in the unin- 
coiporated areas of Antioch and Lake Villa 
townships would cost about $10 million. 



HU^^—.J,- ,.„-. 



HABlABidB 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Lakeland (usps 027-o80) 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Oflloo ol Publication: 30 South WhHney SI., Gmyslako, IL 
60030. Phono (708) 223-8161. 

Poblishod weekly. 9<«»nd das* postage paid at Gmyslako. 
IL 60030. 

Mail Suhscfipllon Rates; '16.50 Per Yoai by Mail paid in 
odvanco (n Lake. Cook Kenosha and McHennf CounlleB; 
ebewhofa *22.0a Per Year by Mail paid in advancs. 

Poalmaster: Send address changes lo Antioch News- 
Repotlof. 30 South Whitney Street. P.O. Box 268, 
Qraystake, Itlinab 60030. 

(708) 223-81 61 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Gray slake Times 
Fox Lake Press 
Gurnea Press 



Vernon Hills News 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

Ubertyville News 

Lindenhurst News 

Norlh Chicago Tribune 

Warren-Newport Press 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder- 1904 -1936 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

PiAlishof/Piesidonl 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

JILLDePASOUALE CLAUDIA LENART AW IL ROBERTS 

WOlDArAliMU SHARON ZASADIL ELIZABETH E6ERT 
Accom ^s W^' Cofflpos'w t^. Pti6JieBablwis4ij/tjthgMy. 



As now planned, the high-voltage 
lines would be buried one-fourth mile 
south of Pleviak School in Lake Villa, 
remain 5 to 6 feet underground through 
Lake Villa and resurface along the Wis- 
consin Central Railroad right of way north 
of Cedar Village retirement center. From 
there the lines would connect to a new 
substation on the west shore of Loon 
Lake annexed last year by the village of 
Antioch. 

The new lines will serve a growing 
area of six-plus square miles. "This sys- 
tem will improve the quality and reliabil- 
ity of Com Ed's service," Geo-Karis said. 
"That may be important after years of 
overloads and outages." 

"Antioch annexed the land when told 
by Com Ed there was no alternative," said 
Trustee Marilyn Shineflug, who attended 
the meeting. "We thought this was better 
than a possible alternative of three 45-kv 
lines. This gave us some control, but we 
didn't ask for the substation." Had Antioch 
not annexed the site it would have re- 
mained in unincorporated Antioch Twp. 
"That possibly would have meant even 
higher voltage lines," she said. 

PACT members at the meeting called 
the lack of possible choices another of 
Com Ed's "lies." They agreed to the need 
for upgraded electrical service. They sug- 
gested Com Ed purchase a 500- or 1,000- 
foot right of way on which to construct 
the lines. Above or below ground, they 
said the effects of EMF are almost the 
same. 

Barbara Oilschlager of Lake Villa, a 
candidate for the County Board, said she 
has "no problem with standing back and 
taking a look at this plan." She said help 
can be provided at various levels of sta^ 
and local government, but she was not 
sure what the County Board could do. 

Members of the audience disagreed 
with her, saying incumbent County Board 



member Suzi Schmidt of Lake Villa has 
been extremely helpful. Schmidt did not 
attend. She was in CaJifomia following 
the death of her vacationing father on Feb. 
1. 

Supv. James Fields of Antioch was 
mentioned as being unconcerned about the 
effects of the new line and EMF in his 
township, which includes Loon Lake. 

Dennis Winn of Waukegan, a candidate 
for Geo-Karis' senate seat in the 31st 
DisL, said electric rates will increase with 
more conditions imposed on this project 
"That is the price people may be willing 
to pay." He noted that Chicago-area elec- 
tric rates arc the second or third highest in 
the nation. "There is a lot of mismanage- 
ment at Com Ed that first has to be ad- 
dressed," he said. 

Waukegan Auy. Paul Chervin, a third 
senate candidate in the 31st Dist, called 
for the election of Illinois Commerce 
Commission members. "That would pre- 
vent this type of Com Ed ideas," he said. 
He also suggested forming a special ser- 
vice district to tax property within the 
immediate area to pay for the Com Ed 
plan. This idea was rejected because the 
electricity will serve customers in a wide 
area 



School cookbook 

The Antioch Grade School Cook- 
book entitled "Celebrating Our Roots" 
is now ready for distribution. The 
cookbook is a collection of favorite 
recipes that have been handed down 
through the years. The contributors are 
the families, teachers and residents of 
the town. It is the "Official Cook- 
book" of Antioch's Centennial Cele- 
bration. For information on obtaining 
this "piece of history" call Shirley 
Boring at (708)395-2988. 



Friday. February 14. 1992 



Lakoland Nowspap«n 5 



Congratulations DARE grads 



Following is a list of 
Drug Awareness ResisUincc 
Education (DARE) gradu- 
ates offered by the Antioch 
PoliceDcpt. 
W.C. Petty School 

Monica Daschc, Nate Garden, 
Mall Chinski, Kevin Collins, 
Amber Dusak, J.J. Edwards, 
Krislina Emody, Fred Fcliingcr, 
ERic Green, Samangiha Griffin, 
Kelly Haley, Luke Haley, Jenny 
Hatcher, Tom Jchlicka, Brad 
Marchildon, Rebecca Miranda, 
Maureen Moran, Ricky Rivas, 
Tom Schncllc, Jim Scribcm. J.T. 
Stone, Lcena Ultsch, Gina Ycko. 

Bryan Boring, Paul Ca- 
vanaugh. Kenneth Cichon, 
Steven Coolbaugh, Dcna Cucnco, 
Scott Dalton, Nicole Daugheny, 
Shaun Dexhcimer, Lindy Gaylor, 
Kristy Goclz, Vanessa Golladay, 
Jennifer Grolh, Kimberly 
Hansen, Erika Johnson, Rachel 
Kolrba, Jacob Manning, Ndia 
Pawlowski, Nicole Ring, Lauren 
Rudck, CaraSchrcy, Teresa 
Walsh, Jamie Wismcr and 
Sabrina Yuusif. 



Paul Barlcll, John Bcstlcr, 
Amanda Calvert, Marc Colatrino, 
Dcnisc Colby, Jake Crfamond, 
Rhonda Dcckert, William Dcl'vc, 
Joshus Groctsema, Carina Ilaucn- 
slcin, Sara Hilgcr, Kristcn Hun- 
garland, Brian Klinzing, Lyndi 
Kulidgc, Drew Lang, Katie La- 
Plantc, Bridget Martens, An- 
thony Moniclconc, Jeffrey Raja- 
maki, Edward Rotchford, John 
Sarioris, Timothy Walker, Adam 
Slakroczymski. 

Alex Bcrgcr, Becky Btrren, 
Sara Cashmorc, Jitlian Klcan, 
Woylon Cummings, Meghan 
Dyer, Laura Eaton, Matt Embiy, 
Andy Evcrding, Michael Fischer, 
Heidi Haag, Timothy Hahn, 
Chrisiin Iluspcn, Justin Laucr, 
Gene Lindom, Timothy Phelps, 
Paul Pirbcanac, Corey Punko, 
Natalie Richtcr, Esther Schcurcr, 
Mark Skorrcwski, and Lauren 
Slcinburg. 

Grass Lake School 

Rick Anderson, Mike Boer- 
man, Tony Bryson, Jenny 
Cardis, Tia Chinn, Abby Clark, 



St. Peter board 
petitions available 



On April 30» three 
members of the school 
board (Adricnne Dcitz, Ann 
Smith and Alberla Petros- 
ko) will have completed 
their terms. St. Peier Parish 
consequently will vote for 
their replacements. 

To provide for a smooth 
transition in selecting their 
replacements, the school 
board has developed and 
adopted the following pro- 
cedures for nominating, 
qualifying and electing 
members of the parish 
school board. Terms are for 
a period of three years. 
Members may serve a max- 
imum of two elccicd terms. 

The election committee 
will be appointed annually 
by the school board chair- 
man and will include ex-of- 
ficio members of the board 
and board members. 

The election will beheld 
on April 26. 

Voting will lake place 
after each Mass (including 
the 5:30 p.m. Mass on 
April 25). All adult parish- 
ioners or parents of St. Pe- 
ter School children arc eli- 
gible to vote. Parish rolls 
will be used to determine 
voter eligibility. Election 
committee will be responsi- 
ble to appoint election 
judges. 

A simple majority will 
be sufficient to elect a 
member. In the event of a 
tie, a runoff election will be 
held on the following Sun- 
day. Results of any runoff 
election will be announced 
on the Sunday after the run- 
off. 

Election results will be 
published and announced on 
Sunday, May, 3. 

Elected members will be 
seated at the first regularly 

scheduled meeting after the 
election, i.e. in May. 
Ballots will be made 



available in Fr. Frawlcy 
(church) Hall after each 
Mass. 

Prospective members 
must qualify according to 
the school board require- 
ments as follows: reside in 
the community for at least 
six months; be a parish 
member or parent of a St. 
Peter school child; and must 
be a minimum of 18 years 
old. No person employed by 
the school may serve on the 
board. 

Candidates for board 
membership must submit 
their application petition 
signed by at least 10 parish- 
ioners or parents of St. Pe- 
ter School children to the 
principal no later than 3 
p.m. Tuesday, March .10. 

Application petition 
forms will be available at 
the school office beginning 
Feb. 1. Names will appear 
of the ballot in the order 
petitions arc filed. 

The election committee 
will be responsible for cer- 
tification of all applicants. 
The election committee will 
accept all application peti- 
tions. The election commit- 
tee will determine eligibili- 
ty and acceptance of candi- 
dates to the school board. 

Announcement of quali- 
fying candidates will be 
made at the regular school 
board meeting on March 12. 

In the event a candidate 
docs not qualify, he/she will 
be advised of the decision as 
well as the reason of his/her 
failure to obtain certifica- 
tion prior to March 12. 

Any candidate will have 
the opportunity to question 
the election committee 
should he/she fail to obtain 
certification and present his/ 
her case in favor of certifi- 
cation prior to March 12, 

The election committee 
will be dissolved after com- 
pletion of the election. 



Mat Daniclson, Ryan Dunfrund, 
Tami Edclman, Amber Gore, 
Adam Ilillcr, Candi Kasprzak, 
Jcny Konstans, Brigcttc Leonard, 
Jillian Litchford, Kristi 
Lochhcad, Lori Locf, Kyle Milo- 
vanovic, Kristin Modonski, Jcr- 
amy Morgan, Tcri Mozal, Travis 
Pinkowski, Steve Sansone, 
ShcUcy Schaff, Steve Spencer, 
and Josh White. 

Emmons School 

William Adams, Sarch Am- 
t>cr, Luke Anderson, Andrew Bcn- 
ncckc, Angel Blanchclle, Angel 
Blanchctte, Tiffany Cashmore, 
Cory Cybul, Floyd Davis, 
Christopher Dicmer, Bill Erslcr, 
Eric Fmackc, IjcsUc Gillengertcn, 
Courtney Gray, Dauma Hazners, 
Rcncc Hcrsh bcrgcr, Ian Konralh, 
James Koppa, Kelly Mi- 
hovilovich, Michael O'Donnell, 
Jcannctlc Olson, Liana Rothcr- 
mel. Justin Schiftcr, Kelly 
Williams, Tracy Brylinkc. 



Name students to Univ. 
of Wis. fall dean^s list 



The Univ. of Wisconsin- 
Parkside has announced the 
names of the students in- 
cluded on (he dean's list for 
academic achievement dur- 
ing the fall semester. 

Those having an aca- 
demic grade point average of 
3.9 to 4.0 are: 



Jacalyn Kalmes, Lori 
Slager, Karen Williamson, 

Lisa Lindgren of Lake 
Villa; John Miller, Marilyn 

Hlinak, and Marlcen Bozi- 
mowski of Lindenhurst; 

Michael Lawrence and 
Brenda Betke'of Antioch. 




Now and then 



The new year has brought new officers for the Antioch Lions Club. John 
Puffin (right) Is the new president for the term 1992. Standing next to him are 
past president Immediate Chuck Cermak (center) and district governor Joe 
Klodzinskl (left). Club members are preparing for the pig roast they will 
sponsor in conjunction with July fireworks during Antloch's centennial 
celebration. 






I 
I 



Doctors 




Bonifacio M. Rivera, MD, is a family practice specialist 
who has more than 15 years of experience caring for 
families' healthcare needs. Dr. Rivera's North Point office 
is located in Antioch at 800 N. Main Street Please call 
708 • 872 . ^982 today to make an appointment. Or visit 
the office— walk in appointments are welcome. 



, Family Practice 

' Elaine Ferguson, MD 
■ Samyon Maslovsky, MD 
: Bonifacio Rivera, UD | 
Peter Senator©, MD 




Dentistry 

Jeffrey Cohen, DDS 
Amold Gorchow, DDS :| 

Chiropractic Medicine 
;, Jeffrey Bergin. DC 

Podiatry 

] Coleen Napolitano, DPM.i 
■" Lee Tisa, DPM '' 




Pediatric Oncology 

Denis Miller, UD 



Nutrition 

Robert lafelice. RD, MS 

Obstetrics Sc 
Gynecology 

Sudevi Thaker, MD 

Arthrltiaiphs 
Orthopedics Sk 
Pain Control 

Ronald M. Klat^, OD 



-j^. 



Mi'jm 



Now in Antioch: 

The doctors you've been loolcing for. 

Please call 708*872«8982 

Antioch • Chicago • Gurnee • Lindenhurst • Zion 



NORTH POINT 



M 


E D 1 C A L 


D 


E N T A L 


C 


ENTER 



-i' 






6 Lokoland Newspapers 



Frldoy.Febfu'ary 14, 1992 



m^$i* 



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Bobby's balloon takes 
voyage to Michigan 



by LIZ SCHMEHL 
(708)395-5380 
Special voyage 

On Jan. U, little 
Bobby Klean, his big 
brother, Ricky, and big 
sister, Tracy, released a he- 
lium balloon from Anti- 
och. Naturally they won- 
dered how far it would 
travel and if anyone would 
ever discover where it had 
come from. They did not 
have to wait long for an- 
swers to these questions as 
a short time after releasing 
the balloon, they received a 
communique from a nice 
lady in Sparta, Mich, in- 
forming them she had 
found the balloon. 

The very next day, on 
Jan. 12, Diane Sessions 
was taking her dog, Lucky 
for a walk. The Sessions 
live in Sparta in a fme 
home situated on six acres 
of land, bordering, 220 
acres of other vacant prop- 
erties. Lucky and his mas- 
ter were tramping through 
the thick underbrush and 
they noticed the balloon 
lodged on some shrubbery. 
Upon further investigation, 
they were astonished to 
discover it had reached them 
all the way from Antioch, 
many, many, many, miles 
away. Diane was so excited 
over this happening that 
she wrote little Bobby a 
note informing him when 
and how she found his 
well-traveled balloon. In 
turn, little Bobby was so 
excited to hear about the 
voyage of the balloon that 
his mom, Margie said he 
was left speechless (a real 
rarity for bubbly little 
Bob). 

Emmons school 

The following items 
were discussed or action 
taken at the Jan. 21 meet- 
ing of the Emmons Board 
of Education. The board 
accepted the resignation of 
Dr. Charles Stephens; the 
board heard an educational 
presentation on the Junior 
High Ace Program; policy 
no. 500.70 on Drug and 
Alcohol Free Workplace 
was adopted; projected en- 
rollment figures were dis- 
cussed; the board received 
an up date from the Steer- 
ing Committee; board ap- 
proved the 1992 Assurances 
and School Improvement 
Plan; March 2 was set to 
discuss board self-evalua- 
tion; the board appointed 
Edcr, Riedel and Company 
for auditors for the next 
three years; set a date of 
Feb. 17 lo interview candi- 
dates for the board vacancy. 
Also Emmons School 
will once again participate 
in the Jump- Rope for Heart 
Program sponsored by the 
American Heart Assn. 
Kevin Butler of the 
Chicago Bears is the 
spokesman for this pro- 
gram and is scheduled to 
visit Emmons School 
sometime this month. - 
Belated Birthday 

Little Brittany Harrison 
turned seven years on Feb. 
3. In celebration of her 
special day, Brittany re- 
ceived a shiny new bicycle, 
an outing to see the movie 



"Beauty and the Beast" and 
a fun bowling excursion. 
Happy belated seventh from 
Lizaid and reacfcrs. 
Centennial Invitation 
In late June, Antioch 
will be having a Centennial 
Celebration Parade. The 
communities surrounding 
the Village proper have 
been invited to participate 
in the parade. As you 
know, there is a lot of fine 
history in the Grass Lake 
area of Antioch. Wouldn't 
it be wonderful to partici- 
pate in the parade with a 
float showing the past and 
present histories that are 
abundant in the Grass Lake 
Community? 



Hometown 
Goodies 



All that is needed to 
make this a reality is one 
or two chairpcople willing 
to spearhead the function. If 
you are interested in 
serving the Grass Lake 
Community in this 
manner, please contact 
Grass Lake School and they 
will put you in touch with 
John Ruffin, the parade co- 
ordinator, and also provide 
you with the name of an 
individual who is willing 
to help in the planning. 
The number at the school 
is (708)395-1550. You can 
ask to talk with Supt. Dr. 
Ruth Bill, or Principal 
Raymond Liss. 

Chess Club 

Once again Dave 
Tomci, the Grass Lake 
School chess coach, will be 
taking his top 17 chess 
players to a tournament in 
Aurora. The event will be 
held on Feb. 15 at Holy 
Angels School. Coach 
Tomci anticipates a strong 
showing as the team has 
been working very hard 
during chess club meetings 
and practices. Perhaps they 
will bring back another 
trophy. Good Luck, people, 
and Coach Tomei, please 
don't forget to provide us 
with the results. 

Lotus School 

Lotus School recently 
conducted their first annual 
"Student Book Swap? and 
it was a hug success. Par- 
ticipating students brought 
in a book they had finished 
an no longer wanted the 
children and save money 
too. There was an awards 
assembly held at the school 
honoring the 48 students 
who made the "Principal's 
On-A-Roir recognition for 
the second quarter grading 
period and 57 sUidents who 
earned "A" and "B" aca- 
demic achievements. Con- 
gratulations and keep up 
the good work. 
Footsteps 

Did you ever notice that 
those who claim to be your 
best friends will be the 
ones to razz you the most 
about the occasional 
bloopers you commit? Last 
year I wrote about Debbie 
Focrstcr's bingo blooper 
when she had overlooked a 



number that would have 
awarded her a good size 
jackpot. Recently, Debbie, 
her grandmother, Adeline 
Trout, friends Donna 
Schmehl and Dennis Bergl, 
went 10 play bingo. During 
the course of the evening, 
Donna took great joy in 
relating Debbie's former 
bingo blooper to grandma 
Trout and Dennis. She 
went on and on and on 
about how Debbie could 
have won "X" amount of 
dollars had she been more 
attentive to her bingo cards 
on that bingo excursion of 
the past. The picture frame 
game began, the pot was 
meaty, Donna was close, 
only two numbers to go 
and then only one. Her 
palms became sweaty, her 
heart pounded, as she 
anticipated victory. All that 
was needed was "0-65," A 
voice yelled "BINGO." 

However, it was not 
Donna's and to make mat- 
ters worse, a glance at the 
numbers board told her she 
could have won because 
"0-65" was in fact called 
several numbers prior to 

the lady yelling bingo. The 
realization of what hap- 
pened hit her hard and fast. 
Oh no, I just razzed Debbie 
all evening about her pat 
mistake and now I 
committed the same 
blooper. Boy, am I in for 
it! I Naturally Uiey will tell 
The Lizard, Naturally. I 
will be highlighted in 
"Hometown Goodies" and 
guess what. Donna natu- 
rally you were right!!! 

Dinner Dance 

The Annual Grass Lake 
School P.T.O. Dinner 
Dance will be held on Sat- 
urday, May 16, at Andres 
in Richmond. The chair 
people promise a fun 
evening for all and tickets 
will soon be on sale. As in 
the past, there will be a de- 
licious dinner with dancing 
afterwards lo the music of a 
DecJay. 




Athlete of the week 

Tammy Peters (center) of Antioch Community High School placed 15th out of 
150 bowlers at the Fenton Bowling Invitational. The First Chicago Bank of 
Antioch will make a donation to the high school scholarship fund in Peters' 
name. On the left is Coach Elliot Hoffeditz , Deborah Jackson (right) is 
presenting the check for l=irst Chicago. 



Woman*s Club prepares 
for Centennial Ball 



The Antioch Woman's 
Club is completing final 
preparations for the 
Centennial Ball celebrating 
the 100th Birthday of the 
Village of Antioch. The 
gala will be held at Mar- 
avela's in Fox Lake on Feb. 
29 — the actual date of the 
incorporation of the village. 
Co-chairpersons for the 
event are Linda Pcderscn and 
Mabel Lou Weber. 

Ticket Chairperson, 
Nancy Zitkus, and her 
committee of Laurel Dahl, 
Jean DcBoer, Sharon Old- 
enburger, Florence Peder- 
sen, Nancy Preston, Nancy 
Renmer, Ann Simbrowski, . 
Evelyn Skidmorc and 
Dorothy Ware report 
invitations have been sent 
and additional tickets arc 
available at the State Bank 
of Antioch, First National 
Bank of Antioch, First Na- 



tional Bank of Chicago. 
Antioch facility, and the 
Village Hall. Information 
on tickets and reservations 
is available from Nancy 
Zitkus at (708)395-1202. 

. ^Bcmice Cardis and Car- 
olyn Costoff, decorations 
co-chairpersons, report their 
committee of Joanne Casey, 
Jean Droegkamp, Marge 
Gaa, Rose Marie Hevrdejs, 
Norma Meicrdirk, Nancy 
Preston, Fran Priory, Bcv 
Sorenson, Susan Turner and 
Carol Wilson have been 
busy preparing decorations 
that will transform the ban- 
quet room into a centennial 
birthday festival. 

A highlight of the 
evening's program will be 
the announcement of the 
Antioch Women's Club 
Hall of Fame inductees. 
Committee Chairperson 



Edna Barr and her commit- 
tee of Fran Graff, Shirley 
Jensen, Home LaPlant, 
Eileen Lewin, Linda Pedcr- 
son, Ann St. Pierre and 
Betty Lu Williams have 
completed the selection 
process. 

Entertainment for the 
evening will be provided by 
the Waller Nechoda Trio and 
dancing to the Nighi Shift 
Orchestra will climax the 
celebration. 

Proceeds from the Cen- 
tennial Bail will be used for 
the landscaping of the park- 
ing lot on the cast side of 
Toft Ave. Plans were pre- 
sented to the Village Boanl 
and have been enthusiasti- 
cally accepted. This beauti- 
fication project will be a 
lasting gift from the 
Woman's Club for the en- 
joyment of many genera- 
tions to come. 




-J — ...] 



A I^ifcctoM'y OiAntiocii Area. CHmme'cImcs 



Gracalind Bapllit Church, 256 tda St., Antioch, III. 
Sunday School 11 a.m.. Morning Worship 11 am., Sunday 
Evoning 7 p.m. Robert Wiirams, Pastor 

First Church of Chrbt, ScUntbt & Rsading Rm., Rte. 173 
and Harden, Antioch. Phone (708) 395*1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 a.in. Wednesday, 6 
pm. 

Calvary Baptist Church, 554 Parkway, Phone (708) 395- 
3333. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday Worship 11 am. and 
7 p.m. Pastor, Rov. Lloyd G. Moss, Jr. 

St. Ignatius Eptscopal. 983 Main St. Phono (70B) 395- 
0652. Son/ico 7;30 am. Low Mass, 9:30 am. High Mass, 
Sunday School 9:30 am, 

Antioch Evangsllcal Fro« Church Tillany Rd, Phone (708) 
395-4117. Sunday School 9:30 am., Sunday Worshf) 8:15 
am. and 11 a.m., Childron's Church 11 a.m, Nursery both 
sorvicos. Awana Club, 6:30 p.,-n. Wodnosday 

SL Staphen Lutheran Church, Hillside & Rio. 59, Phone 
(706) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8 and 10:30 am. Church 
School 9:15 am., Sunday. Rev. Charles E. Miller, Pastor. 

Christian Ult Fellowship Assambltos of Qod Church, 
41625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch, Phone (70B) 395-0572. 
Sunday School (all agos) 9 am., Sunday Morning Worship 
10 B,m., Childron's Church 10 a.m,, Sunday Evoi\ing 
Worship 6:30 p,m., Wednesday Worship & Children'^ 
Prooram 7 p.m., Tues. Women's FoDowship & Bbia Study &• 
11 :30 am. Jeff Brussaly, Pastor. 




FaJlh Evanggllcal Lutheran, 1275 Main SL, Phone (708) 
395-1660, Sunday WorsKp 8 & 10:30 am., Sunday School 
925 a,m., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev, DaraW Gruen, Rev, Gregory 
Hernianson," Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 395-1664. 

Millburn Congregational United Church of Christ, Grass 
Lake Rd. at Rte. 45. Phono (708) 356-5237. Sunday service 
10 am. Children's program 10 am. Rev. Paul R, Meitzer. 
Pastor. 

United Uethodist Church of Antioch, 84S Main SL Phone 
(708) 395-1259. Summer Worship Hours 8 am. & 9:30 a.m. 
The Rev, Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor, 

St Piter's Church, 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone (708) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 8 am., Sunday 6:30, 
8, 9:30, 11 a.m, & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 5:30 p.m. Pastor 
Rev. Father Lawrence Hanley, 

Chain of Lakos Community Bible Church, 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd, Antioch Phone (708) 838-0103, Sunday 
Sen/ice 10 am. • 6 p.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church 
during morning worship. Pastor Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (UlsMurl Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rts, 59 & 132), Lake Villa. 
(708)356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 am.; 
Sunday School (3 and up) end Bble Study 9:30 am 
Rev, John Zellmer, Pastor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang FuneroD H©me of Antiochi 



KijmimmrT<aasm.Kma)jismTm)iBS:s^is^ 



Friday,Fobfuaryl4, 1992 



Lakoland Nowspapors 7 




Craft show 

Aniioch Lower Grade School will 
be the site of the Centennial Craft 
Show on April 11. The school is lo- 
cated at 817 Main St. in Antioch. 
Hours for the craft show arc 9 a.nn. to 
4 p.m. Anyone interested in a "craft 
booth" should contact Cindy Dziki at 
(708)395-5125 or Laurie Stahl at 
(708)395-2958. 

Beginning knitting 

Beginning knitting classes arc held at 
the Scout House on Wednesdays from 
7 to 9 p.m. Adults 13 years and older 
are invited to attend this class begin- 
ning Feb. 19 and ending May 13. 

The registration fee is $75 (this 
includes all supplies) and can be paid 
at the Parks and Recreation Office in 
Village Hall, 874 Main, Antioch. For 
more information, contact Carol Todd 
at (708)395-2160. 

Ribs *n' bibs 

St. Peter School in Antioch will 
be holding is annual Ribs-n-Bibs 
Dinner Saturday, Feb. 22 from 5 to 8 
p.m. in the family room of the 
school. Profits from the dinner will go 
to support the school's athletic pro- 
gram. 



Tickets, available at the door or 
from members of the athletic program, 
are $7 for adults and $4 for children 
under 12. Carry out dinners will also 
be available. 

Holmes awarded 

Rodney T. Holmes, son of Vcm 
and Joan Holmes of Aniioch has been 
awarded a two part $2,800 architectural- 
scholarship. The scholarship is toward 
his freshman year. The scholarship 
was awarded on his major grade point 
improvement. Holmes is a 1991 
graduate of Antioch Community High 
School He is majoring in architectural 
engineering, at the Milwaukee School 
of Engineering, 

Victory Lakes 

Victory Lakes, located at 1055 E. 
Grand Ave., Lindenhurst, offers an 
Alzheimer's Support Group every third 
Wednesday from 4 till 6 p.m. in the 
chapel. 

On Feb. 19, a program entitled 
"Long Term Care Insurance — ^Thc 
Answers You Need," will be conducted 
for professionals who work with older 
adults. 

For more information on any of 
these or other programs offered by 
Victory Lakes, phone (708)356-5900. 



Okay new pavilion 
for Centennial Park 



Antioch's newest park will get its own 
shelter in April or May. 

It will be a 30-foot by 60-foot pavil- 
ion with concrete floor with a dozen or 
more picnic benches underneath. 

The shelter will be purchased for 
$4,850 in kit form from an Hlinois 
manufacturer. The kit includes all lum- 
ber, nails, bolts, shingles and materials 
for on-site completion. 

The building has trusses, not arches, 
eliminating places for birds to nest or 
roost. 

Construction, including pouring the 
footings for 1.000-pound columns, will 
be bid locally. 

All costs are covered as part of a 
$25,000 budget for the new building in 
the village budget 

Delivery will take six weeks. With 



several more weeks for construction, the 
building should be in place sometime in 
April. 

This is well in advance of the village's 
100-year centennial celebration from June 
27 to July 4. Some events scheduled as 
part of that observance will be in the new 
park. 

This is the fifth park in the village. It 
is located on Anita St near Antioch Es- 
tates subdivision and contains 8.6 acres. 

The architectural style of the pavilion 
is designed to blend with the adjoining 
subdivision. 

Addition of a flreplxe at a later date is 
provided for in construction plans. This 
is one of the needs at the new park ex- 
pressed by Trustee Marilyn Shncflug. 

Other amenities at the new park are a 
children's playground and softball field. 



First National Bank of Antioch 
announces record earnings 



Ted C. Axton, president full service facility in April 



and the board of directors are 
proud to announce record 
earnings for The First Na- 
tional Bank of Antioch of 
$662,000 for 1991, an in- 



at Brookside Dr. and Grand 
Ave. (Rte. 132) just one 
mile west of Gumee Mills. 

In response to customer 
needs, the bank's Real Es- 
cr^se of 30 percent over 1^^. D^pt. also expanded it 

^"^^* services in 1991 to include 

During 1991, the First the Secondary Mortgage 

National further expanded Market as an originator of 

its services and product to Freddie Mac Loans. The 

the Gumee and Lindenhurst First National Bank of An- 

communities with the tioch originated over 

opening of a new permanent $6,000,000 in home loans, 



Apartments 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Shineflug said she has 
trouble with the density re- 
stricrion proposed by 
Amimdsen. 

Amundsen senses a dif- 
ferent attitude in the com- 
munity. "I realize compli- 
cated rewrites of compli- 



serving customers from 
northern Illinois and south- 
cm Wisconsin. 



ACHS senior participates 
in scholarship competition 



by RHONDA VINZANT 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Like many high school seniors, Crystal 
Cox, races to the mailbox each day after 
school to check for a special letter that 
will determine her fuUire. 

The Antioch High School senior 
participated in an annual honors 
scholarship competition at MacMurray 
College in downstate Jacksonville in 
January and is eagerly waiting the results 
which arc due by the end of the month. 

Crystal, the daughter of John and Chris 
Cox of Antioch, took part in the 12th 
annual MacMurray scholarship 
competition, which pitted academically- 
talented students against one another for 
two full-tuition and 18 half- tuition 
scholarships to the college. Typically 
about 100 students participate annually on 
weekends in November and January. 

"I really liked the campus there. The 
people were very firicndly," remarked Cox. 
"I liked the small size of the school where 
everyone seems to know each other." 

MacMurray's fall enrollment was 680 
students nearly half the size of Antioch 
High School. 

During the scholarship competition. 
Cox was required to write a Icnglhy essay 
to demonstrate her writing skills which 
was evaluated by college English and 
journalism professors. The following day 
each participant had two interviews apiece 
with panels of three college and 
community representatives. "I thought I 
did very well on the essay," Cox 
remarked. "I was a little nervous during 
the interviews but thought I did pretty 
well." The interviews focus on the 
student's impressions of MacMurray and 
their academic and community 
involvement 

Cox maintains a 4.72 grade point 



average and is in the top 10 percent of her 
class participating in honors trigonometry 
and English. She is a cheerieader and 
member of the school's softball and field 
hockey teams. She was nominated to the 
National Honor Society as well. She also 
instructs gymnastics for pre-schoolers 
through 13-year-olds with the Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Department and 
umpires for the Little League Association. 

In college, she plans to study 
accounting and hopes to b(XX)me a certified 
public accountant (CPA). 

Cox was among more than 60 students 
from high schools through Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Ohio, Minnesota, 
Missouri, Pennsylvania, Texas and 
Washington who participated in the 
competition. Participation is limited to 
high school seniors who rank in the upper 
third of their high school class and have 
maintained a minimum of a 3.0 GPA. 

"The honors competition is our attempt 
to attract the most well-rounded high 
school students, who will be our students 
and campus leaders in a few years," 
explained Lori Hall, MacMurray assistant 
director of admissions. 

MacMurray college, is a private, four- 
year liberal arts college affiliated with the 
United Methodist Church. It is located 
approximately 30 miles west of 
Springfield, III and attracts students from 
more than 20 states. The college 
specializes in the teaching of education for 
the hearing impaired, nursing, pre-medical 
and prc-cngincering fields. 

This fall the college was listed by U.S. 
News and World Report as being among 
the top 140 national liberal arts colleges 
in the United States and was rated by 
Money magazine as one of the "best 
buys" in college education for 1992. 




Crystal Cox of Antioch pictured with MacMurray College Admissions Counselor 
David Fuller during a visit to the Jacksonville, III. school for honors scholarship 
competition. 



to cut around some of this 
and get something done." 

The Anita S. apartment 
complex is viewed with 
mixed emotions by police, 
neighbors and the residents 
themselves. Problems that 
have arrived in Antioch 
with the apartments and 
their residents are partially 



cated ordinances take a long blamed on too many people 
lime," he said. "We've got in a confined area. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

The following parcels of property, acquired through the 
Tax Sale Certificate Program, are being offered for sale 
by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of 
Lake, Tax Extension Department, Room 601, 18 N. 
County St., Waukegan, Illinois, 60085. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 days after the 
initial bid. After completion of the 30 day period, the 
County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject 
it if the amount is insufficient or if the sale would not be 
in the best interest of Lake County Taxpayers. 

Linda fanuzi Hess 
Lake Count) Clerk 

60002 

02-21-405-011 
02-21-213-021 
02-21-213-020 
02-21-204-007 
02-21-406-011 
02-21-406-010 
02-21-406-009 
02-21-406-008 
02-21-406-007 
02-21-406-006 
02-21-406-005 
01-35-105-002 
60002 
02-05-405-007 

0292B-362-AR 
FebnJary 14,1992 



UNINCORPORATED ANTIOCH 

22085 W. Calvin Drive 
22184 W. North Drive 
22206 W. North Drive 
40982 N. Ridge Circle 
22085 W. Sarana Drive 
22099 W. Sarana Drive 
22113 W. Sarana Drive 
22119W. Sarana Drive 
22129 W. Sarana Drive 
22135 W. Sarana Drive 
22147W. Sarana Drive 
26869 N. Stonegale Drive 
INCORPORATED ANTIOCH 
Zelinger Road ' 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
FILE NO: ZBA 92-1 ( 16-46-10) - 
DATE: Wednesday, March 4, 1992 
TIfwIE: 7:30 P.f^. 

PLACE: Board Room. Village Hall, 874 IVIain Street. 
Antioch, IL 60002. 

PETITIONER: Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems, Inc., 
840 East State Parkway, Schaumburg, IL 60173 

PETITIONER'S REQUEST: B-3 with B-3 Special Use 
and Variations in order to erect a 150-foot self-supported 
steel telecommunications tower and adjacent one-story 
12x28 foot unmanned equipment building on the 
property described below. 

PROPERTY IN QUESTION: Commonly known as 
Antioch Tire. Inc. Located at 22161 Route 173, Antioch, 
IL 60002. and legally described as follows: 

The West 300.0 feel of the East 997.3 feet of Lot 19 in 
School Tnjstees Subdivision of Section 16, Township 46 
North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, in 
Lake County. Illinois. 

PROPERTY OWNERS: John J. Lavelle and Anthony 
Lavelle, c/o Antioch Tire, Inc.. 22161 Route 173, Antioch. 
IL 60002. 

All persons desiring to appear and be heard thereon 
for or against said petition may appear at said Hearing 
and be heard. 

ANTIOCH ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Edward Koziorowski, Chairman 

0292B-370-AR 

February 14. 1992 



8 Lakeland Nowspap«rs 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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^iJ s.-L;?_r->-t-i«: 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



,-1■^;F>Lv■.,-^■..-..■.v,■->-|,..:», .^L. 



^c^^J^r:^-^■^i-u;'v^;^ 



111''-;''"''- ~ ' '•' 






Sherifrs Association plans to offer 121 scholarships 



Lake County Sheriff 
Clinton O. Grinnell an- 
nounced that the Illinois 
Sherifrs Association plans 
to award 121 scholarships 
of a maximum of $500 
each, for the academic year 
1992-93. The goal of the 
Association is to provide 
assistance to worthy Illinois 
students in furthering their 
education and training. 

The scholarships will be 
awarded to students pursu- 
ing courses of vocational 
training or attending 
institutions of higher learn- 
ing in Illinois. There is no 
restriction on applications 
by reason of race, creed, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
BID NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
TOWN OF LAKE VILLA 

Notice is hereby given 
tiiat sealed proposals will 
be received at the office 
of Ted Restarski, Town 
Clerk, at 37908 North 
Fairfield Road, Lake Villa. 
Illinois 60046 for ONE 
DISC STYLE BRUSH 
CHIPPER. Specifications 
are available at the office. 
Bid opening is to be at 
10:00 A.M. February 27, 
1992. Thursday at the 
Lake Villa Township 
Office. Furttier information 
regarding the letting may 
be obtained by contacting 
the Highway Commis- 
sioner at (708) 356-5831 . 
The township in accor- 
dance with the laws of the 
State of Illinois hereby 
notifies all bidders that it 
will affirmatively insure 
that the contract entered 
Into pursuant to this 
advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest 
responsible bidder without 
discrimination on the 
grounds of race, color, or 
national origin. 

By Order of 

James J. Semmerling 

Lake Villa Township 

Highway Commissioner 

Dated February 7, 1992 

0292B-363-GEN 

February 14. 1992 



color, age, sex, national 
origin or the course of study 
to .be pursued. The only 
limitations are that appli- 
cants be permanent residents 
of Illinois, the scholarships 
are to be utilized at institu- 
tions of learning within the 
state of Illinois and ihc stu- 
dents must plan to be en- 
rolled as full-time, under- 
graduate students. 

The Sheriffs scholarship 
program is funded through 
the various programs of the 
Illinois Sheriffs Associa- 
tion, including the Associ- 
ate Membership Program, 

Sheriff Grinnell advises 
all interested students to 



consult the administrator of information and applica- 

the school they are attend- tions. Applicants should 

ing now, or the Sheriffs submit their completed ap- 

office at (708)360-5830 for plication forms to the Lake 



County Sheriffs Depart- EL 60085 before the deadline 

ment Attention: Commu- of March 1. Award rc- 

niiy Services Division, 25 cipients will be announced 

S. Utica Street, Waukegan, by May 1. 



SWCD sets annual election meeting 



The annual meeting and 
election for the Lake 
County Soil and Water 
Conservation District 
(SWCD) will be held Feb. 
19 at the University of Illi- 
nois cooperative Extension 
Service Auditorium in 
Grayslake. Preceding the 
meeting will be a luncheon 
buffet beginning at noon. 

The election of officers 



will begin at 1 p.m., ac- 
cording to Doris Weidner, 
chairwoman of the district. 
Weidner indicates "the dis- 
trict was established by 
state law. The SWCD is a 
public body which addresses 
natural resource concerns 
throughout the county. The 
disuict does not have taxing 
power. Director respon- 
sibilities include program 



development, addressing 
land protection, erosion 
control, flood control, 
drainage and natural resource 
planning. Services and 
programs are voluntary and 
free unless mandated by 
law." 

The current board of di- 
rectors includes Weidner, 
Homer White, Walter Dal- 
itsch, Jr., Jerry Henningfeld 



and Ginny Nelson Wulf, 
The terms of Dalitsch, 
Weidner and White expire 

this year. The election will 
fill their positions for two- 
year terms. 

Those wishing to vote 
in the election need not at- 
tend the luncheon. For more 

information call the district 
ofTicc at (708)223-1056. 



A stay in the hospital 
can crush your nest egg! 

Call your Pekin Agent about 
a $1,000,000 Major Medical Policy 

Excellent coverage at reasonable rates. 



fi m WflY TO KEEP FIT EVERY SEfiSON 




MARTIN INSURANCE 
708-5864755 



Pekin Insurance is an A.M. BEST 
rated - A-^ (Superior) Company 







LUKE COONTY'S 

UiRQEST SELECTION OF 

FITNESS EQUIPMENT 

CALL US TODAV FOR A 
FITTER TOMORROW 



K 

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Sir 



FITNESS & CYCLING GEAR 
OF LAKE ZURICH 

808 S. RAND RD. 

LAKE ZURICH (Next to Wal-Mart) 

708-438-1808 



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T^rTTTsrrr; 



a^^^^s^^^^^T^. 



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etiouB^ 
991'TaxRefun 

I As Little 
tolTDay 



— f 



How low do CD rates have to 
fall before you'll look at. . . 

SMART 

Alternatives. 






w 



tsa^ 




For more information, call: 

Suburban National Bank 
of Lake County 

1 175 Corporate Woods Parkway 

Vernon Hills 

708-913-0900 




If you aren't satisfied with current CD renewal rates, consider 
these higher-yielding investment from A.G. Edwards: 

Currenl CD Rales 4% 

US Governmenl Guaranteed Bonds 71/2% 

'Federally Tax Free Municipal Bonds 6 1/2% 

Call A.G. Edwards today and ask about smart alternatives. 



- Equals 
9<yofroma 

taKable 
Investment* 



Bonds tubfct to price dtangeand avalablify. Yields andmaiiel vsluti miy IhctMle it tfia bctiii 119 sold prior lo matuiity. tAjriapd bands maybe 

suited to itile and local tuai and tie a/temaiiVa mi/vmun fai, Co<nr,menlguafantee applies to tmely fayment ol pfindpal anrfinlsfss*. 

•hlhe3}%laxbiackel 

CDs aia hderaiyimutd ond many diHet torn alternative) iscussadin terns ol sahly. return olpiirKpal, lax consequences, hngij olin\festner\l and 

investor suitabiity. 

AXlEdwards 



CAJH/TRnon 



Member, FDIC 



CALL TODAY 

AL RODRIGUEZ 

312-648-5314 



222 Riverside Plaza 

Chicago, IL 60606-5901 

312-648-5314 



PLEASE CLIP AND RETURN FOR MORE INFORMATION 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



CITY & STATE. 



PHONE 

Memb«f SIPC 



1991 AG. Edwards 4 Sons, Inc. 



.,J,«1.SV. 



Friday. February 14, 1992 



Lakotand Nowspapors 9 



sett;" 



,V»«SftH.*2tVS-^P, 



LaReland's EDITORIAL 



Lawyers dodge label 



Next month many of us will go to the 
polls to nominate the people to serve in 
public office the next two or four years. 

Almost 30 of those jobs are here in 
Lake County. Candidates are on the 
ballot for jobs ranging from coroner to the 
County Board. 

Another nine offices are jobs in 
Springfield as state senator or 
representative. 

Some of those asking for our vote 
have served us well for eight, 10 or 12 
years. Like William "Bill" Peterson 
running for state senate in the new 26th 
DisL, David Barkhauscn for senate in the 
30lh Dist., state representatives Adeline 
Geo-Karis in in the 31st Dist. and Robert 
Churchill in the 62nd Dist. 

With the exception of Peterson and 
Barkhauscn, the nine Legislative posts arc 
contested. 

Between now and March 17 voters will 
be asked to decipher the rhetoric and 
entrust their confidence to the best man or 
woman for Ihc job. 

Some are highly qualified candidates 
who deserve to be elected or re-elcctcd. 

But there's something different about 
the candidates this year. They want to be 
one of us. Whether appealing to white 
collar or blue collar voters, they want to 
be one of them. 

The least-promoted label is that of 



attorney or lawyer. Geo-Karis doesn't use 
iU Neither docs Barkhauscn. Churchill 
quietly mentions it if asked. 

Two other lawyer/attorney candidates 
on the ballot are trying to promote an 
altogether different image. 

Al Salvi running for state 
representative in the 52nd Dist. is a trial 
lawyer. But his literature calls him a 
small businessman. He runs a one-man 
law firm in Waukcgan. 

Paul Chervin, who heads a major law 
firm in Waukcgan, is running against 
Geo-Karis for the state senate. He sees 
himself a "ciUzen-Iegislalor.'' 

Does this suggest something? 

Are there already too many lawyers in 
Springfield making more laws to enforce 
tliose already on the books? An estimated 
20 to 25 percent of the General Assembly 
has a legal background. Lawyers are the 
predominant occupation of legislators. 

Do we need more? 

Voters will have to decide that. 

Personally, we think Illinois needs 
more office holders like small insurance 
businessman Ralph Swank (running for 
stale representative in the 61st DisL) and 
former Buffalo Grove Mayor Vcrna 
Clayton (running for state representative 
in the new 51st Dist.). 

They are close to the people they seek 
to represent. 



Letters to the Editor 



Rude Stevenson fans 

Editor 

We attended a basketball game featuring 
two great teams, Warren Township and 
Stevenson High, a competition to decide 
No. 1 in the North Suburban Conference. 
Warren players played hard as did 
Stevenson. We on the Warren side 
became very upset due to the behavior of 
Stevenson to the Warren players and 
Wanen cheericadCTS. 

We knew the Stevenson crowd was 
going to be rude from the very start. 
Singing the National Anthem was a 
young fellow with a beautiful voice. 
Stevenson began cheering and literally 
drowned him out. There was a complete 
lack of re5pccl(SLevenson) for the singer. 
Wancn cheerleaders were drowned out by 
Stevenson cheerieaders. 

Stevenson's star player, Chris Coleman, 
was on the bench with a hand injuiy. Not 
once did we hear negative, hurtful remarks 
about Coleman. Stevenson fans were rude 
to our players with remarks like "Kill the 
big guy; mess up his knee. Knock him 
on his screwed up knee." They were 
referring to a Warren player who had knee 
surgeiy. 

Stevenson wUi visit Warren in February. 
I'm not the only one who will remember 
their behavior. They will be our guests 
and we will treat them as guests. I only 
hope they remember to bring their 
manners. 

M.R. Piffle 
Gumee 

Endorsement confession 

Editon 

One of Al Salvi's three opponents 
from Barrington tried, unsuccessfully, to 
undo Grant Township's unanimous en- 
dorsement of Al Salvi. The basis? Al 
Salvi's opponent learned that his wife cir- 
culated the petition of a non-endorsed can- 
didate in the Porter/Sullivan race. 

The Lake County Republican endorsed 
candidate for state representative for tlie 
52nd District is Al Salvi. 

If it's so bad to circulate a petition for 
a non-endorsed candidate, then why arc Al 
Salvi's Barrington opponents running 
against the endorsed candidate Al Salvi? 

Charlene Beyer 

Round Lake Park 

• 

Residence established 

Editor 

I read your "Viewpoint" article about 
Loren Janusz in (he Jan. 24, 1992 issue of 



Libcrtyville News. The only point I 
would like \o make is that Mr. Janusz 
does not live in Meitawa. He has been 
quoted twice with a Mettawa address, once 
in your paper and again in the Waukcgan 
News-Sun. In fact, Mr. Janusz resides in 
unincorporated Lake County. 

Raymond C. Hirlh 
Trustee, Village of Mcuawa 

Township skullduggery 

Editon 

I was interested to read that the Avon 
Twp. Board, after taking office in 1989, 
gave newly-elected township clerk a raise 
in pay and justified it by saying she would 
be a full-time employee and given addi- 
tional duties as office manager. 

Now, I read the clerk has gone to work 
for the Round Lake Heights police de- 
partment as records clerk in 1991, a job 
whose hours were 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. I called the township office to ask 
what time their offices were open, and 
they told me from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday! 

How can an elected official be given a 
raise after they lake office under the excuse 
they are given additional full-time duties 
(requiring full-time work), and then with 
the approval of the township board, take 
another job during the exact hours of 
business? 

It's no wonder people loose faith in our 
elected officials with this type of skull- 
duggery. 

Dave Thomas 
Grayslake, 

Questionable legend 

Editon 

It's interesting to note that Davida 
Terry's choice for a fund-raiser personality 
to help us to hearken back to the days 
(Continued on next page) 



Letters Invited 

Letters to the editor are vi^clcomc. 
They should be on topics of gener- 
al interest, approximately 250 
words or less. All letters must be 
signed, and contain home address 
and telephone number. The editor 
reserve's the right to condense all 
letters. 



Viewpoint 



Republicans 
baring their 
knuckles 

by BILL SCHROEDER 

Liberals and Democrats are going to cry 
dirty pool, but Republicans are 
developing a subtle 1992 campaign theme 
that puts the patriotism of opponents on 
the luie. 

And, interestingly, the strategy seems to 
stretch from our town to the White 
House. 

Making a Lincoln Day appearance in the 
county, Gov, Jim Edgar took Democrats 
to task for "trying to undermine the 
system." Edgar, of course, is implying 
that Republicans understand "the system" 
and are ready, willing and able to do 
what's best here, in Springfield and in 
Washington. 

Relaxed, confident and speaking in 
modulated tones as opposed to his 
secretary of state's choir boy voice, the 
Guv got in some excellent political shots 
in a self-effacing manner, preferring to 
talk about local candidates and Rich 
Williamson. GOP aspirant for U.S.; 
senator, rather than himself. 

Edgar's style played right into the theme 
of electing candidates to public office who 
will fight unbridled spending, higher 
taxes and [Htmiote individual freedom. To 
hear Edgar talk, the bailie for freedom 
begins in the village hall and the 
courthouse and extends to Capitol Hill. 
The governor pointedly sketched the 
incongruity of the quest for freedom in 
former Soviet Russian while Democrats 
in Washington and Springfield are racing 
down the path of socialism. 

Shades of Willie Horton! Sounds like 
the GOP is preparing for bare knuckle 
fighting this year. 

••••••• 

GOOD LISTENERS— Count 
Congressman Phil Crane as a prominent 
U.S. official not engaging in Japan 
bashing. Crane, in fact, is willing to 
give the Japanese due credit for being 
good listeners. 

"Their taxation system which 
emphasizes saving and investment is 
right out of the University of Chicago 
School of Economics." observes Crane, 
who points out that the Japanese are 
doing exactly "what we told them to do" 
after Worid War U when they were 
rebuilding their war-torn economy and a 
nation in shambles. 

With no little amusement. Crane related 
a trip to Japan 10 years ago where • 
American business leaders and politicians 
were bug-eyed over irmovative Japanese 
automotive manufacturing techniques, 
particularly in the area of robotics. 

Japanese car makers expressed 
wonderment. Crane recalled, when they 
learned that U.S. car makers weren't 
. icmploying robots in the early 1980's 
"because we learned all about them from 
you." Another example of good 
listening. 

Conversation with Crane was 
disquieting to the extent that Mexico now 
is making tremendous economic strides 
employing methods and policies learned 
in American universities. Another Japan 
right on our sodthem border? 

Smart folks, those Japanese and 
Mexicans. They listen and leam from our 
professors, but pay no attention to our 
politicians. 

••••••• 

DOUBLE OUCH— State Sen. Jack 
Schaffer, running for a Congressional scat 
in northern Illinois, concedes that facing a 
primary battle in unfamiliar territory is a 
j lot tougher than running for reelection in 
Wauconda, Crystal Lake fx Fox Lake. 




"I found that out when Iowa television 
iniervicwed me on my first stop." 

Speaking of the primary, Schaffer 
exclaimed, "I'd rather slide down a razor." 
The talented McHenry County 
Republican relishes the thought of 
tackling a liberal Democrat in November, 
but he admits he's working hard to defeat 
a primary foe. Schaffer's foe is an 
auorney. This is one election where 
members of the bar are encountering voter 
hostility. "I don't mind that at all." 
Schaffer admits with a grin. - 

••••••• 

RARE TYPE— School boards might 
(^)erale differently if there were more 
people like Bud Jasmer, who attends 
meetings and takes notes. The retired Ft 
Sheridan maintenance supervisor 
monitors the workings of the Antioch 
High School board closely. When Jasmer 
has questions, he speaks ouL After 
spending more than 30 years in Civil 
Service, Jasmer has some interesting 
insights into how government works. 

One thing that bothers the mild- 
maimered retiree is that elected officials 
lend to label anyone who asks a question 
as an opponent or a trouble maker. "I'm 
not against education. I just want to be 
informed," Jasmer explains as he gathers 
information about enrollments and tax 
rales for the district expcricncuig growth 
problems. Jasmer feels AHS has some 
dcfmiie needs, but the requirements might 
not be embodied in a $32 million new 
school plan shot down by voters last fall. 



Where to Write 
Representatives 

U.S. Senators 

Paul Simon (D) 
Alan J. Dixon (D) 
Senate Office Building 

Washington, D.C. 20510 
U.S. Representatives 
Philip Crane (R) 
House Office Building 

Washington, D.C. 20515 
John Porter (R) 
1026 Longworth Building 

Washington, D.C. 20515 
Illinois Governor 
Gov. James Edgar (R) 
207 State House 

Springfield, HI. 62706 
Senators- 30th District 
David N. Barkhausen (R) 
273 l\Aai:ket Square 

Lake Forest, IL 60045 
31st District 

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis (R) 
P.O. Box 33 

Zion, ill. 60099 
32nd District 
Jack Schaffer (R) 
56 N. Wiliiams-St. 

Crystal Lake. Hi 60014 ' 
Representatlves-59th District 
Virginia Fiester Frederick (R) 
222 E. Wisconsin Ave. 

Lake Forest, III. 60045 
61st District 
John S. Matiievich (D) 
3045 21st PL 

North Chicago, III. 60064 
62nd District 
Robert Churchill (R) 
976 Hillside - 

Antioch. III. 60002 
63rd District 
DickKlemm(R) 
3 W. Crystal Lake Ave. 

Crystal Lake.llL 60014 
60th District 
William E. Peterson (R) 
23450 N. hAain St. 

Prairie View, IL 60C69 



10 lakoland N«wspap«rs 



Friday, Fobruary 14. 1992 



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Lakeland's OPINION 



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CHURCHILL'S NEMISIS 

State Rep. Robert Churchill isn't 
getting a fiee ride back to the 62nd Dist. 
seat he has had in Springfleld for 10 
years. 

Early on it looked like he might go 
without spending a dime for re-election. 
He had no opposition. 

That was before Jim Mitchell 
moved to Lindenhurst The two-time 
{^pointed County Board member from 
Dccrfield was a last-minute filer for 
Churchill's job. He's also running for the 
County Board in the 3rd DisL where there 
are several candidates beginning with in- 
cumbent Suzl Schmidt of Lake 
Villa. 

Who's this Mitchell's guy? He's never 
won a major election. 

As for Churchill, his campaign went 
from spending nothing to one costing 
$25,000. 

Some of that money was used to file a 
challenge to Mitchell's petitions. Almost 
100 signatures were thrown out. The 
signers weren't registered. It didn't work. 
Mitchell can still play spoiler. 

"This proves Churchill is beatable," 
Mitchell said philosophically. 

GOP HEART THROB 

Winner of this year's prestigious 
Heartbeat award of the Grant Twp. 
Republican Club is one of their own. 
Donna Mae Litwiler. 

She follows such recipients as Coroner 
Barbara Richardson, the late Sheriff 
Mickey Babcox, U.S. Dist Atty. 
Fred Foreman (while Lake County 
state's attorney) and a host of others. 

A committeeman for 20 years, Donna 
is township GOP chairman. A fixture in 
the Seoetaiy of State's office, her vanity 
license plate is "The Lip." She's a per- 
sonal friend of Gov. Jim Edgar, former 
secretary of stale. 

The award is for service to the Repub- 
lican party. 

BIG BUCK CAMPAIGNS 

This year's first and, probably, only 
$100 per person fund reiser was last Fri- 
day at the posh Midlane Country Club in 
Waukegan. 

It was for LibertyviUe Twp. Supv. 
Ralph Swank Jr., who is running for 
state rep in the new 61st Dist Some 250 
people showed iq). 

What's he doing with the war chest? 
Matching challenger Andrea Moore 
mailing for mailing. Somebody must 
have coordinated their first two to ^rive 
almost simultaneously. 

Also helping the U.S. Postal Service 
become more proStable are two candidates 
in the new 52nd Dist — Al Salvi and 
Nancy Masterson. They have had four. 
More are on the way. At $10,000 per 



Letters 



792 



(ContiDoed ft'om preceding page) 

when "life was simpler and you couldn't 
tell a dirty joke on the radio" is the same 
radio legend Dick Biondi who, if memory 
serves, was thrown out of Chicago for 

doing just that 

Dave Skofstad 
Antioch 

Too much giveaway 

Editor 

Public officials and employees paid by 
taxpayers for villages, townships, coun- 
ties, states and the army of federal repre- 
sentatives and employees across this 
country are milking the taxpayers of mil- 
lions and billions of dollars for every paid 
holiday and paid sick leave. 

It cost the taxpayers just on the federal 
level alone $291,240,000 for one legal 
holiday, now don't forget all the other 
government agencies who are also getting 
paid. (I say) the party is over, let's go 
back to the beginning, when you work 
you get paid. 

Friday, Fobruarv 14, 1992 



crack, printing and postage, voters are 
getting an expensive diet of politics. 

CRANE TAKES HEAT 

Congress Phil Crane of the new 8th 
Dist wasn't too worried about the spring 
primary as of last week. He put up a cou- 
ple of billboards calling himself the 
"Taxpayer's best fnend," sent out a 
newsletter and dubious survey at taxpayer 
expense. 

Then, he went to Mexico for a 
weekend junket Admittedly, it was on 
business. Something about a government 
trade mission and jobs. It was a two-days 
in Mexico City where the temperature is 
90-degrees plus. 

Sure is nice work if you can get it 

Oh yes. remember opponent Gary 
Skoien's challenge to Crane's residency. 
Is is McHenry (a coach house above a 
garage) Mt IVospect (the home of an 
aide) of Arlington, Va. (where he has a 
real home)? The state Elections Board 
threw it out 

"This was another of Skoien's non-is- 
sue, ginmiicks and cheap shots designed 
to get publicity." said Crane aide Kin 
Johnson. 

Unlike the 10th Dist where pro-choice 
incumbent Congressman John Porter is 
facing right-to-lifer Kathleen Sulli- 
van, that issue hasn't come up in the 8th 
Dist For those who want to know, Crane 
is pco-life, Skoien pro-choice. 

GREAT HUNTER 

Grant Twp. Highway Comm. Jack 
Kiesgen is a good hunter. Years ago, on 
a downstate goose hunting trip, he 
brought back back a girl named Char- 
lotte. She became his wife and a County 
Board member in Dist 4. 

Last year, Charlotte, who has a county- 
western voice like Patsy Kline, ran off 
with another singer, Ron Fayton. They 
are supposedly living and singing in an 
area around Hoopsloa 

That gave Jack time to go hunting 
again. This time for quail. Seen with him 
asof late is a trophy named Kim. She's a 
knock out Jack looks great himself. 
Looks like he's found the fountain of 
youth. 

LIKE FATHER, LIKE... 

Congressman Phil Crane's (R- 
Mount Prospect) Idds aren't exactly a chip 
off the old block. 

Three of them appeared on the "Studs" 
TV show earlier this month. This is 
where unknown men and women are 
paired, go on dates and return to tell about 
it 

Of the congressman's seven daughters, 
three were on the racy Fox network show; 
Susaimah, 27; Rachel, 25; and Canie, 18. 



Most Americans work until they reach 
the age of 62 years old (early retirement) 
and a lot of them work until the age of 65 
years old before retiring to collect Social 
Security. In government, however, you 
can retire with 20 to 30 years of service 
and become eligible for full pay pension. 
These early birds then go back out into 
the work force, work until they're 62 and 
now they're eligible for another pension. 
Most people call them double dippers. 
(Why not make it starting in January 
1993, that taxpayers' paid pensions cannot 
be received until you reach the govern- 
ment specified retirement age of 62 or 65 
years under the Social Security Act, and 
get back all the giveaway paid holidays). 

Taxpayers, we can save the country 
from financial disaster. Writer your Con- 
gressman, State Representative and the 
President of the United States. Let's get it 
on the ballot in the November general 
election. 

Jack Cervac 
LibertyviUe 



Comments they made about two men 
included* 

"He's got a butt like a Twinkle. Just 
bursting with cream." 

"Even our sweat couldn't put out the 
fire we started in his bedroom.** 

"'Chir bodies went together like jelly in 
a doughnut" 

"I painted his flesh with the gloss from 
my lips." 

Ciane didn't see the show. 

COATTAIL WAR 

Lots of red Al Salvi (state rep. 
candidate in the 52nd Dist) and Howard 
Bieze (County Board hopeful in Dist 5) 
were posted ade-by side the first wedcend 
of signmania. 

"Are you riding Bieze's coattails or is 
he riding yours?" I asked Salvi. 

"Neither," he said- "It was just an 
overly ambitious sign ctcw," he said of 
the signmakers led by Gumee Atty. Peter 
Karlovics. 

"I heard about it" Salvi said of the 
Grant Twp. crowd backing Fox Lake 
druggist Ed Fojtik. "I told them to go 
ahead and do the same." 

FRANK'S BIG PARTY 

Recorder of Deeds Frank Nostra will 
have his very first fund raiser. After 53 
years in public office, he decided it was 
about time. 

People have been asking him to hold 
one ever since his 50-year testimonial 
three years ago. Second, he needs the 
money. "Mailings and campaigning costs 
so much more these days," said the 
recorder of 32 years. 

The party will be Thursday. Feb. 20 at 
the Country Squire restaurant Grayslake, 
from 5 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 each. 
This is a must-show event for candidates. 



OVERHEARD/SEEN 

LAKE VILLA— County Board 
member Suzi Schmidt was called to 
California over the weekend when her fa- 
ther suffered an aneurysm and stroke. He 
died Feb. 10. The absence cost her a radio 
Interview, a candidate forum and, possi- 
bly, an appearance at her own fiirid raiser 
on Saturday at the Brae Loch Country 
Club in Grayslake. 4444 LIBER- 
TYVfLLE — J xk. Martin says his peti- 
tions for precinct committee didn't have 
any ringers. "My son, Gregory, who owns 
a condo in Fox Lake, did not sign," he 
said. "Neither did my other two sons be- 
cause they are away at school. A Joe 
Martin, no relation, did sign." Only 10 
signatures were needed. Martin got 12, 
just in case. ###^ BEACH PARK— 
Eleanor Rostron, who is running 




I by JOE 
SOULAK 



SPEAKING 



against Robert Neal for the County 
Board in Dist 2, has a grass-roots cam- 
paign. It is post cards, signs and a lot of 
knocking on doors. "I can't outspend Neal. 
And I certainly can't out talk him because 
that is what he does best So I'm doing 
what I know best Going to the people." 
##ii« LIRERTVVLLF^ Stotinnnrv 

of former township Supv. P.T. "Mike" 
Graham has always feabired a pastoral 
scene and Will Rogers words: "We ain't 
making no more land." Appropriate for 
Mr. Open Space. As for Mrs. Open 
Space, that title might go to Carol 
Calabresa, Graham's one-time County 
Board counteip^t Her stationary features 
a tree-covered country lane and the words: 
Protecting today's envuormient for to- 
morrow's needs." iitt#li AN- 
'nOICH— T udv Martini candidate for 
the County Board in Dist 1, isn't shy. 
Tm the youngest and prettiest of all the 
candidates," said the 39-year old real estate 
agent Her task: unseat incumbent Jim 
Fields. He's the County Board fixture 
famous for the line: "I can't do anything 
about it" 

COMING EVENTS 

###tf Friday. Feb. 14— Valen- 
tine's Day reception for state Sen. Adeline 
Geo-Karis (R-Zion), Country Squire, 
Grayslake, 5 to 8 p.m. For $25 tickets 
call (708) 872-5661. #tf ## Friday. 
Feb. 14 — Fund raiser for Dist 3 
Cbunty Board candidate Barbara 
OilscWager at Lake Villa VFW, Grand 
Ave., 7:30 pjn. to 12:30 a.m.. For $10 
Uckets call Bill Bums at (708) 356-1076. 
#### Satiirdfly. Feh. IS— Fund 
raiser for Cbunty Board incumbents Suzi 
Schmidt of Lake Villa and Larry Lcafblad 
of Highland Lake at Brae Loch Country 
Club, Grayslake, 8 p.m. to midnight For 
$15 tickets or $25 per couple, call 
Schmidt at (708) 355-3173. ##i# 



(Editor's note: Jack Cervac is 
the Democratic candidate for 
County Board Dist. 13 in the 
March 17 primary). 

Distrust of bigness 

Editor 

Our founding fathers harbored an 
ingrained distrust of large government 
Now their fears have been realized. Our 
daily lives are regulated to the point of 
oppression and our economy is grievously 
afflicted largely due to increased taxation 
and the inept and prolonged tinkering with 
the economy. 

Our economy is in shambles, there is a 
huge trade imbalance, many financial 
institutions on the brink of bankruptcy, 
an education system slipping rapidly 
behind the rest of the worid, and a healdi 
care system bogged down in pq)er work 
and outrageous costs. 

Where are we looking for solutions and 
where are we seeking relief? Many are 
imploring our Legislature and political 



leadership for answers. This doesn't make 
sense. Thomas Jefferson stated in his 
inaugural address in 1801: 

"A wise and frugal government which 
shall restrain men from injuring one 
another, shall leave them free to regulate 
their own pursuits of industry and 
improvement and shall not take from the 
mouth of labor the bread it has earned. 
This is the sum of good government** 

Let's begin now to readopt that 
philosophy and make those words the 
foundation for the reforms that must 
appear if we hope to rescue this nation 
fhHn its decline. 

Brad Muse 

McHenry 

(Editor's note: Brad Muse is a 
member of United Taxpayers of 
Illinois and a candidate for a 
Republican nomination for 
County Board Dist. 5 
representative.) 



Lakeland Newspapers 11 



Mi^ilMmSCJUNT^iiNBii 





by JOSEPH SOULAK 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Gov. James Edgar was the big draw for 
the 400 Republican faithful attending this 
year's 44ih annual Lincoln Day dinner in 
Grant Twp. 

He became another in a scries of Re- 
publican governors who have addressed 
this audience over the years. Edgar is no 
stranger to this occasion or its sponsors. 
After being elected secretary of state in 
1981 this Lincoln Day dinner was one of 
his first speeches. 

Over the yeai^ Edgar made additional 
appearances in Lake County and Fox 
IJake. The most intensive led to his 1980 
election as governor. 

Helping in the 1980 and 1990 races 
was his county campaign coordinator, 
EJonna Mae LitwUer of Long Lake. She is 
cumendy the senior citizen coordinator for 
the secretary of stale's office, which Edgar 
fcHmerly headed. 

Litwilcr recalled at the Feb. 8 Lincoln 
Day dinner that Edgar was so impressed 
by her tenacity, vocal ability and willing- 
ness to get things done he paid for her 
personalized license plate, "The Lip." 

"Donna Mae and Grant Twp. have 




Grant heartthrob 

Winner of this year's Heartbeat award of 
the Grant Twp. Republican Club is 
Donna Mae Litwiler, at podium. — Photo 
by Ray Plum 



ies GOP 



been good to Edgar," the speaker said. 

As Edgar was impressed, so was this 
year's Republican club commitlee to pick 
the recipient of the 1992 Heartbeat award. 
The hands-down winner was Litwilcr. She 
follovvs such other distinguished recipients 
as U.S. Ally. General Fred Foreman, 
Coroner Barbara Richardson and the late 
sheriff, Robert "Mickey" Babcox. The 
award is for outstanding, continued service 
to the Republican party. Litwiler, who 
was also honored at Uie dinner for her 20 
years as a Republican precinct commit- 
teeman, is currently serving as township 
party chairman. 

Edgar recalled his 1981 appearance at 
this events saying an aide questioned his 
attending a township function. "You've 
got to understand this function is bigger 
than a township," he answered. "It's big- 
ger than some counties." This year's was. 

A sell-out crowd of 400 attended. They 
ranged from committeemen and their 
wives to Congressman Philip Crane (R- 
Mount Prospect), Foreman, Richardson 
Sheriff Clinton Grinnell and dozens of 
candidates for the March primary. For 
them it was a "must show" event 

Edgar lauded those candidates, a hand- 
ful of them for scats in the nine House 
and Senate seats to be filled from Lake 
County this year. New arc one in the 
Senate and two in the House. 

The gov^n(»r said new candidates bring 
new "faces" to the party. When he first 
ran for a local office in 1974, Edgar said 
his supporters were young, idealistic and 
determined. "I lost that election. But many 
of those supporters are still there. Today 
they are the established." 

Thanks to Republican redistricting, 
Edgar said he hopes to have a Republican 
majority in both branches after the 
November elections. "I need this to ad- 
vance my programs," the governor said. 

Just as he needs help in November, so 
docs President George Bush, the governor 
said. With that he introduced Rich 
Williamson, candidate for the U.S. Senate 
in the fall election. 





Edgar is chairman of Bush's Illinois 
campaign. He noted Illinois is one of 
thrce pivotal states in the election. 

Edgar admitted the national economy 
is "sluggish" and Bush has a battle on his 
hands. "Two weeks ago the president out- 
lined his economic program and gave 
Congress 60 days to act," the governor 
said in turning his attention to Washing- 
ton. "If Congress is concerned about jobs 
and the economy, it will move. If not, the 
Democrats will have to take the blame." 

Despite the Republican president hav- 
ing a Democratic Congress, Edgar said 
positive things can be accomplished. He 
cited his own experience with a partisan 
Democratic Assembly led by powerful 
Mike Madigan. "We closed a $350 mil- 
lion gap last July and came back together 
last month to tighten our belt even more," 
he said of two legislative fights that ended 
in compromises to maintain the fiscal 
healdi of Illinois. 



"I stood firm. I said no. We can't spend 
money we don't have." 

"Today the governor and legislature arc 
closer than all my 25 years in Spring- 
field," he said of political roots going 
back to his days as a state representative. 

"But I could do much more if I had a 
Republican House and Senate," the 
governor said. "You would see a much 
better state . We will shed the excesses of 
the '80s and face the reality of the '90s." 

In closing, he intoned everyone at the 
prime rib dinner to work for the party in 
November, vote and "help build a better 
Illinois." 

He was given a standing ovation by 
the 400.^ 

But the man the occasion honored was 
never mentioned. There was a portrait of 
Abraham Lincoln on the podium where 
the governor spoke. Other than that, the 
I6th president was the forgotten man with 
his birthday four days away. 



■'-■\ 
i 




Lincoln Day dinner guests 

Of the record 400 persons attending this year's Lincoln Day dinner in Fox Lake, 
many were politicians. They were there because of guest speaker Jim Edgar, 
second from left, and to be seen as well as to see. Other politicos at the gath- 
ering included, from left, Sheriff Clinton Grinnell; Lake County GOP party 
chairman and state Rep. Robert Churchill (R-Lake Villa), third from left; and A! 
Jourdan of Crystal Lake, chairman of the Illinois Republican party. — Photo by 
Ray Plum 



Salvi, Mitchell, Grever still in race 



by DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Absentee voting in Lake County has 
been delayed until Monday due to pedtion 
challenges against one county board 
candidate and office seekers in four 
congressional districts. 

Linda Hess, Lake County Clerk, said, 
"We were unable to get the ballots printed 
because we do not have all the candidates' 
names because there have been objections 
filed to some petitions and the hearings 
have not been brought to a conclusion.** 
Consequently, though a Supreme Court 
order called for the ballots by Feb. 11. the 
vodng tickets will not be available until 
Feb. 17. 



In die 62nd congressional district, U.S. 
Rep. Robert Churchill has protested 
signatures on opponent James Mitchell's 
petition. U.S. Rep. Philip Crane's 
application for re-election in the new 8th 
congressional district has also been 
challenged, 

Barrington-based attorney Thomas 
Malik, who is opposing Al Salvi in the 
52nd disUict race for state representative, 
also is hoping to eliminate his 
compcdtion with a petition challenge. In 
the 26th district state senate race, Lori 
Peterson of Long Grove has objected to 
Steven Lasko's petidon. 

District 19 County Board candidates 
Robert Grever and Bruce Hansen, both of 



Lake Zurich, are also at odds. Though die 
Lake County Electoral Board mondis ago 
ruled to keep Grever on the ballot, Hansen 
appealed. Lake County Circuit Court 
Judge Stephen E. Walter Tuesday upheld 
die electoral board's decision. 

The Lake County Electoral Board 
Monday dismissed the complaint against 
Salvi when Malik failed to appear and 
make his case against his opponent's 
petition. 

The board deliberated for seven hours 
spread over two days before voting 
unanimously to retain Mitchell on die 
ballot. Hess said Churchill, counseled by 
attorney Bernard Wysocki, could invalidate 
only 76 of 401 signatures from Mitchell's 



petition, 25 short of putting his 
challenger out of die race. 

The county electoral board handles 
objections in legisladvc and congressional 
districts only when die districts lie wholly 
widiin Uic county. "This is die first time 
in nine years diat we have heard any state 
rep cases. There have been objecdons in 
the past but they have been in districts 
diat also lie in anodier county," Hess said. 

The State Board of Elccdons plans to 
majt Friday when it is expected to decide 
the challenges to Crane and Lasko's 
pedtions. 

"As soon as the ballots are printed we 
will be sending them out," Hess said. 





Riverwoods in country club case 



by DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Lake County Circuit Court Judge 
Stephen Walter said the Lake County 
Forest Preserve District has no obligadon 
to acquire Thorngale County Club, 
disappoindng Riverwoods trustees. 

In a suit filed last year, Riverwoods 
claimed die district prior to last spring's 
elecUon of a new board entered into a 
contract with die village to purchase the 
private golf course. As part of the 
contract, die district agreed to condemn die 
property in return for the village's 
contribuUon of $5 million toward die cost 
of acquisition. Riverwoods residents 
approved die move by referendum. 

The Forest Preserve Board agreed die 
former board, led by C. Richard Anderson, 
did audiorize the contract; however, a 
mondi later on Jan. IS die new board 
rescinded the action. Riverwoods 



challenged the move but Waller upheld die 
action Feb. 4. In reaching his decision, 
Walter rejected several arguments posed by 
Riverwoods, including its claim that the 
Forest Preserve acted in bad faith by 
refusing to honor the contract. 

"The previous board left us with an 
open-ended, muld-million dollar offer to 
acquire a private country club," said 
disUict President Andrea Moore. 

"When die new board took office, we 
immediately recognized diat we could not 
acquire Thomgate Country Club widiout 
sacrificing many other more appropriate 
acquisitions. We knew that our taxpayers- 
simply would not support die idea of 
spending $25- to- $30 million to buy a 
country club. I am relieved diat Judge 
Walter has sustained die current board's 
decision to abandon diis totally unrealisdc 
project," she said. 

The move to have the property at 



Arrowwood Trail and Riverwoods Road 
condemned comes from a desire by 
Riverwoods to block development of die 
country club by Lexington Homes, Inc. 
according to elected officials. The 
company has sought rczoning and 
anncxaUon into Riverwoods but about 
two months ago began pursuing rezoning 
with county. 

David Lcibson, director of marketing for 
Lexington Homes, Inc., said he did not 
know if die company planned to drop 
annexation efforts with Riverwoods. 
"We're anxious to get this property zoned 
and developed and will pursue all 
reasonable avenues," he said. 

Soured by Walter's decision, 
Riverwoods Trustee Paul Newall said, "I 
don't think Mrs. Moore has ever met a 
developer she didn't like. It is a condnuing 
shame in Lake County diat they (the 
Forest Preserve Board) talk out of one side 



of their moudi about open space, but they 
slap people in soudicm Lake County in 
die face by tearing up an agreement diat 
they had widi us. 

"It would appear as far as die County 
Board is concerned diat all south Lake 
County is good for is supplying taxes for 
them to spend elsewhere as they see fit" 

Riverwoods trustees intend to discuss 
die action and plan dicir next move Feb. 
18. Newall said he would support an 
appeal of Walter's decision. Board 
President Chuck Smith concurs. "We 
would like to acquire Thomgate by any 
legal means possible," he said. 

"That property is zoned for recreaUon 
and agriculture," Smidi said. "It lacks any 
infrastructure improvements. It has neidier 
sewer not water." 

Lexington Homes, Inc. has proposed 
building sewers to service the 
development 



12 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Sweetheart Feb. 1 4, 1 5 or 1 6 

.IttcUidcs: Dinner for 2 
(Plus Tax) atBelden Fmnilj/ Restauraut 



RESERVATIONS 
REQUIRED 



Choose from many month watering entrees 

including steaks & fresh seafood^ deluxe hotel 

accomodations at the 

Jiampton Inn including a bol 

of champagne in your room 

& continental breakfast 
at the hotel in the morning. 



iitle^ 




■i' ri""""^"^ 



^ 



^^elden::" 

FAMILY i^ 
RESTAURANT 



(Jfamptm 



662-2929 Grand Ave. & Dilley's Rd., Gumee 662- 1 1 00 




•Complcle inventory of rare 
coins, stamps & supplies 
• Estate jewelry bought or sold 



Jewelry • Coins • Stamps 



/^5^' 




For Your Valentine 

Complete line of quality jewelry 
14 K chains & bracelets 



708-587-5334 

27 North Rt. 12 

Fox Lake 



We Buy, Sellj Trade 

Instant cash paid. Now buying 
jewelry, coins, stamps, gold, 
silver, platinum & diamonds. 



MF 10-5:30; SaUCV3:M 
APPRAISALS {In our how-? or yourhojse) 



FREE VERBAL APPRAISALS ON ALL COINS. STAMPS & JEWELRY 




Treat Your 
Valentine 
Friday, 
AND TDRF\sat. 

INCLUDES: 
•8 oz. New York Strip Steak 
^ .4 oz. Cold Water Lobster 

PI •Complimenlary Glass of Champagne Or Wine 
Ijd -Soup ♦Salad Bar 'Baked Potato 

^ 95 

Per Person 



my 

w 



Feb. 14 & 

Feb. ISy^rime Rib or 
"N:Y. Stnp Steak 
For Two 

Dinners include for each 
COMPUMBnARY GLASS OFCHAMPAGNE or WINE 
.SHRIMP COCKTAIL APPETIZER 
•SOUP "SALAD BAR -BAKED POTATO 



m 





u.. 587-3211 
Call For Reser vations 



Jet me 



e wayi 



Just call or visit 
us today to send 
the FTD® Hearts & 
Flowers Bouquet 



^^^^ffl 




VISA 




or the 

FTD Flower Basket 

Bouquet 



Aladdin Flower Shop 

291 1 Grand Ave., Waukegan j^ '^ <^ 



It's never too 
late to send one 






m 




^ii it;U=' ':^'' 



iiwm.ii,^iiun..«r,immjiuui\u'mLJ-it 







^ Treat your Valentine 
Special at Red Noodle 
Friday, Feb. 1 4th 
^ thru SundoA^, Feb. 






jacb 

^'trpitaoTB^Ked potato 

Choice otP^d 

Souse >N»T\e or 



Om Hut HJEu CUhhu Sfimd 



P-'^t^t Desserts 



u 



r- 



OnW 



$24.95 p*^^ 

leg. $34.40 



couple 





On Rt 83 - Just North of Roitins 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

(708)223-7010 



,.-Lji-,-r.XL— l...iiiil»fHl-JI. 




Treat Your Sweetheart 

Fridaij, Feb. Uth is Valentine's Day 

Chateaubriand for Two 

20 oz. Ftlet^ Complete Dinner. 

Steak Au Prlove, SLeak & Lobster, 
Filet w/Mushrooms & Onions, 
Grilled Swordflsh, or Chicken Vesuvio 

Choice of Above, Complete Dinner. •*-*-' 

All DlnnexB Indude: 4-Shrimp CocktnU Appetizer, 
Baked Onion Soup, Salad & Deeacrt 

Regular Menu Will Be Served 



CaU 3954803 

For Reservations 

Rte. 59 & Grass Lake Rd. 
Antioch, IL 




Restaurant &. Lounge 



-^^ 



aisi.^B;>^igjib.:-^#i 





Lalteland Newspapers 13 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 




^7^^yr^uuw^i^^yA^^^^am•■>*«>■^^^vUii^^«^aa^^..J 



^iaag Can't DO m^^aapMHedm 



Open ceremony 

The Lake County Bowting Assn. held its opening ceremony for the 63rd 
Annual Tournament at Bo's Bowl in Zion on Feb. 8. Pictured from left to right , 
are: Rudy Ahonen, life member; Bruce Kennedy, life member; Roland ■ 
Tekampe, executive director; Greg Lettengan/er, 4th vice president; Kermit 
Ewell, executive director; Jim Schultz, executive director; Doug Lorge, 3rd , 
vice president; John Miller, chairman; Dave Greenup; 1st vice president*,-; 
Ward Taylor, life member; Bob Voight, 2nd vice president. Not pictured: Joe " 
Pregrocki, Fred Sykes, executive directors; Jim Kessler, Earl Hogarij^-life 
members. For complete score standings refer to Page 49. ^J^ 



Dunesland society 40 meet* 




li,>«^ rlirln 



Gary Lang will match your 
m^down payment up to $1S00 
for a total of $3000 down on 

specially marked cars. 
And no payments til sprlngl 

r ~ — 





$10,995 

$500 

$1000 

$1000 




'91 Cadill;^ _ 
Sedan DeVille 

Original Price: 
Gary Lang Discount; 
Your Down Payment 
DOUBLE DOWN: 



YOU 
PAY: 



The Illinois Dunesland 
Preservation Society invites 
the public to their luncheon 

meeting at noon on Satur- 
day, Feb. 15 at the Madison 

Avenue Restaurant, 34 N. 
Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. 
Cliff Miller, formerly a 

naturalist at Ryerson Forest 
Preserve and who now 

operates a Lake Forest 
landscaping firm, will pre- 



sent a pictorial" review of- 
Lake Bluffs Sunrise Park 
progress in erosion restora- 
tion using native plant ma- 
terials. For luncheon reser- 
vaUons call (708)746-1090. 
In our area many have 
concerns about Lake 
Michigan shore line erosion 
and the various approaches 
to stabilizing the problem. 
Miller is a professional 
landscaper specializing in 



the use and restoration of 
native plan communities. 
He is a member of the learn 
working on the erosion 

problem through the 
restoration of the Sunrise 
Park plant population. He 
has developed an interesting 

presentation of bluff 
restoration techniques and 

an introduction to history of 
bluff plant communities. 











We pick up your 
merchandise 



HELP THE 

SALVATION ARMY! 

\i will help you and it will help others! 

DONATE FURNITURE • CLOTHING • 

BRIC-A-BRAC • TV's • SMALL 

APPLIANCES ' BOOKS • SHOP 

EQUIPMENT • TOOLS • BOATS • 

OARS or TRUCKS. 

ALL DONATIONS TAX DEDUCTIBLE 



g?^- 



i0 



'69 CHEVY CAPRICE CUSSIC BROUGHAM 

Original Pfico '12.995 

Long Disc: M.OOO 

Your Down; MSOO 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1500 



WMPAHi 



( 







'89PONITAC6000LE 

Original Price '9495 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: 'lOOO 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1000 



yO\}PfC(: 



<M9S 



'88 CADILLAC COUPE DEVILLE 

Original pfico '14,495 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '1500 

DOUflLE DOWN: '1500 

"iOMPM: 




•86 BUICK PARK AVENUE 

Original Prioo '7695 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '1000 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1000 



f tBRUARY 12 - 22 
OVER 2.000 PAIR! 

PRE-WASHED & PRE-WORN 
ONLY $^00 

4# EACHI 

MEN ♦WOMEN ♦CHILDREN 

INCLUDING FAMOUS NAMES LIKE; 

LEVI, LEE, JORDACH... 

432 Sheridan Road • Waukegan, IL 
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
CALL 




V«rt?B/* 



LAKE COUNTY ^^^^ KENOSHA COUNTY 

(708) 662-7730 (41 4) 652-8022 

Area Thrift Store Locations^gf onvenient Drop Box Locations 
WAUKEGAN: KEp)SHAf^DK^fta: soe s. sheridan Rd. 

140 S. Sheridan Rd. 8005 Sfierldan Rd. - 'Wlutl^S 140 S. Sheridan Rd. 
(708) 623-6170 (414)16^-9151; ' . ; 

6114-^2hd Ave. ; 

Call for Plck-up;:\';f*' 

(414J'652'0D22 ' ''DEERplELD; Deerfield Rd.-First United Realty 

W\r^ ) I B AI=?F?f NGTON : RI. 14, Behind McDonalds 

ZiON: , ^: \ ; i"^ -■ • .^' * B^fger King 

2655 sfterldan Rdf FORT SHERIDAN 

(708) 872^566&^ ■ ARMV^SASE: PX Parking Lot In Front Of 

Commissary Bldg. 



1700 N. Lewis Ave, 
(708) 662-6440 



(Tues.-Sal. 9-5 p.m.) 
432 S. Sheridan Rd. 
(708) 662-7730 




6114-22ndAvB. 8005 Sheridan Rd. 
Sheridan Rd. 



;S4^^ 



.<^- 



A^' 



}■•■■- 






iOtiPfd'. 



t«9S 



'86 OLDS CALAIS COUPE 

Original Prico '5695 

Lang Disc: '500 

Your Down: '500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 

"iOUPM: 




'87 PLYMOUTH HORIZON 

Original Prico '4450 

Lang Disc: *500 

Your Down; '500 a* 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 G^ 

"iOUPM: ^ 




'87 DODGE CONQUEST TURBO 



Original Prico '7995 

Long Disc: '1000 

Your Down: 'lOOO 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1000 

. yO\iPf<i: 



t 



4SSS 




'90 CHEVY LUMINA EUROSPORT 



Original Prico 
Lang Disc: 
Your Down: 
DOUBLE DOWN 



youpkT. 



■86 CHEVY CELEBRITY 

Original Prico '6995 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '1000 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1000 

yOMPM: 



'89 BUICK PARK AVENUE 

Original price *1 3.995 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '1500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1500 

yOt/PAV; 



'87 CHEVY CELEBRITY 

Original Price '5995 

Lang Disc; 'SOO 

Your Down: '500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 

WiiPM: 



'86 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE 

Original Prico '7995 

Lang Disc: '500 

Your Down: '500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 

YQUPky-. 




'86 PONTIAC SUNBIRD SE COUPE 

Original Price '4695 

Lang Disc: '500 

Your Down: '500 d 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 El 

fOUPMi - 



'84 TOYOTA TERCEL WAGON 4 WD 

Orrginal Prico '4495 

Lang Disc: 'SOO 

Your Down: '500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 

yOUP4K: 



'89 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 

Original Prico '10,995 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '1500 

DOUBLE DOWN! '1500 

"iOliPKi: 



v 



^^ 



•90 FORD ESCORT LX 4 DR. 



Original Prico '7295 

Lang Disc: '1000 

Your Down: '100O 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1O00 

you PAY: 



m 






'87 FORD ESCORT 

Original Prico '2995 

Lang Disc: '500 

Your Down: '500 

DOUBLE DOWN: '500 



YOU PAY: 



m 



'89 NISSAN 4X4 TRUCK 



Original Prico 
Lang Disc: 
Your Down; 
DOUBLE DOWN: 



'11.595 
'1000 
'1500 
•1500 



YOU PAY: 




'90 FORD TEMPO GL 

Original Prico '8995 

Lang Disc; '1000 

Your Down: '1000 

DOUBLE DOWN: '1000 





W^ 










14 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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the flowers and lace, what is love? 



"jt's February. Valentine's Day. Time for 
Jwlilspcring sweet notliings, giving flowers and 
j romance. Time for hearts to go pitter patter. 

Songwriters and poets have been defining love 
for centuries. Bade in 1964, the 
composer/lyricist team of Sammy Cahn and 
James Van Ileusen said love's a bore. A ball game without a 
score. lx»ve is a sailboat without a sail, they said. The lock 
on the candy store. 

It's "I'll call you tomorrow." It's a phone that never 
rings. It's a sack full of sorrow on a ride on angel's wings. 

They also said to remember the next time you soar, love 
is an exit without a door; but if you're in love you'll ignore 
all the things that they said. 

diet Atkins sang in 1968 about the birds and the bees 
and the flowers and the trees and the moon up above, but 
he never gave love a dePmition. About the same time, 
emotional conflict was spotlighted and composer/lyricist 
Chct Powcre said love is but a song we sing. Before things 
got complicated, poet Robert Burns simply said his love is 
like a red, red rose. 

Like the fortune in a cookie, it's all relative, which is a 

good thing because far above the battlefields of love and 

drunk wines of paradise, love sits upon the choicest of 

church scats. 

Love isn't born, it's made, said poet Rod McKuen. Feed 



it lullabies and you'll get lullabies in 
return. LUcc the firelight's first warm glow, 
love is a thing that needs to grow. Feed it 
jelly beans, treat it kind and happiness 
you will find, he said. Listen to the warm, 
he said. "With love, it's either famine or 
feast. You've got to learn to smile at least," 
he wrote. 

For love is blind all day and may not 
see, said Geoffrey Chaucer. Love Is the 
beginning of knowledge as fire is of light, 
claimed Thomas Carlyle. 




Snowdrops instead of roses? 



2 




Quite simply, the English 
say that birds choose their 
mates on Valentine's Day. 
Therefore it is a day to 
celebrate love. 

Marking the day, English 
poet Geoffrey Chaucer in 
the 1300s wrote "For this 
was on St. Valentine's Day, 
/When* every fowl cometh 
there to choose his mate." William 
Shakespeare also followed the belief as 
4emonstrated in "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream" when a character in the play 
discovers two lovers in the woods and 
asks, "St. Valentine is past; /Begin these 
woodbirds but to couple now?" 

The origin of the holiday can be traced 
to the ancient Romans, however the 
designation seemingly was made by early 
Christians. Customs; which include 
whipping people, date back to the Roman 
Empire. 

According to World Book Encyclopedia, 
the ancient Romans held the festival of 
Lupcrcalia on Feb. 15 to insure protection 
from wolves. During this celebration, 
young men struck people with strips of 
animal hide. Women took the blows 



because they thought the 
whipping made them more 
fertile. The festival of 
Lupercalia has been linked 
with Valentine's Day because 
of the similar date and the 
connection vrith fertility. 

Antique valentine 
collector Gladys Loomis of 
unincorporated Fremont 
Township added this insight: "In lime the 
wolves died out and the pagans were rid 
of their plague but they kept their holiday. 
It was just a plain celebration, no cards, 
none of that sort of thing." 

Lupcrcus, the god to whom the Romans 
prayed to rid them of a plague of wolves, 
lost favor in the eye of the Romans once 
the animals were gone. Their worship was 
then turned to Juno, queen of the Roman 
gods who ruled over love and marriage, 
Loomis said. Cupid, the god of love, took a 
backseat to the queen. 

Now Roman Emperor Claudius II, who 
ruled In the A.D. 200s, forbade young men 
to marry because he believed single men 
made better soldiers. A priest named 
Valentine disobeyed the emperor's order 
(Continued on page 21) 



^BS 



^assrzs 



What more can be said? In the 
immortal words of playwrlte Henry 
Fielding, love and scandal are the best 
sweeteners of tea. 

Dr. Leo Jacobs, medical director of 
adult psychiatric services at Good 
Shepherd Hospital in Barrington, said love 
is "something you climb into ratlier than 
fall into; and love is not noedincss." 

At one time or another, each one of us 
struggles to define love for ourselves. 
Pondering romantic love, infatuation, 
feelings of deep attachment and bonding 
to another person, caring and compassion 
for anotlier person, desiring feelings of 
affection and emotional intimacy with 
that other person can become an 
obsession at any ago, given the right 
conditions. 

"We all agree (love) involves an affinity 
for (another) person; a desire and longing 
to be with tliat person," said Barrington- 
based psychologist Paul Gorcckl. 

"Wliat love is not is dependency. It 
Involves dependability versus 
dependency. It's a good thing to be 
dependable, but not to depend on 
someone emotionally," he said. 
"Dependency often involves a fear of not 
having that person. Love is the half full 
glass of water. Dependency would be the 
fear diat (tlic glass) would be empty." 

A short circuit In reasoning could result 
from infatuation, but once that settles 
down, "you have love as friendship, which 
includes the ability to communicate, to 
show respect and feci respected. It 
requires knowing what you're responsible 
for and what the other person is 
responsible for," said Ronald Rosenthal, a 
Libcrtyville-based clinical psychologist. 

Love is a matter of accepting die other 
person, he said. "It means being able to 
listen and to appreciate but also to know 
what to do for oneself, because you have 
to be able to love yourself to be able to 
give of yourself. You can't have the otlicr 



person be so totally responsible for 
making you feel good. You have to accept 
yourself. 

"Love isn't hormones racing or 
possession," he said. "Love is not 
spending all your time and expectbig all 
your pleasure to come from one person, 
and love is not having someone as a 
showpiece," Rosenthal said. 

Trapping someone In the confines of 
jealousy and possessivness is not love 
cither, according to William Lee, a cllncal 
psychologist in Waukcgan. "Imposition of 
one's values on the other person is not 
love, selfishness is not love, disrespect is 
not love. Sex is not love. Eitlier buying or 
desiring material things is not a sign of 
Jove," he said. 

Material things when used as a 
manipulation, with a "you owe me" 
attached no matter how subtUy, breaks 
down communication, he said. 

Giving material things could be a 
means of validating a feeling, or an 
expression of inadequacy, but giving as a 
pure reflection of one's feelings is non- 
verbal communication in its purest forrrt 
"If a person has a discomfort with verbally 
expressing their feelings, tliey may do so 
in a subtle fashion, which can be by giving 
material things. That's not necessarily 
bad. It becomes bad when there's some of 
the manipulative aspects to it, like when 1 
want a favor, you need to keep this gift in 
mind and pay me back somehow, whether 
it's fishing with the boys or getting out of 
going to the in-laws," lie said. 

Love Is a strong emotion that has 
meaning in terms of self-validation, he 
said. "It helps define who you are as a 
person, particularly as to whellier you can 
handle relationships, meet each others 
needs, have diem meet your needs. It's 
also powerful because it can lead to 
feelings of rejection, depression and loss 
of self-esteem," he saSd. 

Dispelling fairy talcs and legends about 
love, Lee said it sometimes creates 
assumptions between two people. "If you 
love me, then you'fl be able to read my 
mind, know what I want, know what my 
needs are. That's a fallacy. It's a myth of 
love and it creates obvious 
communication problems," 

Imagine: Slowly, and in silence the mist 
absorbs the lakes and the hills, birds fly 
out of nowiierc and back into nowhere 
again, there is intimacy in the soft air ... 
Author Gwcn Frostic said these things are 
ours for a fleeting moment and then they 
are ours forever. But is It love? 



Friday, February U, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 15 



Tii 




A Blue Valentine party will be celebrated at Slice of Chicago featuring prizes, flowers 
and blues music. 

Ladies visiting either the restaurant or bar will receive a free rose compliments of 
Pamela's Flower Basket in Palatine, At midnight, a drawing will be held for a weekend 
getaway at tlie Hyatt Regency Woodfleld Hotel in Schaumburg. 

Providing the mood for the evening wiU be Howard & the White Boys starting at 10 p.m. 
The band plays Chicago blues covers as well as energetic originals. There is a $5 cover. 



Slice of Chicago is located at 36 S. Northwest Hwy., Palatine. CaU 991-2150. 

Friday, Valentines Day . • 

singer Trish Schaefer with pianist AugleWegner will feature love songs by composers 
such as Cole Porter and George Gershwin at Di Marco's Restaurant, 883 Main St., Antloch, 
395-8883...Jak Makral will open for Duke Tomato, R & B. at Shades, 21860 Milwaukee Rd.. 
Deerfield, 634-BLUE...Country lovers can check out Southern Strut at Sundance Saloon, 
Rtes. 176 and 83, Mundeleln, 949-0858...Eclipsc will perform Pink Floyd and Genesis 
tunes at Cocktails, 20473 Rand Rd., Palatine, 438-5600 

Saturday 

Studebaker John and the Hawks at OTralna's, 110 Main St., Wauconda, 526-4499...DIon 
Payton, blues, at Slice of Chicago.,.Southern Strut at Sundance SaloDn...LUtle Mike & the 
Tornadoes at Shades... Kids Slam, rock 'n' roll, at Cocktails with opening band Swift 
Kick.— CLAUDIA M. LENABT 





VViiether, your searching to expand your child's horizons through education or 
entertainment the resources to do so exist here in Lake County. 

Polkadot Puppeteers 

For a Saturday morning of entertainment that will stimulate the imagination check 
out the performance of "Tlie Polkadot Puppeteers." They will take the stage Feb, 22, 
at the Stage Two Tlieater in Waukcgan as the third installment in the theater's "Super 
Saturday," children's series. 

Donna Casey and her puppet friends v^nll bring to life before the audience's young 
eyes the talcs of Red Riding Hood and otlier childhood favorites. The puppeteers will 
also involve tlie audience in hands-on puppeteering. 

TWo performances arc scheduled beginning at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Admission Is 



$3. The Stage TWo Theater Company is located at 12 N. Sheridan Road in Waukegan. 
For Reservations and Information contact the theater at, 662-7088, 

Young Musicians in Motion 

The David Adler Cultural Center in Libertyvillc is accepting registrations for Young 
Musicians in Motion, an introductory music class for three to five-year-olds. 

The class is based upon the system of music education developed by Carl OrfF. 
"It's pre-instrumcntal training that is essential to helping children develop the 
concepts of rhythm and melody," said Muriel Schornack of the cultural center. "The 
concepts are essential for children that are going to study a musical instrument" 

The study of Orff-Schulwcrk will help children develop concepts of pitch and 
melody, rhythm and pulse through singing, chanting, dancing and clapping. 
Students also learn to accompany themselves on pitched and non-pitched 
percussion instruments. 

According to Schornack the development of these concepts are essential 
prerequisites for tlie study of a particular instrument Knowledge of these musical 
concepts will help students as tliey begin studying an instrument because they are 
then able to concentrate on tlie technical aspects and fine muscle coordination 
necessary to produce the melodic sounds. 

The cost is $85 for 10 weeks for non-members and $75 for member. For 
information contact the center at 367-0707.— by RHONDA VINZANT 



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16 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. February 14. 1992 



h, 



n 

lie 



t 



• 




eland Leisure 



Art auction 

The LMS Art Auction, sponsored by 
Libertyville Montcssorl School, will be 
I held at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15 at 
the Gorton Community Center, 400 R 
Illinois Rd., In Lake Forest The New 
York based auctioneering firm, State of 
the Art, will present 175 pieces 
including artwork by Chagall, Ertcs and 
Picasso. Proceeds will benefit the 
Libertyville Montessorl School in the 
purchase of playground equipment 
and educational supplies. Tickets arc 
$10 and may be obtained by calling 
Marge Cramer at (708)362-5170. 

Art camps 

The David Adler Cultural Center Is accepting 
advance registration for a special art camp 
experience for children to be held this summer. 
Children who have an interest In art arc offered 
an opportunity to spend tree days a week 
drawing, painting, sculpting and exploring 
special craft projects. This camp is for children 
nine to 11. Participants meet from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.nx, 'I\icsday, Wednesday and Thursday, Cost 
Is $225 per session. Call (708)367-0707 for 
further information. 



Buoys and Belles 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance Club 
is sponsoring 'Mardl Gras Fling' on 
Friday, Feb. 21. Dancing fromB:30 to 11 
p.m. with round dance workshop from 
8 to B:30 p.m. and a plus tip at 11 p.m. 
TTie dance will be held at First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. Utlca St, 
Waukcgan. For further Information call 

(708)662-6546. 

Valentine^s dance 

ic Northlakc Singles group is holding a 
^^cntlnc's Day dance for all single people on 
Friday, Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. at the AnUoch Golf 
Course banquet rooms. More than three singles 
clubs will be represented. A live band will 
provide the cntertalruncnL Call (708)587-0702 
or (708)395-5833 for more Information. 



'Cabin Fever Jazz' 

Tickets arc available for "Cabin Fever 
Jazz," Sundays at Gorton Conununlty 
Center, 400 E Illinois Rd., Lake ForesL 
Four concerts featuring professional 
traditional and Jazz bands are set for 
February through April, On Feb, 16, 
Banjo Buddies Dbdcland Jazz Band, 
March 1, the Red Rose Ragtime Jazz 
Band, followed by Six Friars and a 
Monk on March 29 and the Rivcrboat 
Ramblers on April 12. Concerts will be 
presented fireside in the Community 
Room from 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets arc $10 each, $15 
at the door. For reservations call (708)234-6060 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday tlirough 
Friday. 



Ciiamber concert 

Lake Forest College will host a chamber music 
concert on Feb. 18. Music selections will 
Include Beethoven's and Shostakovich's string 
quartets, as performed by PartUura Chamber 
Music The 10:30 a.m. convocation concert and 
lecture, wdll be held at the College's Lily Rcid 
Holt Memorial Chapel, Middle Campus, 
Sheridan and College Rds. For further 
hiformatlon caU (708)234-3100, exL 259. 





One-woman show 

The legendary life of Harriet Tlibman, 
famous underground railroad 
conductor and freedom fighter, will be 
dramatized In an one-woman 
theatrical production by stage and 
screen actress Saundra Dunson Franks. 
The program, "Hats: A Tribute to 
Harriet TYibman," will be presented at 8 
p.ra, Friday, Feb. 21 in the College of 
Lake County auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington Stk, Grayslakc. Tickets arc 
$6 general admission, $3 for CLC 

students. Call (708)223-6601, ext 300 for Uckct 

information. 

'Romance/Romance' 

Romance/Romance Is a pair of one-act 
musical comedies exploring love and its 
illusions from both a contemporary and 
historical perspective now playing at The Apple 
Tree, 595 Elm PL, Highland Park. Show limes 
arc Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.; Fridays at 8 p.m.; 
Saturdays at 6 and 9 p.m and Sundays at 3 p.m 
Tickets arc $18 and $20, CaU (708)432-4335 for 
reservations. 

'The Runner Stumbles' 

Opening night for PM&L*s production of 
"The Runner Stumbles" vwll be Friday, Feb. 14 
at 8 p.m. Other show dates are Feb. 15, 21, 22, 
28 and 29 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 16, 23 and March 1 
at 2:30 p.m. The theater Is located at 877 Main 
St, Anlloch. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for 
senior citizens and students. For reservations 
call (708)395-3055. 

'What the Butler Saw' 

The Bowen Park Theatre Co. will feature 
"What the Butler Saw" a farce for mature 
audiences by Joe Orton. The play, a hilarious, 
fast-paced free-for-all of love, lechery, and 
lunacy Is set In a London psychiatric 
Institution, an dls being directed by Mark 
HcUcr. The play begins at 8 p.m. on Feb. 28 and 
runs weekends through March 14. Call 
(708)360-4741 for fmther Information. 



'Stormy Night' 



St Peter U.C.C. Players arc in rehearsal for 
thch- production of "It Was A Dark And Stormy 
Night" This mystery/comedy will be presented 
on Friday, Feb. 21 at 8 p.ni Donations will be $4 
for adults, $2 for senior citizens and children 10 
and under. On Saturday, Feb. 22 and Friday, 
Feb. 28 there will be dinner/theater 
combination at 6:30 p.m. with donations of $15 
for adults and $12 for seniors and children. Call 
(708)438-7869 for rcsenratlons. 

Auditions 

Auditions for PM&L's next production 
"Brighton Beach Memoirs" written by Nell 
Simon directed by Mickey Mandel on Feb. 16 at 
7 p.m. and Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m Four females 
ages 13 to 45. The theater is located at 877 Main 
St, Antloch. For further Information call 
(708)395-2096, 



Public reading 

Author Lee K. Abbott will give a 
public reading on Wednesday, Feb. 19 
at 8 p.m. at Lake Forest College. The 
artlst-ln-resldence program is 
coordinated by LFC's English Dept and 
is made possible by the Hugo S. 
Sonnenschein Memorial Fund. For 
further informaUon caU (708)234-3100, 
ext 259. 




Solo events 

Solo for singles will sponsor the following events: Watch and discuss John Bradshaw video 
tapes, series on relationships from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16; volleyball at Highland 
School, Rockland Rd., UbertyvlUc from 7 to 10 p.m. onlbesday, Feb. 18; "Puttln* on the Hits" 
lip sync contest at the Princess restaurant. Hwy. 21, Libertyville at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19; 
and Solo Super Party on Friday, Feb. 21 at the Holiday Inn Mundcleln, Hwy, 45 and 60, from 
8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. There will a live band and a disc jockey. For further events or hiformatlon 
call (708)816-1011. 

Membership campaign 

Lake County Community Concert Assn. will open lis membership campaign for Its 39th 
season. Five concerts will be ofercd. All concerts arc held at Waukcgan High School 
^^^. auditorium, 2325 Brooksldc. Memberships arc solde direcUy by volunteer workers. For the 
forth-coming season, the price Is $30 for adults and $15 for students through high school age. 
AttracUons for the series will be The Dallas Brass; The Dale Warland Singers; New York Theatre BaUct 
presenting "Chideraila;" Dc Wayne FulUn, harpist; An Evening of Lcrner and Loewe with Tony 
Sandler. For further Information call Adrian Sprang at (708)356-1621. 

Mardi Gras '92 

Witness the color and pageantry of Mardl Gras, listen to the sounds of Dbdcland Jazz and smeU 
the cajun cooking as you sUoU down Bourbon St, go rivcrboat gambling at Prince of Peace Parish in 
Uke VUla on Friday, Feb. 28 and Saturday, Feb. 29. For more Information caU (708)356-1046. 




IS TfflS YOU AT 

TAX TIME? 




Get Your Tax QuLestions 

Answered - Attend 

Lakeland Newspapers' 

Annual Tax Seminar 

Wed., Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. 

In Room COOS at the 

College of Lake County 

In Grayslake 

Agent Sallie Goding of the Internal 
Revenue Service wiU spealt on tax reform 
and 1991 income tax regiilatLons. There 
wiU be ample time provided for 
individual questions. Questions about 
business taxes welcome. 

Seminar open to the public. No 
registration required. FREE admission. 
Sponsored by Lalteland Newspapers in 
conjunction with the College of Lake 
County and the Internal Revenue 
Service. For more ioformation, call 
Elizabeth Ebert at (708) 223-8161. 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 



1992 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Lakoland Newspapers 17 




1 VN^orld 



'Tomatoes' feeds on life 
using people for entree 

'During the cold and dreary month of January, 
when the newspaper headlines are even 
drearier, any bit of sunshine is more than 
welcome and "Green Fried Tomatoes" is the 
film industry's warming contribution. 

Using a tried and true Hollywood formula, a 
story full of heart and ingratiating characters to 
boot, "Tomatoes," rated PG13 by the way, takes 
a fresh view of the power of the imman soul 
laced with lots of comedy and romance. It*s 
warm, whimsical, wacky besides being a little 
soul-searching. 

This picture stars four excellent actresses led 
by two Academy Award winners, Jessica Tandy 
("Driving Miss Daisy,") and Kathy Bates 
("Misery.) 

Despite this formidable company, Mary Stuart 
Masterson steals the show. 

Ms. Masterson and Mary-Louise Paricer, who 
also turns in a fine performance, are the stars of 
Ms. Tandy's flashback. Mary Stuart Masterson, Mary Louise 

Ms. Bates, a frustrated and unhappy chubby Parer, Kathy Bates, Jessica Tandy 
middle-aged housewife, meets Ms. Tandy when she volunteers to visit nursing home 
clients. 

Then we meet the powerful characters portrayed by Ms. Stuart and Ms. Parker as Ms. 
Tandy reminisces about life and its prejudices In a small Georgia town in the 1940s. We 
see how the tale of two ladles' fight against racial and sexual prejudice changes Ms. Bates 
boring and unsatisfying life. 

On a smaller scale than tlie larger cast of "Steel Magnolias," these four ladies come into 
the audience's heart with a crescendo and probably will never leave their memory. 

We give "Tomatoes" 4.5 stars out of five with a slight subtraction for the hackney use of 
the flashback.— by GLORIA DAVIS 





Was it a conspiracy? 



Antloch detective Ernie Rlzzo, right, discusses ttie assassination of President 
John Kennedy with the star of 'JFK,' Kevin Costner, at the film's opening. Rizzo 
met Costner at a wrap party for 'Lethal Weapon 3' staring Mel Gibson and 
Danny Glover. Rlzzo has a small part playing a detective In "Weapon." 



Andre's serves comic tomatoes 

Andre's Steakhousc and Rosebud 
Productions arc serving up their second 
offering for their dinner/theatre season, 
"A Bad Year For Tomatoes," a comedy by 
John Patrick. 

The plot of the show revolves around 
the idea of an aging actress who retires 
from the crazy world of Hollywood to a 
quiet New England village to write her 
memoirs only to be invaded by a zany 
group ofhome-grown bad tomatoes. How ^^^^j^l^fT; Colleen Jordan. Larry 
she deals with their crazy antics and her gersle and AJIeen Blel rehearse in "A 
romance with two men will have Bad Year for Tomatoes." 
audiences laughing away the winter blues. 

The show is running weekends through Feb. 22. Call (815)678-2671 for 
Information and reservations. 




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Just For The Love Of It 
Play the Lotto 



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Your Offtdal 
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SHOREWOOD RD., ROUND LAKE 



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Roee^iad PMdloLctms 1992 

DINNER/THEATRE SEASON: 




February 13, 14 J 6 
21 &22 

''A BAD TEAR 
FOR TOMATOES" 

a rolicking, rustic comedy 
by John Patrick 



/%fUJbW(^' STEAK AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 
CaU 815/678-2671 



1/2 Mile North of RL 173 On U.S. 12 

Richmond, IL 



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SALEM (PADDOCK LAKE). WISCONSIN 53K 



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Ii«kddc, IL CFox lakt) 

Live Entertainment 
|l^ Every Wed., FrI., Sat. 

Music brought to you 

by PHA2E II 

Productions 

featuring this week 

PHAZEII 

WEDNESDAY 
NIGHT 

OPEN MIC & 
TALENT SEARCH 

Wednesday Night Is 
Fun Night At The 
Black Bear Chalet 




VALENTINE'S WEEKEND fS 
CELEBRATION H 

Feb. 14-15-16 U 

For young lovers, an evening of •;"} 

candleli^t dining featuring a i^ 

complimenlary bottle (split) of M 

champagne w/ith our 'aJ 

CHATEAUBRIAND FOR TWO ^ 

(Carved Tables ide) -^ 

Or Ciioose From Our g 

•Mixed Platter For IWo 

or •-' 

. 'BBQ Combination For TWo 

or 

•2 Lbs. Snow Crab Cluster 

or 

•I Lb. Snow Crab Cluster 

TOP OFF YOUR DINNER WITH OUR 

SWEETHEART DESSERTS 

Cheny Parfail Or Chocolate Eclair 

Pink Squirrel or GoJdcn Cadillac 

STAY FOR AN EVENING OF 

FTERGLOWAND DANCING 






Reservations are sugested 
and appreciated 

,(708) 58 7-7933 



EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 

3PM- 5PM 

MONDAY • SATURDAY 

SH. CITIZEN 10% DISCOUNT 






i 



Concerned Care For Your Eyes 

We specialize in eye surgery to treat or 
correct eye problems related to age, illness or 
injury. Our patient benefits from the most 
modern, approved surgical techniques 
available, such as 

•No-stitch cataract surgery and implants 

•Laser surgery for problems related to 
diabetes, glaucoma and other conditions that 
may cause vision impairment or loss 

•Surgery to halt progressive adult 
nearsightedness that may lead to blindness 

Free Transportation • Medicare Assignments Accepted 

214 Washington St. 

Ingleside, IL 60041 

587-3012 




Robert L Epstein, M.D. 
Director 




The Center for 



CORRE CTI VE 

EYE SURGERY 



ZSE 



■"■ *^^— r 



16 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14. 1992 



LaJkelife 



ACROSS 

I. Beer 
6. Sticks of a 
son 

11. Irish or Idaho 

12. Descriptive 
poetns 

14. French 
sclioois 

15. Annul 

16. Sunhaiher's 
goal 

1 7. Manier of 



30. Hubbub 

31. Makes beloved 
35. Inhibit 

39. Duroclier and 
namesakes 



40. Exclamation 

42. Middling 

43. After Nov. 

44. Bantu language 
46. Greek vowel 



;citoii 



19. Chemical 
suffix 

20. Israeli port 

22. Dine 

23. Suffix with 
kitchen 

24. Type of race 
26. Bestseller: 

"Mommie, — ' 
28. Vintage car 




47. Inventor: 
'Hiotnas — 

49. Report card 
notations 

51. Trusted 

52. Famed 
inimpetcr 

53. Belittle 

54. Horses 
DOWN 

1. Milieu 

2. Lacking tone 

3. Sal, for one 

4. Riviera 
seasons 

5. Girl's 
nickname 

6. Stolen 
7. 1'indaric 

works 

8. .Swindle 

9. Type of ester 

10. Leans 
U. Type of 



f 





We're proud to lend our support to the organi- 
zation that contributes to the development of 
our youth and the progress of our community. 
FFA offers interested young people the 
opportunity to learn and prepare for careers in 
agriculture, while partaking in worthwhile 
projects. We salute them one and all! 




&tg!^/ Lcader^/Up 

ly^'^ for a growing 
pldnct 



*«^^^ 



giving the earth a break | 

NATIONAL FFA 

_________ February 

W£/£/lv 15-22. 1992 



NORTHWEST AUTO 
ELECTRIC, INC. 

Manufacturer of Slarters-Alternalors & Genetators 
Heavy Duly Aulomolive Marino Specialists 

(815) 385-92U0 - 1312 N. Riverside Dr. 
McHenry 



ALL AMERICAN 
ROOFING COMPANY 

For All Your Roofing-Slding & GuUer Needs 

Proudly Saluting Our FFA Kids 

438-4131 - 310 Telser Road 
Lake Zurich 



SMITH ELECTRIC COMPANY 

In Business Over 40 Years 

Industrial • Commercial - Residential 

Hats Off to Our FFA 

438-2433 -Lat(e Zurich 

NW Corner of lUlllter & Route 12 



FREMONT CENTER 
FEEDS. INC. 

Purina Chows - Custom Mixes 
Keep Up The Good Work FFA Members 
223-0204-22438 W, Erhart Rd. 
MundelQln 



ELGIN MEDI- 
TRANSPOET, INC. 

S(dutin£ Our 'Dedicated !FtF^ QdcmBers 
359 Broolc St. 
Blgin, IIv 




OLYMPIC 
PACKAGING, INC. 

HONORING OUR FFA MEMBERS 

5M-6760 - Mundeleift 
XIS East Hawley St. 



RON'S MUNDELEIN 
HOBBIES 

Lake County's Largest Full Line Hobby Stiop 

Specializing In Model Rallroadlng-Radlo 

Control Vehicles 

949-B680'431 N. Lake • Mundeleln 



^5 



_ IHVEL INC. 

open 7 Days -5 Nights 

All Trawl Plans & Arrangomonts • Vacalions & Business 

20 OUier Localiom 10 Serve Your Needs, 

309 Howlhorn Center Gurncc MUIb 

Vernon Hilb Gurnce 

367-0111 855-0111 



PAUl A. SCIIWEGEL 

SavmsJouT RctmniinQ & Tcvc9^ecCs With. 
'ETfCcUtnu ifor 36 Tears 

(815)385-4410-4817W.EIm 
McHenry 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney Street 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 883-8161 



principle? 
13. WcalhtT 

fiirccasl 
18. Youtli 
21. Vetches 
2.1. Sea birtls 
2.*i. Affiniuiiivc 



vole 
27. Help 


33. Taine 

34. Oriental 


severely 
4 1 . Poe or 


29. IDre.ss 

iiiuleri.'il 
.U.C'htircli 
- |HTSi>iiaye 

32. Lacketl 


currency 

36. Walked like 
a pigeon 

37. Conipouniiij 

38. Criiici7,c 


Guest 
44. Traveler 
4.'). Guihrie 
4R.'nius(l..) 
50. H.xcliini!tlion 



Answers 

on 
page 42 



AKII->; (MmkIi 21 -April l<J) Yimj 
iii;ty sliaki- ytxtr licatl :i( llii" jxtwcr 
]%]ttys lli:il i'.i> nil tills week, l^-l tliciii 

|i:iss you liy, iirit! yini will Ix; n loi 
inppicr. I'liiii nil ji c(v/.y Valcnline's 
D.iy wiili your lu'iirtlliroh ... cluini- 
{tngiiL* mill :i woitck-rrul diiiikT nt Ikmiic 
iiils the s|)t>t, C'oiiiil im n loiiguiuloidil- 
ly wcL'kciui, 

'I'AUKU.S- (Ai>ril :0-M;iy 20) Wlu-li 
yon wriic your niciiiaiis.iliis week will 
sinml out iis t>iK' of your favorilL's. You 
•ire iicrsoii:ilMy-)>liis all week lout!. 
Yunr seiisiiivc L-iiinniiitiit.Miitig lins 
wlial you waiii (wltiiiever itiat is) toiii- 
hling into your 1:r|i an ilic wvi-kirnd 
comes. You know iIk' iiri-t-tifjil ol'llif 
preen pasKircs. 

GKMINI (M:iy 2\-hmti 20) Take a 
deep brealli iicl'ore yoit eiiergi/.e. Your 
iiingnelic field is (|iiile |Hiwerfiil this 
week. Just Ik- carerul where, and at 
wliotn, you toss ii. You are inasier of 
your own falc rtj-'ln now, \x-l po of a 
difUciilt .siliKilioti wlii-re another must 
have ii 'their wav'. 

CANCKR CJiine 2 1 -July 22J You 
cliinh the liigliesi jHMk, l>iil yon also 
travel tlie lowe.st altyss this week. Yon 
may feel as if you're al the mercy of 
another's whints. "J'ake cunnnaiiil of 
yotir ship and. even if there is a .stan- 
doff, yon conie out the winner. Hc- 
.sides.you findout how lovable you arc 
— all weekend long. 

LICO (July 23-Aupits( 22) Count on 



YOUR HOROSCOPE 



really being tioiiced this week, nnd 
you'll Iv ready Cor wliat g<vs on. I.eo 
is the sign of the lover and im one is 
surprised by all the aileiiiiotiatidailtila- 
lioti yon receive. Make the tnitsi onl of 
lite monieni, yon big pnssyeai. You'll 
Ite curled up and wanu idl weekend 
long. 

VIUCO (Augnsi 2.V.SepiemlHT 22) 
C.'ateb what's going on hihirul the 
scenes this week Ivlure you launch 
into action, 'I'iuh' ttno your higher 
values and more loving sidr. ("ollow 
llirougli on the pursuit (irh;t|i|)inessali 
week long, and ynu are in fur a 
(lynamile Valeiiline's Day. aiul day 
ul'ler, and day afler and ... 

I41UtA (.S*e|iieinkT 2.<()elotier 22) 
'I'ogelhenie.ss is the name of llie game 
this Valeritine'.s week. You gel the lull 
meaning as you play Uonieo {or Juliet) 
and delight those who cherisfi and 
adore you. Take a risk, jnmp thrtnigli 
the fiery Inwp k-fore the weekend, atui 
you'll have a woiiderriil Valeiiline's 
weeketttl. 

SCORPIO (OeiolK-r 2>-Novemtvr 
21)'ninugh you're a 'tongir sign (and 
can do cpiite well alone), this isn't ihe 
ease this week, Oi hers seek you out and 
waul to Ik- with yon. Yon iliseover just 
how )x>pnhtr you really are. Now ytmr 
biggest job is Ur choose among all 
those Valentines. For liest results — 
tell it like il is. 

SACriTARIUS (November 22- 



Dcceiulwr 2 1 ) You just may opt lor an 
early weekend as op|)ortniuty arises. If 
you're willing to Iv; le.ss donniiaiing 
nnd go with another's progniin. you 
may ueiiially get a gititipse of riirvatia. 
'lite real iiuesliou is. .Sag. can yon let 
go of your need lo coiitrxl'.' I lo|»c .so ... 
for yoii. ■ *- 

CAI'RICORN (December 22- 
iarniary I'J) Your amorous ways keep 
coming out :!ll week long at the mosi 
inopportune moments, tlei back lo 
your old practical .self and take care of 
the 'musts' liefore die weekend, when 
ynu launch into a very .sifccial and 
loving period. 'Ilie inilialion starts on 
Valentine's Day. 

AQUARIUS (Jaiuiary 20-1-dbruary 
18) You're slow gelling siancd this 
week, bill once ymi do. yini're a force 
lo Ik- (leall with. C'Ihhim" lo share your 
witdesi Ihougbis wjdi a loved one. ttn- 
agiiie ihe results and you nndersiaiid 
why you're so exhausted litis weekend. 
Never fear, you couie back again, ill 
even lieiter form, 

VlSCVJi (I'eltruary IQ-Marcli 20) 
You can talk a bine streak this week. It 
yon exiKci changes, you are likely lo 
find ytiiirscif gliirn as the weekend ap- 
|H-at^. Why tiol accept what is atid give 
another ihe s|>ace in move and grow'.' 
You can kttuile roniaiice lo its tnie 
passionaie levels that way. 

Cl'.VJ liy Kiiie Ki'wliin.« Syii.l 



r MOST BEAUTIFUL BABY CONTEST 

4 AGE DIVISIONS D- 7nno.;8-14mo .; 15-23 nno.; 24-36 nno. 
PrctUesl EycvS p^^^S^ j np* . 

Personality Plus ^fi^^ YOUT Baby? 

ALSO BEAUTY & TALENT CONTEST 
7 Age Divisions From 3 Yrs thru 25 Yrs 

Being held at the Diplomat, Gtirnee, Sun., Feb. 23 

For more information or an entry form, please call 

NEW STAR DISCOVERY 356-1531 



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1992 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 19 



- j'i_c:i.SL\c3:rurr;ij rtz--. 




There 



FRIDAY 



PWP invites singles 

Parents Without Partners (PWP) Invites ail single 
parents to their general meeting Friday, Feb. 14 at 
Buckleys restaurant, Rtcs. 21 and 137, LiberlyvUIe. 
Newcomers are welcomed at 8:30 for an orientation and 
social. Call (708)566-0306 for further information. 



SATURDAY 



MADD to meet 

The next scheduled meeting of the Northeast III. Chapter of 
Mothers Against Dmnk Driving (MADD) will take place Saturday. 
Fob. 15 at 11 a.m. at the Fremont Public Library in Mundelcin. 
This meeting will be held In the Fort Hill meeting room. 
Concerned citizens who would like further information can call 
(708)918-7775. 



SUNDAY 



Baseball card show 

There will be a baseball card show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Mundelcin Holiday Inn. Students from 
Washington School will also be sponsoring a bake sale. 



MONDAY 



Talk on vegetarian diets 

The O'Plain Unit of the Lake County Homcmakcrs Assn. will 
meet at the home of Gwcn Wirth at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb, 
17. Eleanor Pocius will give the lesson "Meatless Meals and 
Vegetarian Diets." For more information and directions call 
(708)223-8627. 

Founders Day meeting 

The Zion Genealogical Society meets at 7 p.m. on Monday, 
Feb. 17 at East School, 2913 Elim Ave., Zlon. This is the society's 
13lh annual Founders Day meeting. Members will share their 
family mementos and treasures. For more information contact 
Betty at (708)623-6569. 



TUESDAY 



Rock talk 

The Lake County Gem and Mineral Society meeting will be 
held at the Waukegan Public Library, 129 N. County Sl, Waukegan 
at 7 p.m on TUesday, Feb. 18. Beverly Millard will be speaking on 
"Presenting a Rock Talk to Chlldrea" For more information call 
Beverly Millard at (708)623-3292. 



WEDNESDAY 



Sign language 

Spring Sign Language dasscs will start Wednesday, Feb. 19' 
and will run for 10 weeks at John Powers for the Hearing 
Impaired, 201 Havrthorn Pkwy., Vernon Hills. The classes will be 




• G«t iS'i oil Ihf trgtilli rickcl putt ei ptiienhnt onc'ol lh;,li)llo«>ng ahtn purcnaiiAg litkeli • tain ind tlip) Ircm 
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held from 7 to 8:30 p.m, otferlng beginning, Intermediate, and 
advanced sign classes in Signing Exact English. For Information 
and registration call Linda Groenwald at (708)680-8320. 

Just the facts 

Pat O'Brien will present eight major Indicators or preferences 
which are used dally when interacting wilh others personally or 
professionally at the Women In Management meeting, 1 1:30 a..m. 
on Wednesday, Feb. 19 at Buckley's restaurant, Rtcs. 21 and 137, 
Ubertyvillc. Cost for the lunch is $15 for members and guests, $20 
non-members. Call (708)566-5759 for further information. 

UAan League forum 

The Lake County Urban League will sponsor a forum on 
Sexual Harassment from 10 a.m, to noon on Wednesday, Feb. 19 
at the Lake County Urban League, 122 W. Madison SL, Waukegan. 
Representatives from the community along with other human 
services and legal representatives will make presentations. For 
more information call (708)249-3770 or {708)249-2810. 



THURSDAY 



Hypnosis clinics 

American Lung Assn. of Lake County presents Hypnosis 
Clinics In the Hampton Inn meeting room, 5550 Grand Ave., 
Gurnce. Smoking, fee Is $40, will be at 6:30 p.m. and Weight, fee is 
$40, at 8:30 p.m. Call (708)367-5864 to register. 

Exchange Club 

The Exchange Club of Grayslakc meets every Thursday at 
noon at Randell's Restaurant In Grayslake. Visitors and 
prospective members are Invited to Join the club for lunch and 
learn more about the Exchange. For more information and 
reservations contact Bob Wegge (708)223-0777, Monlka O'Connor 
(708)223-5547, or JoAnn Rilzwollcr (708)223-8161. 



COMING SOON 



4-H International night 

"Your Horizons Expand With 4-H in Command" Is the theme 
for the Lake County 4-H International Night scheduled for Friday, 
Feb. 21 at 7 p.m., at the Lake County Fairgrounds, Grayslakc. 



Visitors will have the opportunity to view cultural exhibits form a 
variety of countries. Ethnic entertainment and food Including a 
fabulous "breads of the world" table wUl be provided. Several 
foreign exchange students will be present to discuss their 
international experiences. Call (708)223-8627 for further 
Information. 



Cross country ski trip 



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Cruise to Europe 
by Freighter 

by JIM WARNKEhf, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Dogs crossing the Atlantic by freighter conjure up 
visions of eating gruel served on a tin plate and 
spending the night in a hammock strung between a 
couple of crates? 

Picture instead an air conditioned suite with double 
beds, large windows, separate sitting area and private 
bath. You'll dine on top cuisine with the ship's officers. 

There's also a private passengers lounge, library and 
swimming pool which you will have to share with all of 12 
other passengers. 

Don't, however, expect the kind of activities found on 
todays passenger cruise ships. About the most you can 
expect in the way of entertainment on a freighter is a 
piano and hopefully a passenger that can play it. 

So let's get to the details of what a freighter cruise is 
all about. 

Most passenger carrying freighters offer transatlantic 
sailings to Europe. A typical cruise is from 1 1 to 13 days 
one way. Round trip cruises last approximately 32 days 
which included several days at a port in Europe during 
which your ship serves as your hotel. If you want to 
extend your stay, you can arrange to book return 
passage on a later sailing. 

A one way crossing runs from *1,500 to *2,000 per 
person. A round-trip cruise is priced about twice that 
amount. Good news for you singles. Unlike cruise-ships, 
freighters usually don't charge a single supplement. 

Since you are sailing on a cargo carrying freighter, 
you can even take your car along I That Isn't included as 
free luggage, though. Figure about another M ,000. 

A freighter cruise can be an exciting and educational 
way to travel to Europe. I would, stress, however, a 
freighter should not be compared to todays modern 
cruise ships. It's true that a suite on a freighter is usually 
more luxurious than a typical cruise ship cabin and, with 
only 12 other passengers, crowds are not a problem. 
Still many people would find 12 days on a freighter 
boring, while others would find it to be an experience of 
a lifetime. 



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24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708)356-3010 



T^ 



A three-day cross-country ski trip to Eagle River, Wis., vydll be 
sponsored by the College of Lake County on Feb. 21, 22, and 23. 
Interested students should enroll for "Skllng-Cross Country" (PED 
122-048), a one-credit hour course. An organizational meeting 
will be held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, In the Physical 
Education Center, Room 705. Call (708)223-6601, exL 475 for 
further information. 

3-DSlioot 

The Waukegan Bowmen Archery Qub's annual 3-D Shoot vrill 
be held on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 22 and 23. Registration Is 
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Trophies will be awarded, breakfast and 
lunch will be available. The archery range Is located south of 
Bristol, Wis., and north of Hwy. 173 on Hwy. 45 Take county road 
JS west off Hwy. 45 and the range Is on the north side of the road. 

'Chili open' 

Golfers of all abilities are Invited to take park in a Chill 
Open Golf Tournament at the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Brae Lock Golf Course, Rte. 45, just south of Rte. 
120 in Grayslake on Sunday, Feb. 23. 

Nine holes of golf will be followed by a hot chill meal 
and prize distribution in the clubhouse. Foursomes Vk^ill 
begin teeing off at 9 a.m. to rcseive a starting time, call 
(708)223-5542. The fee is $15 per person. 

HAPPENINGS AT 



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TTTTVTT! 




20 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



LaJcelife 



Valentines 

(Continued from page 15) 

and secretly married young couples, 

legend says. 

Folklore also speaks of Valentine as an 
early Christian imprisoned by the Romans 
for refusing to worship their gods. 
According to the tale, Valentine had made 
friends with many children who after his 
imprisonment tossed loving notes 
between the bars of his cell window, 
perhaps an explanation for today's 
custom. 

History reports that Valentine was 
executed on Feb. 14 about A.D. 269. In 
A.D, 496, Saint Pope Gclasius I named Feb.- 
14 St. Valentine's Day. 

In Norman French, spoken in 
Normandy during the Middle Ages, the 
word galantine means gallant or lover. 
The resemblance of the saint's name and 
the word is attrrjuted as one reason 
causing people to think of St. Valentine as 
the special saint of lovers. 

Some historians trace the custom of 



sending verses on Valentine's Day to 
Frenchman Charles, Duke of Orleans. 
Captured by the English during the Battle 
of Agincourt in 1415, he was imprisoned 
in England but on St. Valentine's Day sent 
his wife a rhymed love letter from Ills cell 
in the Tower of London. 

Many customs surrounding the holiday 
involved ways single women could learn 
who their future husbands would be. 
Englishwomen of the 1700s wrote men's 
names on scraps of paper, rolled each in a 
little piece of clay and dropped them all 
into water. The first one to surface was 
supposedly the name of the woman's true 
love. 

A more mystical ritual was also 
practiced In the 1700s. Unmarried women 
would pin five pay leaves to their pillows 
on the eve of Valentine's Day — one to the 
center of the pillow and one to each 
corner. If the charm worked, they saw 
their future husbands in their dreams. 

One of the oldest customs had men 



writing names of women on slips of paper 
and drawing them from a jar. Groups of 
friends would meet, draw names, then for 
several days each man wore his 
valentine's name on his sleeve, hence the 
saying, wearing his heart on his sleeve. 
The woman whoso name was drawn 
became his valentine and he paid special 
attention to her. 

Valentine gifts at the time were not 
flowers or candy. In some areas, a young 
man gave his valentine a pair of gloves. 
Wealthy men gave fancy balls to honor 
their valentines. 

In Denmark, men would send pressed 
white flowers, called snowdrops, to their 
valentine for good luck; however in 
Scotland, snowdrops meant just the 
opposite. Danish men also sent a 
gaekkebrev (joking letter). According to 
the custom, the sender writes a rhyme but 
doesn't sign his name. Instead he signs 
the valentine with dots: one for each letter 
of his name. If the receiver guesses his 




name, he rewards her with an Easter egg 
on Easter. The custom is also practiced in 
some areas of Great Britain. 

Comic valentines first entered the 
holiday during the mid- 1800s. Popular 
through the early 1900s, many people sent 
"penny dreadfiils," which read something 
like this: 'Tis all in vain your simpering 
looks, /You never can incline, /With all 
your bustles, stays and curls, /To find a 
valentine.". They sold for a penny and 
have become collector's items. — by 
DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 



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WOMEN FOR THE 21ST CENTIIII7: A NEW SPECIES 





DRAKE'S 

OFFICE SUPPLY 

815 E.Rollins^R.L. Beach 

7ftR.223.0677 



FAMILY COUNSELING 
CLINIC is pleased to announce a 
series of workshops for women that 
will explore the changing roles of 
today's woman. The first workshop 
in the series: 



LOVE, ROMANCE, AND MEN: How Can Cupid Be So Stupid? 

Leader of the workshop will be DR. LEAH PENDARVIS, Ph.D., noted 
therapist, professor and lecturer who specializes in women's issues. She 
will discuss "The Three Faces of Love," things men do tliat drive women 
crazy and how to develop a kinder attitude toward your partner. 

Friday, February 21, 1992 6-7:30 p.m. 

A fee of '5.00 will be charged for each workshop - *20 for the series. 

Registration required 708-223-8107 ^^^^^'"S '^" Limited. 



FUTURE WORKSHOPS 

March 13lh WILL THE REAL SUPERMOM PLEASE STAND UP? 

April A WOMAN'S GUIDE TO SELF ESTEEM 

May WOMEN IN DIVORCE 

June ...YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: How Men And Women Communicate 




Family Counseling Clinic 

19300 West Highway 120, Grayslake, Illinois 60030 



■'•1 ■,« 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Lakokind Kowxpopsrt 21 



-.o) w-tms^i^^ «- ^ 



i'^:=»T>Hi3.Mj»a Jl,V.1T*-_^fr;.^ a — 







SPECIAL OF THE 

MONTH 

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Friday. Feb. 14th 

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SUNDAY 9 A.M. / 
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i 



j Valentines Special 

Ladiesjeceive complimentary glass of wine. 
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Menu Feature Bedr& Wina 

COUlVrilY' FAfRE'PI^M 
iai4 E Beividerp Rd - GrsyslakQ, IL 



or Roast Prime Rib -M 3.9 

RfegularMenu items' Available Tob!^,, 




Quality, ample portions 
a Hidden Cove trademark 



T tyWTd Now Serving 
'JLQWe> Breakfast Daily 






"Quality and large portions," is how 
owner Gus Kotsiovos characterizes his 
Hidden Cove Restaurant & Bar at 926 S. 
Milwaukee Ave. in Libcrtyville. 

"Almost every time dicy have to take 
a doggie bag home/' Gus said. 

As the name suggests, the Hidden 
Cove is a haven for seafood lovers and of- 
fers four or five fresh flsh specials each 
day. 

Whilcfish, rainbow trout, orange 
roughy, lobster, scallops, shrimp, clams, 
oysters, crab — you name it — the Hid- 
den Cove has it the way you like it. 

While the surf offerings are tempting, 
the tuif selections are equally delicious. 
Prime rib is a specialty of the house. 

Other delights include New York strip 
steak, nict mignon, ribs, veal, frog legs 
and chicken. 

The Hidden Cove is offering the best 
of both worlds — lobster and prime rib — 
as a Valentine's Day special. 

A wide range of salads and sandwiches 
make the Hidden Cove a great place for a 
quick — OT leisurely — and economical 
lunch. 



A special of the month is the complete 
all-you-can-eat Sunday breakfast feast for 
just $4.25 ($3 for kids under 10). It runs 
from 9 a.m. until 1:30 p.m and features 
freshly sliced on-ihe-bone ham. 

Free appetizers are served from 3 until 
9 p.m. weekdays. 

Bring the family: A reasonably priced 
kids menu makes it a bargain. 

The fully-stocked lounge features two 
TV's, and they're usually tuned into 
sporting events. 

Gus and (he Hidden Cove will be cele- 
brating a 15lh anniversary this year. In 
tliat time, a reputation for good food and 
value has been established. 

' "We have the best prices in town — 
both food prices and liquor prices," Gus 
said. 

The Hidden Cove is open Monday 
through Sauirday from 1 1 a.m. until 10 
p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. 
The lounge is open until midnight Mon- 
day through Saturday and until 10 p.m. 
Sunday. 

For more information, call (708) 367- 
0021. 




WedncKlar • SpightU] 195 AH You On £il 



Friday-Baked Haddock '9.50 



Sat. -Jumbo Shfltnp '0.95 AM You Can Bar 

Csil for addiSonai dally special infomalior, 

BANQUET FACILITIES 

For Up To 150 People 

•Wtfddln^s •Anntvtrsiirigs 

•Heboarsal Dliincn •Btrihdays 
•Ousmess Moelings •Patiits 

720 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Gurnee 

FOR INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS 
CALL 336-3166 




We're 
having our 
Valentine's 
Dinner in 
Mrs. Sears' 
Bedroom! 




Vfijij 



m 



- CtoHd Uovun - 



JusI for tho fun ol it 
we'fc again opening 
Iho former bedroom 
suilos Into a gayly 
decorated room for 
lovers only, You'll find 
candlclighl on your 
table, a romanllc lire 
In tier lireplace, a 
lover's menu and 
llowers lor both 
of youl 
SSeathgs 
Fri & Sat. 

6p.ni,, 7;30pjn.'&9pTn. 
Reservaf ons required. 



tElie 

(lountru Squire 

Sestaunmt & Coimiif 

(708)223-0121 

Your hoilt. Bill tna Xiit Gor*t 



OFF ANY! 
BURGER L 

^'f with purchase ol Fries & Diinlt. 
t- oner good now Ihiu March \.\m. 



\ 




Bi 



t200 Main St'Antioch 

395-1355 



BIG, BIO, 

JUICY LEAN 
BURGERS 

with onions, bacon, 
mushrooms, cheesa... 
OPEN DAILY 10:30 AM 

RESTAURANT ^^^ 






f>^ 










AIX U CAN EAT V^ 

Includes Soup & Salad 

Sun. & Mon* - Crab Legs • • • • '15*95 

Wed. - BBQ Ribs *1X.95 

Thurs, - FHed Chicken *8.95 

FrL - Hsh Fry '6.95 

<Youf Choice Cod, Smell, or Ocean Perch) 

^ 200 N. Forest - Fox Lake 



S 



(708) 587-3394 









^^ j^j F 'f *>i m^f r- * f, c;-:i 



.,Se7Vwg (Breal^ast; Luncft & "Dinner 
In i^(otise(Bafynj 




^: 



"^^^^^^ 



"ECe^ant banquet Tacidties 
"^Banquets Zip to 300 (Beopk 
Let ZisTtanO^ourS^TCP Tarty '' 







U/LTl/tLAt/ 



22 Lakeland N«w$pap«rs 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Uwii-....*- 



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' . ■ - ■! — -r.»^ /. ~ . *tri!r 



1 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



iness/Reai Estate 




New training device 

Robert Kodera of Twin Lakes, Wis., shows off the Caidance 
Apparatus. The device allows four youngsters to work on soccer 
skills. Wauconda Twp. Soccer Assn. purchased four such 
devices. 



Soccer device promotes safety, skill development 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers' 
When 500 youngsters in the Wauconda 
Twp. soccer Assn. report for the first 



practices this spring, they will be using a 
new device which the inventor believes 
stresses safety and efficiency. 
"We're very pleased with them. It gives 



Business Briefs 



Women's network 
hosts seminar 

Barrington — The Women's 
Home-based Business Network 
(WHEN) will host an educational 
seminar by Carol Pietrus on Effective 
Advertising and Direct Mail on 
Monday. Feb. 17 from 9:15 to 11 
a.m. A sought after speaker, Pietrus 
addresses such topics as advertising 
strategies, direct mail and mail order. 
Her audiences include associations, 
-colleges and Chambers of Commerce. 
She appears in several editions of 
"Who's Who" including the 1991 
"Who's Who in American Women." 
The location is the Barrington 
Methodist Church, 311 S. Hough St. 
WHEN offers women entrepreneurs 
camaraderie, networking and a free 
exchange of ideas. For information 
call Beverly at (708)843-8789. 

Waxier announces 
move, expansion 

Vernon Hills— the Waxier Co. 
has moved its headquarters to a new, 
expanded facility in Vernon Hills. 
Waxler's ncv/ headquarters will be 
located 25 minutes from O'Harc 
Airport and will include a "slate of the 
art" kitchen and auditorium. Started 
over 30 years ago, the Waxier Co. is 
one of the largest and best known 
foodservice brokers in the country. 
The company represents over 8,000 
products from mrjiufacturcrs such as 
Borden Foods, Clorox, Quaker Oats. 
Rich's, Tropicana and Tyson. The 
Waxier Co.'s clients include over 300 
food distributors in Illinois and 
northwest Indiana. 



Bank of Waukegan 
?s reports increase 

Waukegan — Northern States Fi- 
nancial Corp. of Waukegan, holding 
company for the Bank of Waukegan, 
First Federal Bank, fsb and Northern 
. States Trust Co., reported an increase 
in fourth quarter earnings of 28.3 per- 
cent to $1,011,000 or $1.14 per share, 
compared to $738,000, or $.89 per 
share a year earlier. 

For the year ended Dec. 31, 1991, 
the $400 million asset company 
earned $3,675,000, or $4.12 per share, 
compared to $3,863,000, or $4.38, in 
the period last year. 

Northern Slates had Dec. 31 non- 
performing loans of $3.2 million, or 
1.30 percent of loans, down from 1.82 
percent of loans on Sept. 30. 

The operating results reflecls the 
July 1, 1991, acquisition of First 
Federal Bank, fsb., Waukegan. The 
acquisition was accounted for as a^ 
pooling-of-interest and as a result, the 
prior period results have been restated 
to reflect the transaction. 

Free income tax 
return for Block 

Round Lake — Jackson Hewitt 
Tax Service, located at 23 W. Rollins 
Rd., Round Lake Beach is offering a 
free 1991 Individual Tax Return for 
any customer whose last name is 
'"Block." 

According to Joni Glcwicz, general 
manager, "When a client comes in to 
have their income tax prepared we will 
issue a gift certificate for a free indi- 
vidual Income Tax Return if their last 
name is Block." 

For further information call 
(708)740-7500. 



four kids an opportunity to get time on 
the ball and tells them if they arc kicking 
it correctly, Sally Lubeno, said. 

The soccer association purchased four 
Caidance apparatus, a system which a 
Twin, Lakes, Wis. resident has obtained a 
patent Lubeno said the coaches and par- 
ents have been pleased with the early re- 
turns. 

"I had a mom say that her daughter 
learned more in one hour than she did in a 
season of games and practices," Lubeno 
said. 

The device was used in all of the age 
groups last fall in Wauconda, including 
the "Tiny Kickers" (pre-school and kinder- 
garten) right through the under- 14's, 
Kodera said he stressed the safety aspect of 
Caidance, which has been in the planning 
stages since 1978. 

"They're not using good technique. 
They're damaging the ankles and the 
knees," Kodera said of the traditional soc- 
cer leaching methods. 

The center of the Caidance is an ad- 
justable structure, providing an exercise 



device that can be used to develop muscle .. 
strength and reflexes and within a com- 
pact time frame. The device is made of 
Polyelhelene, which adds to its durability. 
The four players can be working on dif- 
ferent kicks at the same time. 

"What I am looking at is safety and get- 
ting quality movements," Kodera said. 
Kodera said he has been spreading the 
word on the new teaching device through 
brochures mailed around the country. 

"If we could accelerate the technique, we 
could put all the effort into working on 
skills," Kodera said. 

As Kodera kicked the ball, he pointed out 
that the popping sound means he is kick- 
ing it correctly. 

The machine may be used generally 
along a horizontal or inclined plane. It can 
be adjusted in height to define different 
angular elevations of a path, determining 
the rebounding speed of a ball. It folds 
compactly. 

Soccer is not its only use, as it could be 
used as a therapy tool for senior citizens, 
Kodera said. 



America's Tax Team — Standing up for you! 



H&BaSIpck 

wan^BJI^ve 
you raoney.^ 









^ ^Mr^yM^^^ 



We know the Inpime tax lavvs and forms inside and out. That's 
our business. 



HftRBLOCK 



llntiach 

SSBUKeSl. 

(f 08) 39 W230 



Round Lake 

629 W. Rollins Rd. 

(708) S4S486a 




9N,.Hipper$tnk 

(708)887-9333 



I We've Moved] 
Wauconda 

474W,UbertySt. 

(708) 82&8377 



ErMriu jFfphrunrv 14. 1992 



Lakeland NowipapAn 23 



l~'j:j; '■-''! f^i^?^' 



"<- 1 ":, i';-f I'r'" '■":'"'■• c \y ',v. 



■:*7>vn ^L,-sf? -y ;..-- •i'\|.c,-; 



Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



P Jfc^ ? .J.:J.i-'.'^v..Jr-^!.M>.?J-.S<Ji-JS!!^l!J. 







5*ito'ft»."'SJ-M >?r-;';j<i 



^Siiliitift 



:> 



fH' 



Never too early to need an estate plan 



by J. MONTGOMERY 
and BOB MIDDLETON 



administrative costs and need to review your plan (or adequate to cover new issues 

unnecessary taxes can cat make a plan) to make sure that confront you when you 

Estate planning is easy into your assets. With an your new spouse is provided 

to put off; often younger estate plan, you can plan to for. If you are newly di- 

clients think it is "too reduce or avoid taxes and vorccd, your plan needs to 

early" to plan their estates, administrative expenses. be updated to remove the 



Without an estate plan, spouse as a beneficiary or guardian for your minor closely-held 
the court appoints a fiduciary. -.un^ -«.„ j^„:„: e ...u^ «-...«. „,: 



This Way to wealth 



or that their estates are too 
small" to need planning. 
Here are some good reasons 
why you should plan your 
estate now: 

• Without an estate plan, 
slate laws determine who guardian for your child. • You have sold your 
inherits your assets: they With an estate plan, you home or purchased a new 
could pass to an esu-'anged select a guardian for your home. The tide to the real 
relative or a very young 
child. With an estate plan, 
you decide who receives a 
share of your assets and 
when. 

Without an estate plan, 



ning Council. They 
are part of the panel 
of financial experts 
preparing This Way to 
Wealth. Your ques- 
tions are invitedXby 
writing to This Way 

to Wealth in care (f 
this paper or to 22031: 

Lakeside Dr.» Ban- 
nockburn, III. 60015. 



child. estate needs to be reviewed 

Aside from the issue of to make sure it is appropri- 

taking control of your life ate to your estate plan, 

to make these decisions, Also, for most estates, the 

events in your life may oc- house is one of the largest 

cur that take control and assets. You need to be sure 

the court appoints adm'inis- make decisions for you. that you have planned so 

irators to manage and dis- You should recognize some that the family can continue 

tribute your assets: of diese "life changes" that in the home if something 

administrators may not call for you to take control should happen to you. 
share your ideas. With an and make a plan: • A new child has been 

Your marital status has added to your family. Espe- 



Editor's note: 

Robert O. Middleton 

arc planning not only for and Janet Montgomery 

yourselves but for your are attorneys concen- 

chlldien. trating in tax planning 

You must select a for individuals and 

busi- 
child. The decision of who nesses with the 
will raise your child, Chicago law firm of 
instilling in him or her the NIsen & Elliott. Both 
values and attitudes that you are members of the 
think are important, will Chicago Estate Plan* 
have the most far-reaching . . . .» 

effect on the child of any Answermg tax qucstions 

Agent Sallie Coding of taining to business taxes 
the Internal Revenue Ser- will also be welcomed, 
vice will speak on tax re- 
form and 1991 income tax 
regulations at Lakeland 
Newspaper's annual Tax 
Seminar set for 7 p.m., 

app^pria\e,'"evcn Vsuch ^^^"^^^X* ^1*** ^?, *" t k a a ^a^A t: 

guidian is not the one you ^?^"l ^003 at the College Leech and Assoc 1914 E. 

would have chosen. You %^ Vf ^ ^°""^^ '" n'i^''^ t''!" ^'f^I'^''''h 

Grayslake. Glona Brda and Marjorie 

The seminar is open to Harris have reached a two 



decision that you make. 

Courts will usually 
honor the wishes of a parent 
choosing a guardian for a 
minor, but if those wishes 
have not been expressed in 
writing, the court is free to 
choose whomever it thinks 



For more information 
call Elizabeth Ebert at 
(708)223-8161. 

Million $ agents 

Agents from Century 21 



must take the affirmative 
step of protecting your 



estate plan, you decide who ....-—«—..-.,..»., j — j. — ^^ «..wj, «... j,. ..,,«»....£, j^... , . .... -if j ^% t i 

wiU manage your estate. recently changed. If you daily for younger couples, child's future through the the public. No registraUon million dollar plus mark. 

• Without an estate plan, have recenUy mairicd, you this "life event" which thoughtful process of nom- required and admission is Agents with over a mto 

*^ , brings such joy also brings inating a ^ardian in your free. There will be ample doUars m production are Lc, 

..J -L-i-.. ^° ".««.iB » 6"'""»»'> "■ 7""* t me nrovided for individual Babingion, Micki Ellcrbrock, 

-rrz I added rcsponsibiliues. Your will or you wishes will "me provmeo lor inaiviauai ^^^^ B;^^^ktT, Km Krosial. 

JTmLifni^ri itOtnSfe. old estate plan may not be never be known. quesUons. Questions per- Pam Podttawa and Jeff Hawidnj 



\ighlaiid 



Inc. 




OMLY 4 WEEKS TILU SPRING! 

START YODR LANDSCAPE 

PLANNING EARLY. 

Rl. 120 and Cedar Lake Rd., 3 mi. west of Grayslake 

(708)546-5160 



i^ Tile Co. 



• Ciistoin Bath "'^^^ 
Shxmroonx 

No Wa^^Siiyl Flooring ^j 



mm 



■'Mpxsh 



'4' 



lie 



mmB 



Corner of Grrc^eu Bay Kd. and 
Hwy. 50, Kenosha, \n 
Phone dumber 

(414) 694-9777 





24 Lakoland Nowspapori 



Friday, February U, 1992 




r;i«! J writ v.. .. L l=JL1 



Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Hir t-... — .-^^VL.'^nau'jL-aujffl 



By 
lel 
ts 

to 

IS- 

If 

an- 

5. 

S 

IXCS 

tion 
at 



/21 
4E. 
jrst. 
orie 
two 
lark. 
ilion 

^Lei 
rock, 

dns. 






North Shore signs honored Pprcntiiipl 

North Shore Sign Co. Gumce, which featured col- try, in the category of vehi- A tl tSvfl-lU^l. 



North Shore Sign Co. 
of Liberty ville was honored 
recently for excellence in 
sign design by the Illinois 
Sign Assoc. 

The company received 
seven awards, based on a 
weighed criteria of overall 
design, compatibility with 
surroundings, selection of 
materials and creativity, as 
part of the association's an- 
nual Sign Design 
Competition. 

North Shore received 
seven awards, placing in 
five of the eight categories 
of outdoor signage judged, 
receiving three first place 
awards, one second and two 
third. 

In the category of non- 
illuminated exterior signs. 
North Shore received first 
place honors for its entry of 
the redwood sandblasted 
display for Scott Byron & 
Co, in Lake Bluff, which 
featured a unique wood ar- 
chitectural support column. 
The company received third 
place honors in the same 
category for the Timberlane 
Estates sign in Libcrtyville. 

In the category of illu- 
minated exterior signs, 
North Shore received second 
place honors for its entry of 
Saluto's Pizza Pasta in 



Gumce, which featured col 
orful graphics and a unique 
cabinet construction. 

Third place honors were 
received in the same cate- 
gory for the Bayridge Court 
Shopping Center signage, 
on Green Bay Rd. in 
Waukegan, which featured a 
pylon sign with a clay tile 
roof, matching the design of 
the building. 

North Shore received 
first place honors in the 
category of integrated sign 
systems, for its entry of the 
sign package for Acorn Self 
Storage in Mundelein, and 
for a van/truck graphics en- 



try, in the category of vehi- 
cle lettering and graphics. 
The awards were presented 
to Duane Laska, vice presi- 
dent of the firm at the asso- 
ciation's winter meeting, 
held in Springfield, 

The Illinois Sign Assoc, 
is an SO member organiza- 
tion of outdoor sign manu- 
facturers, designer fums and 
suppliers, dedicated and 
committed to professional- 
ism in the sign industry. 

North Shore has consis- 
tently placed in the five year 
history of the association's 
design competition, this 
year as the prime winner. 




Ed Cherwa 

Ed Cherwa Associate/Broker 
has joined the suff of Re/Max 
Center located in Three Roads 
Center on Rte. 83, Grayslake. 
Cherwa, along with his wife and 



tons Chris, Jaion, and Michael 
have been residents of Grayslake 
since 1978. Cherwa brings 10 
yeats of full time real estate sales 
and relocation experience to 
Re/Max Center. 

Mark Downey 

Mark J. Downey, of 
Arlington Heights, has been 
promoted to vice president and 
partner of the North Shore frnn of 
James March Goldberg Architects 
Inc. Ek)wncy is now responsible 
for design and management of all 
projects at the Lake Forest-based 
architectural firm. Downey 
attended Glenbrook South High 
School. He was graduated from 
Univ. of Arkansas in 1982 with a 
bachelor of archilcciurc. Downey 



and his wife, Coltccn, have a son, 
Nicholas, 2. 

Tim VanderMeer 

Tim VanderMeer of Antioch 
has completed the insurance and 
investment group's Business In- 
surance School from the Country 
Companies Grayslake Agency. 
The business school is part of an 
advanced training program for 
Country Companies agents. The 
school is designed to make 
agents familiar with various 
business problems including re- 
tirement an disability or death of 
a proprietor. Agents also studied 
tax-sheltered retirement plans, 
business buy outs, salary contin- 
uation and key employee reten- 
tion. 



ARE YOU PAYING TOO MUCH FOR; 
^YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE? ' 



NEW! Here's a medical insurance price 
comparison service that makes it easy to save 
money, find needed coverages - and locate safe 
companies. 

Now you can use the Quick Quotes price comparison service to end 
"insurance confusion" once and lor all. We track the rates, coverages 
and financial stability ratings of 250 leading insurers in a huge, 
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Perhaps (or ihe first time ever, you'll be informaiionally-equipped to 
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Lowe Financial 
Consultants 



(708) 540-9275 




f^'^j; .'^!>'St::.^ji/ ^^^^;;>t'--.y^^.>J.^T■'~:A~^.^::^:ii^j.■lK^^ 



. > •• *^>A---'V »: :-^-'i>i I 



We would 

appreciate your 

calling to come 

to visit with us 

at our new 

location to 

discuss any 

legal problems 

or questions you 

may have. Let's 

get to know 

each other. 



aborsky & Keck 

Experience in Family Law. 



Richard Zaborsky and William Keck have over 50 years 
of legal experience representing families in all phases of 
family law and a family's changing needs. 

So if you are in search of friendly attorneys, please call 
us to become acquainted. 



Personal Injury • Auto Accidents • Slip & Fall Injuries 
• Work Related Injuries • Wills • Product Liability 
• DUI • Wrongful Death • Divorce • Real Estate 
• Tavern Liability 




Call Zaborsky and Keck! 

546-2222 

708 West Rollins Road • Round Lake 



ijLU'M^w w JjL Painting & Home IntproTenieuts» 

Nu-LQQk is one stop shopping - we do it all! 



^Painting 
•Drywall Repairs 
•Wallpapering 
•Wallpaper Removal 




'Carpentry 
•Handyman Work 
•Ceramic Tile 
•Much, Much More 



Fighi 




All Materials At Cost • All Labor 10% Off 

Book Your Exteriors Now & Freeze The Price 

Free Estimates - Staffed Phortes 

Expires Match 1st, 1W2 



(708) 623-7800 



MoMwCard 




Free Lance ^ 
Photography 

SpociaUzing in ' 
Sports 
Photography g 



'Commercial 
'Weddings 



P.O. BOX 48 - ROUND LAKE, IL 60073-0048 ■ 708/546.7840 



RK 

A Solution 
for Contacts 
(and Glasses, Too!) 





^N. yW^^^ system of keratorefractive surgery may allow 
Vjyfif you to reduce or eliminate your dependency on 
glasses or contact lenses through permanent, predictable 
vision correction. Dr. William S. Fagman oFR^onal 
Eye Surgery Associates now makes this precise 
technology available to correct nearsightedness through 
radial keratotomy (RK) surgery. 

Dr. Fagman does the surgery in the office. No 
hospital costs, no hospital hassles. Drops are used to 
numb the eye. No shots, no injections. A one-time 
global fee covers everything — even post-operative 
medications! 

Now docsn t this sound like a solution for you? 

Attend our next Free Seminar! 

Learn more about keratorefractive surgery at our nc3Ct free seminar 
sponsored by Regional Eye Surgery Associates, Dr. Fagman will 
explain the procedures, and tell you if you are a candidate. 

Monday, Feb 17 Call for Reservations! 

Grayslake Eye Care Center ^^^^^ 223-7600 



661 Lake St. 
Grayslake 



Open Saturdays 




REGIONAL 
EYE SURGERY 
ASSOCIATES 



• 4709 W. Golf 
Skokk, IL 60076 
(708) 675-2001 



•718N.DridgpSL 
YorkvillcIL 60560 
(708) 553-^166 



•71 17 W.Archer Aw. -661 Like Sl 
Chkago. IL 60638 Graydakc, IL 60O3O 

(312)586-8444 (708)223-7600 



Friday, February 14. 1992 



Lakoland Newspapsn 25 



Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Scarpellis award educational equipment to area schools 



Raymond Chevrolcl, Antioch, and Ray 
Chevrolet in Fox Lake are offering the 
"Driving for Education" program through 
the end of June using Apple computer 
systems, Magnavox audio-visual equip- 
ment and Compton's encyclopedia sets in 

'Mark and I decided to get 
involved in Driving for 
Education because we are 
local businesses and fiave a 
responsibility to assist the 
community.' 

—Ray Scarpelli 

a unique business and education parmer- 
ship involving schools, parents and vol- 
unteer groups. 

According to Mark Scarpelli, general 
manager of Raymond Chevrolet, the goal 
of the "Driving for Education" program is 
to deliver free computer packages and au- 
dio-visual aids worth more than $1,200 to 
local schools. "Children arc the hope for 
the future and, in the future, computer lit- 
eracy will be as basic to a child's educa- 
tion as reading and writing," Scarpelli 
said. 

The Scarpellis will make it easy for 



the schools and their volunteer groups to 
cam free computers, audio-visual equip- 
ment and encyclopedia sets. 

The Scarpellis have already notified 
school superintendents, principals, teach- 
ers and school volunteer and support 
groups about the program and have pro- 
vided free informational materials. School 
groups, in turn, are to encourage their 
family and friends to simply visit either 
Raymond Chevrolet or Ray Chevrolcl and 
lest drive any new vehicle during the 
school's designated "Test Drive Week". 
When a prc-delermincd number of "Proof 
of Drive" Certificates are tallied, schools 
may select equipment from six different 
award levels. There is no limit lo the 
amount of equipment a school may re- 
ceive. The program involves no cost lo 
the school or the taxpayers and no pur- 
chase is required. 

Ray Scarpelli of Ray Chevrolet said 
"Mark and I decided to get involved in 
'Driving for Education' because we are lo- 
cal businesses and have a responsibility to 
assist the community. With many schools 
having difficulty making ends meet, it's 
important for tlie private sector lo step in 
and offer assistance for the good of the 
area and the future of our kids." 



; 1- aSS^I f'-^ ■ M THE RACE TO THE FfN I5H' 




Scarpellis to help schools 

Mark Scarpelli, left, of Raymond Chevrolet In Aniioch and brother Ray Scarpelli 
of Ray Chevrolet In Fox Lake, discuss their participation in Chevrolet Motor 
division's new "Driving for Education" program. The Scarpellis' voluntary 
participation in this program will help local schools to earn free school 
computers, audio-visual equipment and encyclopedias. 



Strategy seminar set for businesses to survive in 1992 



Ilenc F. Goldstein, a 
Lake County Bankruptcy 
Trustee, expresses the need 
for businesses to become 
more aware of how failing 
businesses and weak eco- 
nomic conditions can harm 
a stable company. 
"Businesses that don'i know 



the warning signs of a 
troubled company will be 
affected greatly this year. 
Companies must develop 
su-ategies to improve their 
chances of collection of ac- 
counts receivable, protect 
their inventory, limit the 
possibility of claims by 



bankrupt businesses, and 
increase the odds of 
identifying when suppliers 
or customers are having 
trouble," stales Goldstein. 
In addition, companies lliat 
are experiencing the down- 
turn may be better able to 
protect their chances of sur- 



viving. 

Members of the law firm 
Rosenthal and Schanfield, 
P.C. and the accounting 
firm of Miller, Cooper & 
Co., Ltd., have developed a 
program that will deal witli 
strategies. The three hour 
seminar will feature Ilenc F. 



Goldstein, immediate past 
Chair of Uie Bankruptcy and 
Insolvency Committee of 
the Chicago Bar Assn. and 
Principal with Rosenthal 
and Schanfield, P.C, Julian 
Levy, Principal with 
Miller, Cooper Co., Ltd., 
and Jodi E. Gimbel, Man- 



ager of Miller, Cooper & 
Co., Ltd. 

The seminar will be held 
Thursday, Feb. 20, begin- 
ning at 8 a.m. at Marrioll's 
Lincolnshire Resort, Ten 
Marriott Dr.» Lincolnshire. 
For additional information 
caU (312)899-5582. 



ii 




award winning round lake news award winning groyslake tfmes award winning fox lake press owara winning 
lake Zurich enterprise award winning vernon crier award winning wauconda leader award winning 
llbertyvllle news award winning mundelein news award winning lake villa record award winning antioch 
news-reporter award winning llndenhurst news award winning north Chicago tribune award winning round 
lake news award winning groyslake times award winning fox lake press award winning take Zurich enterprise 
award winning vernon crier award winning wauconda leader award winning llbertyvllle news award 
winning mundelein news award winning lake villa record award winning antioch news-reporter award 
winning llndenhurst news award winning north Chicago tribune award winning round lake news award 
winning groyslake times award winning fox lake press award winning lake zurlch enterprise award winning 
vernon crier award winning wauconda leader award winning llbertyvllle news award winning mundelein 
news award winning lake villa record award winning antioch news-reporter award winning llndenhurst news 
award winning north Chicago tribune award winning round lake news award winning groyslake times award 
winning fox lake press award winning lake zurlch enterprise award winning vernon crier award winning 
wauconda leader award winning iibertyviile news award winning mundelein news award winning lake villa 
record award winning antioch news-reporter award winning llndenhurst news award winning north Chicago 
tribune award winning round lake news award winning groyslake times award winning fox lake press award 
winning lake zurlch enterprise award winning vernon crier award winning wauconda leader award winning 
llbertyvllle news award winning mundelein news award winning lake villa record award winning antioch 
news-reporter award winning llndenhurst news award winning north Chicago tribune award winning round 
lake news award winning groyslake tfmes award winning fox lake press award winning lake Zurich enterprise 
award winning vernon crier award winning wauconda leader award winning llbertyvllle news award 
winning mundelein news award winning lake villa record award winning antioch news-reporter award 
winning llndenhurst news award winning north Chicago tribune award winning round lake news award 

^winning groyslake times award winning fox lake press award winning lake 
Zurich enterprise award winning vernon crier award winning 
wauconda leader award winning llbertyvllle news award 
winning nnundelein news award winning lake villa record 
award winning antioch news-reporter award winning 
llndenhurst rtews award winning north Chicago tribune 
award winning round lake news award winning 
groyslake times award winning fox lake press 
\ award winning lake zurlch enterprise award 
winning vernon crier . award winning wauconda 
leader award winning llbertyvllle news award 
winning mundelein news award winning lake 
villa record award winning antioch news- 
reporter award winning llndenhurst news award 
winning north Chicago tribune award winning 
round lake news award winning groyslake times 
award winning fox take press award winning lake 
Zurich enterprise award winning vernon crier 
award winning waucorda leader award v^^nntng 
llbertyvllle news award winning mundelein news 
award winning take villa record award winning 
antioch news-reporter award winning llndenhurst news 
award winning north Chicago tribune award winning 
round lake news award winning groyslake times award 
winning fox lake press award winning lake zurlch enterprise 




26 Lakoland Nowspapon 



Frtcfay, February 14, 1992 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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Wolves in Lake County? Well, maybe one or two 



by DEBRA A, SCHWARTZ 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Shy» determined, hearty, fast, 
independent and able to engage in 
chemical warfare, wolves have become a 
trendy subject among animal rights 
activists and opponents of deer culling in 
Lake County foiest ineseives. 

A wolf pack requires an average home 
range of about 2S0 square miles, according 
to Lake County Forest Preserve Wildlife 
Biologist Frank Drummond. The entire 
county is 457 square miles, he said. 

"They range over a large area and require 
undisturbed, practically wilderness areas. 
So much of Lake County is either in 
metropolitan areas or subdivided. There's 
just not enough land to support a pack of 
wolves," he said. 

However in Minnesota, the grey wolf, 
native to the upper midwestcm and eastern 
states, reportedly covers territories of only 
36 to 150 square miles with one- or two- 
mile-wide overlapping strips of land 
which function as a buffer zone between 
home turfs. The strips are entered by 
wolves mainly to renew their claims. 
Studies show deer living in the buffers are 
not threatened though they may be weak 
and easy jney. 

A wolf can go for weeks without eating 
and can sprint 35 mph. They are big: 
males grow to 115 pounds and females to 
95 pounds. Typically, packs number from 
five to 10. They have a hierarchy 
determined by strength. The strongest pair 
breed and prevent lesser wolves from 
procreating. To do so, the top female 
emits a pheromone that stops ovation in 
others. A new pack forms when a wolf 



leaves its family to establish its own 
tciritory. Research shows one Minnesota 
wolf walked 550 miles before settling 
down. 

There are no reports of wolves killing 
humans. People have, however, been 
injured by wolves when the animals were 
provdced, research shows. 

Fear, hate and loathing for the wolf was 
brought to this country by European 
settlers who did their best to force the 
wolf into conflict with humans by 
destroying habitat and decimating the 
animal's source of food. When settlers 
began raising livestock, wolves had little 
choice but to prey on them. 

'What are people really afraid of?" asked 
Fremont Township resident Shiela 
Cameron, who has championed the return 
of the wolf to Illinois. Teople before my 
generation decided to wipe out the wolf. I 
think it's the responsibility of this 
generation to bring them back." 

The native of Northville, Mich, and 
new mother grew up in an area where 
wolves were brought as part of an airlift 
program. "If they can do it with our 
neighbors, there's no reason why they 
can't do it in Illinois," she said. 

The urbanization of the county is a 
factor detering some county board 
members from supporting a move to 
bring grey wolves into the area. However, 
seemingly, there is at least one already 
here. 

Fremont Township resident Ray 
Jorgenson claims two sightings of a wolf 
in the area in as many years. "I was taking 
the dogs out for a walk and he was up in 
our front yard where there are trees. He 



was just standing there. I had my dogs on 
leashes. As I walked back, he walked 
away. He wasn't hurrying. His tracks were 
22-inches between paw prints," he said. 

The size of the paw prints indicated the 
animal was about 100 pounds, he said. 
"He's not a coyote because a coyote's not 
that big," he said. The second sighting 
was along Gilmer Road. Jorgenson said 
other area residents have also seen the 
wolf cutting through the field. " 

Jorgenson raises a small flock of sheep 
on his U acre homestead not far from 
Hawley and Erhart roads. There's a lot of 
space out there," he said. "Tbere's enough 
open space and deer around here to support 
wolves. I could sec reintroducing a wolf 
around here. They don't cause any 
problems. They aren't going to go out 
eating dogs and cats. We have sheep and 
diey aren't bothered," be said. 

The myth of a wolf in sheep's clothing 
has been associated more with sexual 
undertones than fear of physical harm 
from the animal. By legend, Romulus and 
Remus, the founders of Rome, were 
nurtured as babes by a female wolf. 
Eskimos as well as Native Americans 
admired and learned from the predator. 
With none of the negative connotations 
associated with werewolves, American 
folklore tells of men who shifted from 
human to wolf form. 

As wildlife advocates across the nation 
investigate the possibility of reintroducing 
wolves to areas from which the animals 
were previously exterminated or driven 
from, a new myth arises: that wolves 
harvest only sick, old and weak animals, 
thereby keeping ecosystems balanced and 
prey animals healthy. 



In fact, as reported by National Wildlife 
magazine, wolves have large appetites 
and will "not flinch from tearing off 
hunks of flesh from living deer. They will 
kill any moose, elk or deer that they can 
catch, not just the old and sick. Once in a 
while, they kill more than they can eat; 
occasionally they kill each other. And 
they do not always keep prey populations 
in perfect balance. They are, however, far 
from being savage, bloodthirsty 
marauders. No real wolves ever leapt into 
troikas to snatch babies from the arms of 
terrified Russian mothers." 

Wildlife champiai Davida Terry, a Lake 
County Board candidate from the 18th 
district, does not favor inutxlucing wolves 
into the area "because of man's 
interference in the natural balance of 
things. There are no wolves here, but I 
would not rule out the possibility that 
there can be." she said. 

County Board member Deloris Axelrod, 
who has been outspoken against culling 
of deer in the forest preserves, said she is 
"more afraid of the two-legged kind of 
animal with a gun rather than the four- 
legged kind that runs away from people. If 
there are wolves out there, they should be 
left alone to resUwe the balance of nauire." 

Fearing hysterics from people if they 
knew wolves were in the forest preserves, 
she was reluctant to advocate bringing a 
wolf pack in the area. "I'm afraid the 
introduction of an animal like a wolf, 
with Its ferocious reputation, would aeaie 
more problems than h would correct" 

However, she said, "Uncontrolled 
hunters hunting wolves are more of a 
danger to man and beast than a few wild 
animals arc." 



Easing Your Tax 



ard«n 



IRS puts also puts money back into pockets 



by DICK WINTRODE 

Everyone knows that 
the IRS collects taxes. But 
did you know we also put 
money into the pockets of 
parents who need It? In fact, 
last year we gave nearly 
$300 million of "free 
money" to Illinois 
residents. I would like to 
take this opportunity to 
briefly explain how we do 
this. 

If you are a woridng 
parent with at least one 
child, and have income 
under $21,250, you may be 
eligible for Earned Income 
Credit (EIC). This 
refundable credit is 
sublracted from the amount 
lax you may owe. And 
guess what? Even if you 
didn't owe any tax, you may 
still get money back. 

This year the maximum 
credit you can claim is 
$2,020, up from $953 in 
1990. Also, more of you 
will be eligible. However, 
there is some bad news. 



Applying for the 1991 
credit has become more 
difficult than for 1990. EIC 
is now divided into three 
credits, the basic credit, the 
health insurance credit, and 
an extra credit for a child 
bom in 1991. You can 
claim each credit that 
applies to you, but you 
must now file a Schedule 
EIC, which is new for 
1991. 

I know that many of 
you will probably have 
some trouble completing 
Schedule EIC since its a 
new form. We know what 
you'll be facing, and we 
will be here to help. 

First, you can get help 
in person at one of our local 
offices. We have 10 offices 
in northern Illinois and pur 
employees will go over the 
form with you and answer 
any questions. If going to 
an IRS office is sites. Here, 
an IRS trained volunteer 
will help you onc-on-one at 
over 100 different locations. 



Or, if you prefer, you 
can call us and we can help 
you over the phone. To 
obtain help by phone, or 
Icam the location and hours 
of the nearest IRS office or 
VITA site, call us at 
(312)435-1040. 

Let me tell you about 
the easiest way we can help- 
let us figure the EIC for 
you. Simply fill out cither 
Form 1040 or Form 1040A 
and Schedule EIC Part II, 
"Information About Your 
Two Youngest Qualifying 
children," and Part III 
"Other Information," and 
send it in. We'll do the rest 

Let me give you an 
example of how much the 
EIC can be worth to you: 

Bill and Sue, a married 
couple, have three children, 
Bobby, age 1 1, Barry, age 
9, and Benny, 8 months of 
age. Their adjusted gross 
income was $16,378 during 
1991, Based on the above, 
they arc eligible to receive 



the following amount in 
EIC: 

Because of the two older 
children, they would receive 
$602 for the basic credit; 



some welfare benefits 
available to them. Let me 
assure you that receiving 
EIC will have no effect on 
Aid to Families With Dcpl. 



due to the birth of baby Children (AFDC); 



Benny in 1991, they will 
receive $174: 

they provided health 
insurance coverage for all 
die children; 

they will be eligible to 
receive $209. 

Therefore, Bill and Sue 
will receive a total EIC fo 
$985 for 1991. 

In the past, some 
eligible families didn't file 
for this credit because they 
thought they would lose 



Medicaid; Supplemental 
Social Security Income 
(SSI); Food Stamps; and 
low income housing. 

I have some more good 
news about EIC. You can 
get up to $1,192, the basic 
credit for one chdd, in 
advance for 1992. Here's 
how it works. File a Form 
W-5, "Earned Income Credit 
Advance Payment 
Certificate," with your 



employer. Your employer 
will pro-rate your ^vanced 
credit throughout the year. 
As a result, you will get 
extra money in each 
paycheck. 

If you receive the 
advance EIC, you will have 
to file Form 1040 or Form 
1040 A next year to report 
the money received and to 
take advantage of any 
addidonal parts of the EIC 
for which you qualify. 

For more information 
on EIC, calll (800)829- 
3676 and ask for 
Publication 596, "Earned 
Income CrcdiL" 




Need 
a hand? 



An IRS-tralned volunteer can help you with 
your taxes. fRJEE . Just call I-800-TAX-1040. 




* PtOC V<W»tf IW PtfCIKfl t 



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FINANCIAL 

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10910 Main Street 

Richmond, IL 6007 1 

(815) 678-2461 

(708) 587-4710 

• Tax Preparalion 

• Electronic Filing 

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• Tax Planning 

Friday. Fobwafy 14, 1992 



Robert H. 
Ogilvie 

CerL Public Accountant 

(708) 2494336 

Gurnee 

Antioch 

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Tax Service 

Individual & Business Returns 

• Personalized 

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Before IRS 

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392 Lake St.. Antioch 



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CQrtiflQd Public 
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• Individual 

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(708) 587-4552 

Free Financial Analysis 
Call for Details 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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Quick response time foils Fox Lake robber 



by GREG MILLER 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Nine minutes. 

Thai's how long it took police to 
chase down and nab a man who robbed the 
Second Federal Savings and Loan 
Association in Fox I-ake Tuesday after- 
noon. 

"The thing went down textbook," said 
Fox Lake police Lu Jim Busch. "They did 
exactly what they're trained lo do." 

Arrested was James Gomick, 60, of 
Ottawa, who was charged with two Class 
X felonies, armed robbery and armed vio> 
Icnce. 

Busch said Gomick entered the bank at 
the intersection of Rte. 12 and Grand Av- 
enue just after noon. 

Lisa DiNatale, a teller in the bank, 
said the robber approached the window 
being manned by branch manager Allen 
Sturges. He asked for two rolls of quarters 



and then demanded money in large 
denominations. 

"That's when I heard a ruckus going 
on," DiNatale said. "And that's when I hit 
the alarm." 

DiNatale said Sturges handed over 
$560, which the robber put into a blue 
duffel bag. 

Although she never saw the .38 re- 
volver police say Gomick used in the 
robbery, DiNatale said she was scared, 

"I was scared to death," she said. 
"When I saw Allen's face, I knew some- 
thing was up. It happened so fast. I guess 
we did what we're supposed to do — we 
stayed cahn." 

When Gomick left the bank, Sturges 
jumped over the counter and followed him 
out the door, hoping to get a description 
of the car or a license number. 

As the thief came out the door, he 
bumped into Bill Gross of the neighbor- 



ing Ace Hardware. Both Sturges and Gross 
were ready with a description for police. 

While fleeing to his car on foot, Gor- 
nick reportedly dropped his gun and had to 
stop and pick it up. 

An off-duty Lake County Sheriffs 
Department deputy saw the commotion 
from the adjacent White Hen Pantiy, and 
he alerted other police via his car radio at 
12:07 p.m. 

"If the deputy would not have been 
there in his unmarked car with a radio, we 
might not have caught him," Busch said. 

A Fox Lake police unit immediately 
gave chase but lost Gomick's car briefly. 
With several units in the hunt, Gomick 
was finally stopped and taken into custody 
at 12:16 near the intersection of Rte. 12 
and Arlington Road. 

"He was passive — he offered no 
resistance," Busch said. 

Gomick has an "extensive" police 



record, Busch said, including serving at 
least part of sentences of 30, 18, 15, three 
and two years for armed robbery. He's 
been out of prison for two years since 
serving his last sentence. 

Busch said since Gomick is a career 
criminal, the sentences could be enhanced 
to 30-60 years instead of 15-30. 

Fox Lake police Lt Edward Edward 
Garretsen, who's leading the investigation. 
was in Waukegan for a bond hearing at 
press time. Busch said there may be no 
bond set in this case. 

The quick apprehension was the result 
of teamwork between the Fox Lake, 
county and state police departments, 
Busch said 

"Everything worked beautifully," 
Busch said of the collar. "The cooperation 
between departments was fantastic. I can't 
pat them on the back enough. I'm so 
proud of them I could holler." 



Court Services needs volunteer probation officers 



The Division of Court 
Services Volunteer in Pro- 
bation Program Lake 
County, Illinois has posi- 
tions available for people 
who arc seeking experience 
in volunteering for the court 



system. 

The VIP Program 
originated in 1971 lo assist 
the Adult Probation Dcpt. 
with the supervision of 
persons probation. Citizens' 
involvement in the program 



has made a great impact on 
the whole criminal justice 
system. The volunteer pro- 
gram strives to reduce the 
community crime rate and 
prevent recidivism by as- 
signing volunteer probation 



officers lo work one-on-one 
with probationers. 

Young adults who are 
placed on probation are of- 
ten individuals without 
good role models or 
support A volunteer assists 



probationers by supporting, 
encouraging, and assisting 
them in the problem areas 
which have contributed to 
their criminal behavior. 

Training sessions are 
scheduled for March, for any 



prospective volunteers. 
Conlact Robyn McGarriglc 

for further information at 
(708)360-6454 between 8 

a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 






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28 Lokoland Newspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 





An Area Guide to Home Design, Remodeling and Real Estate 



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Large carpet above was hand-knotted In the city of 
Shirvan In the Caucasus. It was created In about 1900 and 
measures 61 3/4' by 48 1/8'. Top left carpet was hand- 
knotted In the Caucasus In the late 19th or early-'20th 
century. It was created In either the city of Daghestan or 
Shirvan and measures 65 1/4' by 44 7/8'. Carpet at right 
was hand-knotted In the cit/ of Shirvan created In about 
1900 and measures 61 3/4" by 48 1/8'. All carpets are being 
adapted as part of the /\rt Institute of Chicago Collection 
of Near Eastern Carpets. Photos courtesy of Nancy Rnn of 
the Art Institute of Chicago. 




The Art Institute of Chicago 
has an exdusive licensing 
agreement that has been 
granted to the Minasian Rug 
Corp., one of the largest 
oriental rug concerns In the United 
States, based in Evanston. The 
agreement enables the Minasian Rug 
Corp. to create adaptations of Near 
Eastern Carpets and European tapestries 
from the Art Institute of Chicago's 
collection. CIiristaThurman, curator of 
the Art Institute's Dept of Textiles and 
Armcn Minasian, CEO of the Minasian 
Rug Corp. (MRQ, are directing this 
collaboration. For the first time in the 
department's 30 year history, high 
quality hand-woven adaptations of their 
historic v/ovcn and knotted treasures 
will be available to grace a limited 
number of homes and ofTiccs around the 
world. 

The project consists initially of 12 
carpets and throe tapestries, hand- 
icnotted and woven in the Middle East 
and Europe. Some of the carpets are well 
ovcr300 years old and in remarkably 
good condition. 

A team of rug experts induding 
Camig Minasian, rug historian and 
president of the retail division of MRC, 
Gregory Jorjorian, president and COO of 
MRC, Armcn Minasian, Chrlsta 
Thurman and her staff, examined the 
entire collection and selected carpets 



IRS^SJfBPf^fSBgPi^IB!^ 




and tapestries to begin this project 

Four of the selected carpets that vdil 
comprise the first set of the Art lastitute 
Collection, were made between the 17th 
and 19th centuries in the Caucusus, 
region in south eastern European USSR 
located between the Black Sea and the 
Caspian Sea. TWo other carpets were 
produced in India m the early 1900's. 

The Minasian Rug Corp. has interests 
In rug weaving cooperatives in the 
Peoples Republic of Cliina and in Ro- 
mania. They have selected the Harmon 
Weaving Cooperative in Harmon, Ro- 
mania to reproduce the initial series. 

TWo designers and two weavers from 
Harmon are in the U.S. to assist in the 
design process and to begin knotting 
samples. Melinia Vlad and Camclia 
Mertic, two of Harmon's best designers, 
are painstakingly graphing patterns for 
each carpet, knot by knot Matching 
pattern and color exactly to each strand 
of yam on the original carpet, eadi knot 
is counted and hand painted with a 
primitive wooden brush- 
Once the graphs are completed and 
examined for authenticity, they will be 
brought to the Harmon Weaving Coop- 
erative to begin weaving. Each carpet 
will take approximately sbc months to 
complete once it ha s been strung onto 
the loom. It takes approximately one 
million hand-tied loiots to bring out the 
color and patterns deariy. 



\ 



In This Issue 

Build handy storage unit- 
for old newspapers 



'i 





A Easy decorating tips 



4 



How to use nails 



\ 



Unusual two- 
story home 



4 



Radiant floor 
heating 



3rcl 

almart) 

<250 

ACURA 

Mir- xfc^n, 141 ■.■■■% I 



February 1992 




iMMIi 





f 14, 1992 



— ». 4^ 



-k;-r»'— '- :~srm 



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fii 



I 



'II i* 




Baljiilliwi 






I 



Round up old newspapers in handy storage unit 

Now you can deep your western softwood lumber for the sides, each 14-1/2 I ' ~~ ' ~ ^x?f — — ; ^_- "^^^-^ ^^p, ^^ii^l 

_ij .1 .if. ^^j :__- :-,! . 1 /r_L HnnHvrontnner stores ^^^ i^^ f^ f-c\ rfU>^ -J 



Now you can deep your 
old newspapers neatly 
corralled until you're 
ready to bundle them up 
for recycling. With its 
simple styling and natural 
wood finish, this 
handsome storage unit 
will look right at home in 
your living room, family 
room or den. 

And by laying twine 
across the bottom of the 
empty container, it's also 
easy to tic and remove the 
papers when tlie bin is 
full. The unit will hold up 
to a month's supply of 
newspapers. 

The container is made 
from standard size 



western softwood lumber 
and requires no special 
woodworking skills or 
tools to build. 

For the top and bottom 
frame you will need four 
lengths of 1x2, each 15 in. 
long, and four more 
lengths 16-1/2 In. long. 
Assemble the frames to 
form two rectangles 15 in. 
wide by 18 in. long. Glue 
the joints and secure with 
1-1/2 in. screws. 

(Tip: When you're 
working with small- 
dimension lumber, it's a 
good idea to predriU both 
nail and screw holes to 
avoid splitting the wood.) 

Cut 14 lengths of Ixl's 



WekHoIdingOarSemi-Annual 
SaleAtYwr Place. 

From now until March 28, our ColorVan* will bring 
substantial savings on draperies, hard window products, top 
treatments^ furniture, carpeting and wallcoverings— right 
to your home. 

Just call us. And 
browse without once jfiiiil^' 
leaving your living room. HlllMsi^isi' 

Mary Leben 

662-661 2_ Great kkasJustComeToYnt" 

lQo\(, For The Dimnsions In Decorstg Colum in The A! Horn Seclion. 

LKhlnnchtvlndqxruicndyowrwdindopenicd C19420DSI 




TM 



for the sides, each 14-1/2 
in. long, (I'or a more 
finished appearance, you 
might want to cut the tops 
of the posts at an angle.) 
Mark the location of four 
1X1 posts at each end, 
allowing approximately 3 
in. between posts. To be 
certain the posts will be 
vertical, transfer tlie 
marks to the upper frame. 
Glue and nail the Ixl's to 
the inside of the frame so 
the bases of the posts are 
even with the bottom of 
the lower frame. Position 
the tops of the posts 1/2- 
in. below the top of the 
frame. 

To complete the base, 
cut four lengths of 1x1, 
each 15 in. long. Space 
the Ixl's evenly across the 
base, as shown, then glue 
and nail to tlie bottom 
frame. Finish the wood 
with one or more coats of 
polyurethane varnish. 

Optional: To keep the 
twine in place'as you load 
the newspapers, make 
small saw cuts in the outer 
edge of the upper frame. 
Make the cuts 
approximately 1/4-in. 
deep in tlie center of all 
four sides. Then, before 
you start putting in the 
papers, lay two lengths of 
twine across the bottom 
and secure the ends in the 
slots. 




Handy container stores 

nev/spopers In style until ready 

for recycling. 

Made from 

standard-size 

softwood 

lumber. 

requires 

minimum 

woodworking 

skills to 

complete. 



Unveil trend house for 1 992 



MarshaU Field's will 
unveil its "Rediscovering 
America" 1992 Trend 
House, in celebration of 
the 500th anniversary of 
Columbus' discovery of 
America, on Friday, 
March 6. Designed by 
Field's Interior Design 
Studio, the Trend House 
reminisces to an era of 
gracious elegance and 
warmth. 

Designed by Donald 
Mowat, the 1992 
Williamsburg Trend 



House is framed in flame 
maliogany and fabricated 
in a lovely blend of chintz 
and small-print cottons. 

Featured in tlie Trend 
House, Marshall Field's 
and Baker Furniture will 
Introduce Baker's first 
collection of Williams- 
burg reproductions. 

Natucket Cottage, de- 
signed by Kent Kiesey, will 
be decorated with a 
white- washed chccfulness 
using soft pastel florals 
and prints. 



Located on tlie eightli 
floor of the State Street 
store, this unique collec- 
tion will be open to the 
public during store hours 
through December, 1992. 
From noon to 1 p.m., 
Elizabeth Guslcr, curator 
for Williamsburg Collec- 
tions will lecture on 18th 
Century Virginia Planta- 
tion Houses. The ticket 
price for the lecture is $5 
and reservations are be- 
ing taken at (3 12)781- 
5000. 




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(N.W. Corner Rts. 45 & 120) 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



% 



\ \: 



30 Lakeland Nowspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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2. 

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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Q: I have a lot of 
decorating to do, but no 
time and every time I 
begin, it's so 

overwhelming. How do I 
contact a decorator and 
what Is the procedure In 
working with one? 

A: With todays 
overwhelming choices in 
home furnishings, a 
professional decorator is 
no longer a luxury but a 
necessity. Here are a few 
tips to help you enjoy 
working with the 
decorator of your choice. 

•Do your homework! 
What are your color 
preferences? Styles? Basic 
priorities? 



•Look through 
magazines, what catches • 
your eye? 
' "Give some thought to 
your budget, tliis 
guideline will save you 
lots of valuable time. 

•Think about your 
functional needs and your 
decorating desires for 
your room or rooms. 

•Ask for references and 
experience of the 
Decorator. 

Working with a 
professional, caring 
decorator is truly a 
pleasurable experience. 
Just remember, effective 
communication is the key 
to accomplishing each 



and every one of your 
decorating dreams. 

Q: I've just purchased 
new custom drapcrtesi 
how often do 1 need to , 
clean them? 

A: As little as possible. 
Vacuuming is a must. You 
should do this as often as 
you vacuum your 
upholstered furniture. 
Dry-clean as little as 
possible. When draperies 
are dry-cleaned the fabric 
loses some of its luster, 
and stiffening for pleats is 
weakened. They never 
quite hang the same way. 
Never put your draperies 
in the washing machine. 



Its too rough on the 
drapery. 

Q: I have a powder 
room that stumps me, 
any suggestions? 

A; The powder room is 
usually the smallest and 
most ignored room in the 
house. Because you spend 
little time there be bold, 
daring and dramatic. 

If you've been afraid to 
use dark rich colors or a 
bold print, this may be the 
place for it. A light usually 
must be turned on 
because of a lack of 
windows, so don't be 
afraid of dark color. 
Creme tones don't make a 
5x5 room any bigger! 
Accessories arc important 
to finish the look. Add 
pictures, candles, nic-nacs 
to the corner of the sink. 
Put up a shelf, hang a 
plant (silk of course). Have 
fun with this little room! 

Q: Can I use different 
colored carpeting 
throughout my house or 
does It have to be the 
same? 

A: As a general rule, 
carpet in rooms which 
meet at the doorway, 
should be the same color. 
By using the same color 
for joining carpets, you 
will provide a smooth 
uninterrupted look that's 
pleasing to the eye. 
Abrupt changes in color 
tend to interrupt the 
natural flow from room to 



room. However, if the 
color variations are subde, 
such as pale pastels or 
light beige tones, the 
different carpets may 
serve to compliment each 
other. 

Q:I want to give my 
living room a fresh new 
look but I don't want to 
redecorate the whole 
room, any suggestions? 

A: Assuming your 
furniture Is in good shape 
and the color is not out of 
date, I would start widi the 
window treatment. Color 
usually sets the mood for 
a room. Upon examining 
the room, pull a color that 
isn't so dominant to give 
this change. Put this color 
along with a pattern Into 
the window treatment. 



Dollar for dollar, the 
windows will create the 
most impact in a room. 
Also use the same pattern 
or companion print on a 
table skirt or pUlows for 
the sofa. 



MaryLeben invites all 
readers to send in their 
questions, decorating 
problems, decorating tips, 
ideas or suggestions. Each 
question will be 
personally answered on a 
first'Come first-answered 
basis. 

Send your questions to 
Mary Leben CIO of 
Lakeland Newspapers, P, 
O. Box, 30 S, Whitney St„ 
Grayslake, JL 60030. 



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Rt.l76 

Libertyville 

(708) 362-2683 




BUICK • JEEP • EAGLE 



Friday, rebniaty 14, 1992 



luksland Nmvspapan 31 



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Basic pointers on nails and how to use them 



Do-it-yourself maga- 
zines abound on today's 
newsstand, urging novice 
carpenters to taclde any 
number of liome im- 
provements. "Build Tlie 
Decic of Your Dreams in 
Just Two Weelcs." "Savor 
the Pleasure of a Victorian 
Porch-Plans Inside." 
Cover titles lure us to try 
our hand at projects with 
wood — to enhance our 
homes, advance our slcills, 
and give us the satisfac- 
tion of a job well done. 

After all, what could be 
more basic than using 
hammer and nails to 
whaclc a few boards to- 
gether? Everyone can do 
it— right? That's just tlie 
problem. Not everyone 
can do it— right. 

Fastening witli hammer 
and nails is a sicill that's 
taken too much for 
granted, resulting In a 
great many wood struc- 
tures that are not as strong 
or durable as they should 
be, and too many builders 
who become frustrated 
with their efforts. 
It's a fact that an article 
, made of wood is no 
stronger than the joints 
that hold it together. So 
learning the basics of 
wood joinery before tack- 
ling a major project is 
time well spent for the 
beginning woodcrafter. 
There are hundreds of ex- 
cellent books out there, in 
libraries and bookstores, 
but here are a few basic 
pointers to get you started. 
Tooling Up 

Hammen Buy the best 
hammer you can afford, 
since your safety and the 
quality of your work de- 
pend on it. A curved-head 



claw hammer, with drop- 
forged steel head that is 
permanently bonded to a 
steel or fiberglass handle 
is the strongest type avail- 
able. For rough construc- 
tion, al6-, 20-, or22-oz. 
hammer is best. For finish 
work, choose a 12-, or 16- 
oz. hammer. 

Nails.: High-quality, 
American-made steel 
nails offer uniform, true- 
centered heads, straight 
shanks, and sharp points. 
Select nails of tlie correct 
type, length, gauge and 
finish for your project. All- 
purpose Common and 
Box nails come in the 
broadest array of sizes, but 
specialty nails for specific 
tasks can make a job 
much easier. Be sure to 
specify galvanized nails 
for outdoor work. 

Nail Set.: A small hand 
tool that resembles a 
punch, and is used to 
countersink the head of a 
fmishing nail below the 
wood's surface. The hole 
is then filled with wood 
compound, smoothed 
and finished with stain or 
paint. Nail sets come in 
graduated sizes. 

Awl: A small hand tool, 
much like an ice-pick, 
used to create starter 
holes for nails. 

Brad Awl: A clever, 
hand-held tool with a 
magnetic tip that can pick 
up and hold a single wire 
brad, and drive it into 
wood with a single stroke. 

Safety Glasses: Always 
wear protective eye gear 
when driving or extracting 
nails. If extracting a large 
quantity of nails, protec- 
tive work gloves are also . 
advised. 



Basic Nailing Tips 

Keep your head still and 
your eye on the nail, if you 
want to keep your thumb 
intact. Don't watch the 
hammer— watch the nail. 
Hold the hammer at the 
end of the handle, not up 
the shanks, and drive with 
a steady rhythm, like a 
pendulum. All action 
should be in the forearm, 
not the wrist, with the el- 
bow acting as the fulcrum. 
At the moment of impact, 
the handle of the hammer 
should be at right angle to 
the nail head, so that nails 
are driven straight and 
true. 

Ifsplitting the wood 
along the grain becomes a 
problem, blunt the tip of 
the nail slighdy with a tap 
of the hammer. This al- 
lows the nail to tear the 
wood fibers instead of 
spreading (splitting) 
them. 

If a nail starts to bend 
when driven, don't try to 
straighten it. Retract it at 
once, and start again, In a 
slightly different place. 

For fine finishing work, 
stop hammering when 
the nail Is just above the 
surface of the wood. Fin- 
ish inserting the nail with 
a nail set. 

Extract naUs with a pair 
of pincers, or with the 
claw end of a claw ham- 
mer. Before applying 
leverage, place a small 
piece of wood under the 
hammer head to prevent 
surface damage to the 
work. 

Effective Nailing Tech- 
niques 

Face Nailing. Nailing 
directiy through the face 
or width of a board's sur- 



face. Select a nail that is 2 
1 /2 to 3 times longer than 
the thickness of the top 
board. If several nails 
need to be placed, stagger 
them slightly to avoid 
splitting wood along the 
grain. If nailing through a 
board face into the end- 
grain of another board, 
use a longer nail, or a 
grooved nail for secure 
hold. 

Toenailing: Driving, 
nails in on the slant, and 
at opposite angles to each 



other. Nails driven at an 
angle offer greater hold 
than those driven straight, 
and by alternating the di- 
rection of the slant, an 
even stronger hold Is 
achieved. 

Blind Nailing: Driving a 
nail so that the head is 
concealed on the finished 
surface. Generally used to 
attach tongue-in-groove 
lumber (paneling or 
flooring) to underlying 
structure by nailing down 
at an angle through the 



tongue. This technique 
conceals the nail head, 
and also prevents gaps 
between individual 
pieces of wood. 

Gluing of Joints: 

Application of glue before 
assembly with nails adds 
strength to a joint. Use 
white wood glue beaded 
or brushed on. Once parts 
are pressed together, nail 
the joints, and clean any 
excess glue with a damp 
cloth. 




Phillip E. Miller 



I make house calls. 

Coll for free, no obligofion oppoinfment fodoy. 

Ask for Phi 

Stocks ■ Bonds ■ IRAs ■ Mutual Funds ■ Annuities 

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^ JNVES17t£ENIS SINCE J8S7 

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(815)338-2550 anhm^ews 



"WHO SAYS I CANT BE FOUND" 



FRANKAJOCIUS 



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Frank 8c Martha's Tile, Inc. 



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1111 W. Washington Street, Waukegan, IL 60085-5397 
(4 Doors W. of Waukegan H.S.-Washington at Jackson) 

Office: (708) 623-0854 Home: (708) 356-3512 

■ FAX: (708) 623-9403 

S Mobile: (708) 533-2186 Beeper: 1-800-402-3426 

8 MON.. TUES., FRI.-8:30 AM-5 PM 

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■ SUNDAY - CLOSED (By Appointment Only) 

g For Your Convenience-We have 24-Hour Answering Service and 
S Beeper System for immediate help or information 



Effective Nailing Techniques 




Toenailing Driving nails in on ihc slant, 
and ai opposite angles to eacli other. Nails 
driven at an angle offer greater hold than 
those driven straight, and by 
alternating the direction of the 
slant, an even stronger hold 
is achieved. 



Knee Nailing Nailing directly through 
the face or width of a board s surface. Se- 
lect a nail that is 2'/2 to 3 times longer than 
the thickness of the top board. If several 
nails need to be placed, stagger them 
slightly to avoid splitting wood along the 
grain. If nailing through a board face into 
the end-grain of another board, use a 
lon!!er nail, or a grooved nail for secure 
hold. 





r///A/ 
BoAf^O 



Blind Nailing Driving a nail so that the 
head is concealed on the finished surface. 
Generally used to attach tongue-in-groove 
lumber (paneling or flooring) to underly- 
ing structure by nailing down at an angle 
through the tongue. This technique con- 
ceals the nail head, and also prevents gaps 
between individual pieces of wood. 



■ Extract nails with a pair of pincers, or 
with the claw end of a claw hammer. Be- 
fore applying leverage, place a small piece 
of wood urider the hammer head to prevent 
surface damase to the work. 





Gluing of joints Application of glue be- 
fore assembly with nails adds strength to a 
joint. Use white wood glue beaded or 
brushed on. Once parts arc pressed to- 
gether, nail the joints, and clean any excess 
glue with a damp cloth. 

For free literature on nail types and selec- 
tion, tips and techniques, contact Keystone 
Steel & Wire Co.. manufacturer of high- 
quality. American-made nails for over 100 
years. Write: 7000 S. W. Adams Si.» Peo- 
ria, IL 61641. 



Mr..^r— _ . ■ J Tiv^riM;rti» 




•mia^t: 



re you look you*ll see 
our quality construction 

Mm 

Exciting extras Jor 
your new home, 

• Exterior Sidings 

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• Noxclad Windows 

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for a Umited time. 




WBlconw Komo 



TRIPLE "A" BUILDERS 

, 34390 Rt. 45 • Lake Villa. IL 
708-223-7900 



J 



32 Lakeland Newspapeii 




Friday. February 14, 1992 









m 



Attention to detail 
makes this home speclall 
The two-story foyer flows 
easily into the master 
suite, formal dining room, 
and spacious activity 
room. The activity room 
includes a large bay win- 
dow, fireplace with raised 
hearth, built-in bookcase, 
wet bar, and access to the 
back porch, breakfast 
room, or master bath. 

The master bath, 



which Includes a double 
vanity, garden tub, and 
separate shower, is 
unique In that it is acces- 
sible from the great room 
as well as the master bed- 
room. The master bed- 
room overlooks the front 
porch and includes a 
large walk-in closet. 

Also accessible from 
the great room arc the 
breakfast room and 
kitchen. The breakfast 



room overlooks the back 
porch through a bay win- 
dow, and the spacious U- 
shaped kitchen features a 
convenient work triangle, 
built-in pantry, and plenty 
of cabinets. Adjacent to 
the kitchen are the laun- 
dry room, a half bath, and 
an office or bonus room 
with built-in bookcase 
and a closet 

Upstairs, this home 
has two more bedrooms. 



Each has a walk-in closet 
and a dormer nook. Both 
rooms share a common 
bath, and the bath has a 
separate dressing area 
with double vanity. The 
bedrooms are joined by a 
balcony that overlooks the 
foyer. 

This home is designed 
for a basement founda- 
tion. The basement stairs 
are accessible from the 
kitchen and lead to a 



drive- under double gar- 
age. 

The exterior of the 
home is enhanced with 
horizontal siding, match- 
ing shuttered windows 
and doors, three dormers 
with arch top multi-lite 
windows, and three plan- 
tation or New Orieans 
style porches. Each porch 
includes decorative col- 
umns and its own stair- 
case. 



This is a computer 
generated plan. The plan 
is number 3404. It in- 
cludes 3,469 sq. ft of heat- 
ed area. All W. D. Farmer 

plans include special con- 
struction details for ener- 
gy efficiency and meet 

FHA or VA requirements. 
For further information, 
write W. D. Farmer, P. 0. 
Box 450025; Atlanta, Ga 
30345. 



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irs our Aulo & Honrie Premium 

Advantage. Call today to 

see rf you qualify. 



RON BLOMBERG 

108 Center St. 
i| Grayslake, IL 60030 
m (708) 223-2888 




WILLIAM D. STANLEY 

1 1 1 Cedar Ave. 

Lake Villa JL 60046 

(708) 356-7672 




ROGER R. LUTZ 

33451 Sears Blvd. 

At Route 45 

WildwoodJL 60030 

(708) 223-2300 



SSBZ 



'^ ■L-^J.^'g 



Li y Ji.i .^.upp 




INS 



® 



AUTO HOME BUSINESS HEALTH LIFE 

© 1992 American Family Life Insurance Co. 
Home Office— Madison, Wl 53783 



If you're thinking about buying a new or used cor, 

boot & motor, snowmobile, motorcycle, mobile 

tiome, travel trailer, camper... 

Let us help you flnarice it! 

American Family has a simple system for providing you with fast, 
convenient financing. You don t have to be on American Family 
Policyholder to quality. In fact, all you have to do is call us. One call. One 
form, No hassle. We think it's the direct way, the personal way, the easy 
way to finance those purchases. All It takes is a phone call to put the 
wheels in motion. Call us today. 

We can arrange It. 



E 



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Radiant fldor 






What's old is what's 
new again In today's 
home heating systems. 

Radiant undcdloor 
heating was first intro- 
duced in the United States 
after World War II is mak- 
ing a steady comeback, 
especially in new hous- 
ing. 

Still one of the most 
I common heating systems 
' In many European coun- 
tries, radiant floor heating 
was popular in the North- 
east during the 1940s and 
1950s. 

At that time, metal 
tubing was laid and con- 
crete llooring was poured 
over it. Unfortunately, the 
lime in the concrete, im- 
proper installation and 
poor controls began to eat 
away and disable the sys- 
tems. These factors, com- 
bined with new forced-air 
heating systems, caused 
the demise of radiant 
heating in the mld-slxtics. 

However, with the ad- 
vent of durable plastic 
piping, new high-tech 
flooring and better con- 
struction practices, 'many 
J consumers are now con- 
sidering the option of ra- 
diant floor heating. 

Comfort is the moti- 
vating factor for today's 
more discerning new 
home buyer. For the most 
part, people just don't re- 
alize they have choices in 
a heating system. With so 



much emphasis on cffi 
ciency and energy savings, 
many homeowners are 
finding the hydronic 
licating, especially radi- 
ant underflobr heating, 
fits the bill. 

Unlike forced-air fur- 
nace systems which rely 
on moving air to deliver 
heat to a room, radiant 
heating works by sending 
warm water from a central 
boiler through tubing In 
or underneath the floor. 

Radiant heating Is a 
closed loop system. This 
means that a limited 
amount of water is recir- 
culated through the sys- 
tem over and over again. 
In fact, most residential 
systems hold no more 
than a few gallons of wa- 
ter. 

The warm floor radi- 
ates its heat into the room 
at a constant comfortable 
rate, with little or no tem- 
perature difference be- 
tween floor and celling. 
No bulky baseboard 
heaters or registers are 
needed, so furniture can 
be placed anywhere. 

In contrast, most 
forced-air systems cannot 
provide a consistent room 
temperature. Because 
warm air rises, much of 
the heat ends up at the 
celling, while the floor 
remains cool. Uncomfort- 
able drafts, temperature 
swings and cold spots also 




creeps from under the rug 



can be a problem. 

With this type of hy- 
dronic heating, however, 
the temperature of the 
floor, in most cases is gov- 
erned by the outdoor 
temperature and the rate 
at which heat is lost from 
the room. * 

If a thermostat is set at 
70 degrees, the floor sur- 
face temperature may 
range from 72 degrees on 
a mUd day to 85 degrees 
on a very cold day. Gener- 
ally speaking, the colder 
the outdoor temperature, 
the warmer the floor be- 
comes—although it never 
gets so warm that it makes 
wearing shoes uncom- 
fortable. 

Because heat Is deliv- 
ered at a constant, even 
rate, users arc typically 
more comfortable at a 
lower thermostat setting. • 
In addition, an entire 
house docs not necessar- 
ily have to be heated at 
the same temperature. A 
radiant heating system 
can be zoned according to 
area (such as bedroom or 
living room) with the use 
of a separate thermostat. 

As a result, radiant floor 
heating generally con- 
sumes up to 30 percent 
less energy than other 
heating systems. Some 
radiant heating systems, 
In certain applications, 
can use only half the en- 
ergy of their forced-air 



7^ 



Custom Decks & Gazebos 



, 



In ( ir.iliM- Dfi k liiiik 



J- . •' I ■ t " ' ' 



i-.i-;* 



Special Creative Deck Builders is offering a 
ro f^o/ivnwi $500.00 savings on any deck or gazeh< 
A^^t ordered by February 29, 1992 
(yjj^rl and built by May 30. 1992! 



A beauiifid custom deck or gazebo from Creative Deck Builders 
will add to the enjoyment ami value of your home! 




fj^ are experts in creating the perfect 
outdoor entertainment environment to 
enrich your personal or family lifestyle 

which can include: magnificent multi-level 
decks with inviting stairways, charming. 

seating areas, flower boxes, cocktail tables, 

bars, beauiifid BBQ cooking and service 

areas, lovely garden trellises, showcase 

gazebos and comfortable green rooms! 



'reative Deck Builder's 
approach to each project is 
quite simple... 

Listen carefidly and spend each 

dollar very wisely to insure the 

total satisfaction of every client's 

requirements and needs within 

their budgetl 

We feature the highest quality 

construction by professional 

craftsmen using otdy 

PREMIUM grade Cedar, 

Redwood and Treated woodi 

Plus, we pride ourselves in.... 

- Competitive Pricing ■ 

- Creative Custom Designing - 

- Building to all Local Codes - 

and most importantf 

- our clients* referrals - 



For a Free In-home Design and Estimate, Call... 



Creative Deck Builders 



, Inc. 



•21 75 1 lair l»;n Itojuj. jHufirio^klMiiM. IIIuiV.i> OHO I Ty 



The Prhfe^siSnai Deck and G^zetfo Builderst 




counterparts. 

One consideration with 
radiant floor heating is 
what kind of floor and 
floor covering will be used 
in decorating. One thing 
to keep in mind Is that 
whatever the floor is cov- 
ered with will impact the 
level of heat wliich is 
emitted into the room. 



For this reason, surfaces 
such as linoleum or hard 
wood are the best choices. 

Carpet also may be 
used, with lower nap 
plush carpets preferred, 
generally speaking the 
deeper the carpet, the 
more it inhibits the heat 
flow from the floor. In ad- 
dition, thinner, denser 



pads work much better 
with radiant floor heatUig 
than thicker, urethane 
pads which are designed 
to insulate. 

Consult a professional 
heating contractor who 
has had experience with 
radiant underfloor 
heating to decide if this 
system Is right for you. 



Recycling trends 1990-1991 



100 



c 

(D 




. 20 



Newspapers 



Other 
paper 



Cardboard 



Aluminum 
cans 



Other 
metal 
cans 



Glass 



Plastic 
items 











The 

Largest 

Selection 

Of Kitchen 

Carts In 

The Area. 

starting 
At Only 

$89^°! 



„ »■■■. -t .i^i — .. ■ 



34 lakoland Nowipaport 



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Friday, Fobruaiy 14,1992 



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N'ewBpapere 






et a hdme-energy audit to stay cozy 



A hard-working fur- 
lacc wastes valuable en- 
Si^ and burns up your 
money quickly. Though it 
isn't possible to eliminate 
all wasteful use of fuel and 
get every penny's worth of 
performance; significant 
fuel and money savings 
can be achieved when 
homes are properly insu- 
lated. 

Virtually every house 
needs to be weatherized. 



Many projects are easy to 
complete and high-per- 
formance products should 
be used. A few of the pro- 
jects are obvious: seal 
leaky windows and doors, 
insulate walls and ceil- 
ings, and wrap hot-water 
heaters in blanket insula- 
tion. 

The first step is to find 
the areas of air leakage. 
These gaps in your home 
let in cold air and permit 



warm air to escape during 
winter. This makes your 
furnace work harder. If 
you have an electric- fired 
oil burner, you will use 
more electricity and more 
oil. 

These same gaps let in 
hot air during the sum- 
mer, forcing your air con- 
ditioner to work harder. 
This not only increases 
your electric bill, but it 




#- ==^, 







.311., ■ M ■ ^ 





(Walk out lower levels offer families extra living space 



Garden homes feature extra living space 



\ Many garden homes 
' today feature walk-out 

lower levels. Hilly terrains 
* epable builders to 

enhance the designs of 

these garden homes 
' which are designed to be 

finished into additional 

living areas. 



Extra higli finished 
ceilings and oversized 
windows add more light 
and openness. The utility 
areas are even planned to 
maximize livable space. 

Buyers can either 
purchase these homes 



with levels finislied, or 
tliey can wait and finish 
!hem when they may 
require extra living space. 
Finished lower levels not 
only create extra room for 
entertaining and living 
needs, but add value to 
tlie home as well. 



New choice — ^wood flooring 



Key reasons for choos- 
ing the warmth and 
beauty of wood floorings 
are: 

First, wood flooring 
products offer the same 
advanced factory finishes 

, found on most types of 
sheet vinyl flooring, 

;, hence their easy care 

|>,characteristics. 

Ii|i| Second, wood flooring 

F r'iJys one of the few flooring 



products that lasts for 
generations and yet can 
be regularly updated as 
design trends change. 
This makes wood a very 
good investment in the 
long run. 

Third, there's a rela- 
tively new category of 
wood flooring, called 
Longstrip prefinislied 
laminated flooring, that 
can be permanently in- 



stalled over most existing 
kitchen flooring materi- 
als, an economical alter- 
native to other products. 

Add the fact that wood 
is naturally hypoaller- 
gonic, it doesn't trap dust, 
poUen, insect eggs and 
other allergens — means It 
provides a healtliy envi- 
ronment for food 
preparation and family 
dining. 



I .■ 



me Grown Girl Ma^ 

Look Who's Selling Florida 






Liz Blederer of ERA Airport Realty in Orlando is 
specializing in Commercial, Investment, and Home Sales. 

Leave your snow shovels behind! 
Come see me In the Sunshine State. 

(407) 380-6661 
ERA Airport Realty 

5425 S, Semoran Blvd. Suite 2 Orlando Florida, 32822 



also places an added 
power drain on the local 
utility.. 

A utility's study takes 
into consideration the 
style of home, its age and 
number of occupants. It 
will look at the heating 
system to evaluate annual 
fuel use and cost and it 
wiU review the air-condi- 
tioning system perfor- 
mance and cost. Utilities 
often recommend 
conservation measures, 
estimate the cost of 



Installation, and estimate 
annual savings. 

The specific conserva- 
tion actions most often 
recommended include 
caulking and weather 
stripping around doors 
and windows; insulation 
for ceilings, walls, floors, 
ducts and exposed pipes; 
installation of storm win- 
dows {or quality window 
insulator kits) and storm 
doors; and using a set- 
back clock thermostat 

Utilities also provide 



information about the 
payback period (the " 
amount of time required 
to recover the cost of the 
conservations measure) 
for each wcatherization 
upgrade. 

You will save money 
on utility bills. While it 
may take several years to 
recover the cost of some 
upgrades, homeowners 
often forget that many of 
the improvements can 
add immediately to the 
market value of the home. 



Home decorating can be fun 



Home decorating 
doesn't have to cost a lot 
of money. The following 
are some ways to add cre- 
ative touches to your 
home or apartment with- 
out draining your bank 
account. 

For your child's bed- 
room, think colorful, 
comfortable and practical. 
Don't let your "best" dec- 
orations be ruined by ac- 
cidental stains and spifls 
simply because they were 
out on display at the 
wrong time. 

Instead, try decorating 
with attractive but more 
easUy replaceable items 
such as stuffed animals 
and throw pillows. Cover 
newly painted walls with 
drawings or pictures of 
your child's favorite car- 
toon and movie charac- 
ters. 

Use plenty of pastel 
colors to decorate, since 
they can have a soothing 
effect. Remember to take 
proper safety precau- 
tions — always place po- 
tentially dangerous "hand 
and mouth-tempting" 
objects high on shelves 
and well out of your 
child's reach. 

Decorating the den or 
family room doesn't have 
to cost a lot, cither. Dis- 
play your favorite family 
portraits and other 
"collector's items" that 
have been hiding in the 



Do You Know 

Who's Calling 

When Your 

Phone Rings? 

Tlie CALL IDENTIFIEU™ 

has tho answer. 

With a Con Identifier nnd 

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basement for years. In- 
stead of nails, use Scotch 
Removable Mounting 
Squares to hang certifi- 
cates, awards, postcards 
and other lightweight 
Items. The squares con- 
tain a pressure-sensitive 
adhesive on both sides 
that won't leave holes or 
scars on most wall sur- 
faces when it's time to 
"redecorate." Four squares 
can support weight up to 
one-half pound. 

Brighten your kitchen 
by maWng a colorful nap- 
Idn holder to post conve- 
niently on the wall 
nearest the kitchen 
table — it's both a time and 



space saver. Slightly 
yellowed or peeled 
wallpaper, scratches and 
other "less than perfect 
spots can be covered 
easily with a unique 
calender or wall clock that 
matches the room's decor. 

Spruce up mas- 
ter/guest bedrooms with 
plaques, posters, and 
decorative mirrors, and 
replace shower cur- 
tains/bathmats to boost 
bathrooms. 

Finally, use your cre- 
ativity to come up with 
some additional decorat- 
ing ideas. Those simple, 
personal touches really 
will make a big difference. 




9, 



, , WINDOW & DOOR CO. 

t^ rj /"-I C"! Pi T\ ^^""^ ^^ f^ndpa., w*iKon^,iL toon 

rt^Llo lull 708/526-5775 



Wood Replacement Windows 



CUSTOM MApE TO 
YOUR REOUIREMEtJTS 





New 
Loc^ 




Double-Hung 
Windows 



Custom-Shape 
Windows 

CALL FOR FREE 

IN-HOME ESTIMATE. 



Excellent Quality 

Expert Installation 

Fair Prices 



SEE US AT OUR BOOTH AT THE 

1992 LAKE COUNTY HOME SHOW 

FEBRUARY 22 & 23 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

1-294 & RTE. 22 





MartcfCord, 



*■*. 



Friday, Febmary 14, 1992 



Laicoland Nowspapon 35 



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■'••^•'''•'^"""^''^"^•'■^Tr^mv'amftft'ii^*-^-'----''"-"'''''^^^^ ^..-.^ 







OTICE 




(708) 223-81 61 



1^7^*=^^^ 1- iiJ>'\'!e> 



OBITUARIES 



SHIRLEY AUGUSTINE 

Age 63 of Ocean Springs, MS, formerly of Round 
Lake Beach, died Sunday, February 2, 1992, in Biloxi, 
MS. She was a native of Chicago and had lived on the 
Coasi since 1988. She resided in Round Lake Beach 
from 1972 lo 1988. She was a Catholic, and attended 
St. Alphonsus Catholic Church. 

Survivors include her husband, Albert Augustine of 
Ocean Springs, MS; four daughters. Donna Hyde and 
Norma Crawford of Ocean Springs, MS; Carol Grctsch 
of Charleston, S.C; and Gina Augustine of Round Lake 
Beach; four sons, Albert E. Augustine of Chicago; 
Robert Augustine and Michael Augustine of Biloxi, 
MS; and Russell Augustine of Round Lake Beach; 17 
grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. 

Interment was at Greenwood Cemetery in New 
Orleans, LA. 

THOMAS J. KULAWIAK 

Age 48 of Loon Lake, Aniioch, passed away Monday, 
February 3, 1992 suddenly at St. Mary Hospital, 
Rhinelandcr, WI of an apparant heart attack. He was 
bom March 4, 1943 in Chicago, the son of the late 
Joseph and Stella (Golonka) Kulawiak. He moved to 
Loon Lake, Antioch permanently in 1965. Mr. 
Kulawiak was an Eagle Scout and a graduate of the 
University of Illinois Circle Campus, Chicago, as a 
Design Engineer. He had worked for several years as a 
Design Engineer for GTE in Northlakc, IL, and 
presently was the Site Assistant Superintendent II at 
Illinois Beach Stale Park. 

Survivors include 2 Aunts, Irene Sevcrino of 
Memphis, TN, and Lillian Golonka of Aniioch; an 
Uncle, Mitch Kulawiak of Michigan and many friends. 
He was preceded in death by two Uncles, Stanley and 
Frank Kulawiak, 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial were 
held Friday, February 7, 1992 at St. Peter Church, 
Antioch. Interment was in Mt. Carmcl Cemetery, 
Antioch, Strang Funeral Home, Antioch handled the 
anangemcnis. 

HARRY R. RUDDEN 

Age 85 of Portland, Oregon, formerly of Island Lake 
passed away Saturday, February 1, 1992 at his home in 
Portland. He was bom June 29, 1906 in Chicago, tlic 
son of the late John and Anna (Keller) Rudden. His 
marriage to Jeanette Barr took place on July 21, 1930 in 
Chicago. For 44 years he was a truck driver for the 
former Gold Star Motor Service of Harrington, and 
Gumprccht Trucking of Crystal Lake, and was a 
member of the Teamsters Union and a Charter Member 
of the Island Lake Lions Club. He was a veteran of the 
U.S. Army during WWH. 

He is survived by 2 sons: Raymond (Barbara) Rudden 
of Crystal Lake and James Rudden of Portland, 
Oregon; 2 daughters: Carroll Rudden of Huntley, IL 
and Charleen (Clyde) Bond of Mokena, IL; 9 
grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. He was 
preceded in death by his wife Jeanette in 1974; 2 
brothers and 1 sister. 

Visitation was Tliursday, February 6, 1992 at the 
Qucrhammer Funeral Home in Crystal Lake; services 
were Friday, February 7, 1992 with the Rev. Nathan 
Anderson of Bethany Lutheran Church of Crystal Lake 
officiating. Interment was in McHcnry County 
Memorial Park, Woodstock. Memorials may be made in 
his name to the Hadley School for the Blind, 700 Elm 
St., Winnelka, Illinois 60093. 

WILLARD BRATTHAUAR 

Age 77, resident of Fox Lake for over 10 years, 
formerly of West Chicago, died Sunday, February 9, 
1992 in Elgin. He was bom in Elgin on April 19, 1914. 
He served as the Du Page County Supervisor for 8 
years, and also was employed as a Land Purchaser with 
the Du Page County Forest Preserve Corrunission. 

He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy in WWII, a 
member of American Legion Post 300 of West 
Chicago, a member of the Knights of Columbus West 
Chicago Chapter, and the St. Bcbc's Catholic Church in 
Inglcside. 

He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Braiihauar (nee) 

Wiggerman of Fox Lake; his son. Theodore (Ann) 

Bratthauar and 2 grandsons, Christopher and James 

Braiihauar all of Hagerslown, Maryland. He was 

preceded in death by 2 brothers, Lester and Glenn 

Bratthauar, and by n sister, Fern Hauser. Friends called 

at the K.K. Hamsher Funeral Home (the Chapel on Ihc 

Lake), Fox Lake on Wednesday, Feb. 12, and funeral 

services were held Thursday, Feb. 13 at the St. Bebe's 

Catholic Church, Ingleside. Interment was private. His 

family would appreciate Masses in his memory. 



KENNETH M. LOE 

Age 69 of Lake Villa, died Sunday, February 9, 1992. 
He was bom in Chicago on February 27, 1922, and 
lived in the area for 43 years. He was a veteran of 
WWII, serving in the Marine Corps. He is survived by 
his wife, Mary; and children Diane (Ray) Grenus of 
Lake Villa; Sharon (Jim) Middleton of Millington, MI; 
Barbara (Peter) Abel of Lake Villa; James (Wendy) of 
Lake Villa; and Dennis (Laura) of Antioch, He is also 
survived by 12 grandcltildrcn and 1 greatgrandchild. 

Services were held Wednesday, February 12, 1992 at 
Ringa Funeral Home, Lake Villa witli the Rev. Aden 
Locst officiating. Interment was at Ridgewood 
Cemetery in Dcs Plaincs. 

DEATH NOTICES 





HelpWanted 
Parl-Tlmc 



BAUTE 

Ronald George Baule, 
38 of Libcrtyville. Arr: 
McMurrough Chapel, 
Libertyville. 
BLISS 

Carol M. Bliss, 36 of 
McHenry, Arr; 

Wauconda Funeral 
Home, Wauconda. 

BURNITZ 

MyrUc M. Bumilz, 89 
of Lake Zurich. Arr: 
Ahlgrim & Sons 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich. 
FOSTER 

Dorothy Alice Foster, 
81 of Grayslakc. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Chapel, 
Grayslakc. 
LINDSTROM 
Lois K. Lindslrom 
(nee Kesiner) 61 of 
Lake Zurich. Arr; 
Ahlgrim & Sons 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich. 
McCORKLE 
William F. McCorkle, 
II, 52 of Fox Lake. 
Arr; Strang Funeral 
Chapel, Grayslakc. 



NEWMAN 
Mary E. Newman, 68 
of Libertyville. Arr: 
McMurrough Chapel, 
Libertyville. 
SALINAS 

Conception K. Salinas, 
68 of North Chicago. 
Arr: Peterson Funeral 
Home, Waukcgan. 

SPENGLER 

Frank E. Spongier, 67 
of Park City. Arr: 
Marsh Funeral Home 
of Waukegan. 

THAYER 

Alvin L. Thayer, 63 of 
Round Lake. Arr: 
Justcn's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round 
Lake. 
WENSCH 

John G. Wensch, 74 of 
Silver Lake, Wiscon- 
sin. Arr: Strang 
Funeral Chapel, 
Grayslakc. 

WHITE 

Mary F. White, 90 of 
North Chicago. Arr: 
Salata Funeral Home, 
North Chicago. 



LOST MINIATURE- 
Schnauzer, neutered 
male, 4 years old. Pointed 
ears, on Feb, 6. Vicinity 
of Rollins and Wilson 
Roads, Ingleside. 
Daughter heart brokenl 
RowardI (708)587-8579. 

2-8-2 
REWARD MISSING 
since Dec. 14, in the 
vicinity of Beach Rd. and 
Rle. 59. Large Yellow 
lab/mix, female, with collar 
and tags. Name Goldie, 
Please contact Owner, 
(708)395-3377 or Vet 
(708)395-0100. 

2-TF-150 
LOST DOG FEIVIALE 
Bernese mountain dog, 
Heidi, black with white and 
rust markings. 75 pounds, 
will NOT bite. Large 
reward. Call (708)835- 
D567. 



^ 



2-TF-93/G 



Free 



a 



ATTENTION WE- 

are sorry, but we cannot 
accept animals in the 
Free Ads. Please contact 
the Humane Society. 



Personals 




IVIotixei* did bo xixttcli 
for txs. 

One of the things mother did that was most helpful was 
making her funeral arrangements long before she died. 
She didn't keep it all to herself either. She called us all 
and described what she wanted. I didn't agree with 
everything so we worked out something that I would like, 
too. Then she met with the funeral director and they 
wrote it down. 

She felt good because everything was taken care of and 
we felt good because we were included and knew how to 
proceed when the lime came. By her planning ahead we 
were relieved of many concerns at the time of the 
funeral. 

For more infonnation write or call for our free booklet 
on funeral planning. 



lf/^/(^a must. . . eaff 





"^At <eAa/,t/o» /A* W€,it " 




12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone: (708)587-2100 . (815)385-1001 



MtCROPlGMENT- 

Implantatlon, permanent 
eyelining, eyebrows and 
lip color, plus electrolysis 
by Sherry. (708)244- 
1640. 



LOVING COUPLE- 

seeks to adopt your 
priceless gift of life. 
Please consider us during 
this difficult time. We are 
financially secure, well- 
educated, loving couple 
just waiting to be full-time 
mother and devoted 
father. We can offer your 
baby a future full of love, 
happiness and security. 
CONFIDENTIAL MEDICAL 
AND LEGAL PAID. 
PLEASE CALL OUR 
ATTORNEY AT (21 7)352- 
1800. THANK YOU FOR 
YOUR CONSIDERATION. 
Tom and Catfiy. 
4-9-135 



UnplMiiiucd 

Considering Adoption? 

We spedallzB in personal & 
caring supportive services 

10 Birth Molhers, 
Alternatives offered and 
decisions mads by you. 
Confldonlla!. No cost lo you. 
Binh Maitiors call collect. 
Adoption Connection 
708-433-7821 



Certilied Paramedic 

Part lime, to work 
24-1/2 hr. "Red" shift for 

$250 for Private 

Ambulance Company. Gall 

(708) 244-1155 



Data Entry 

TorrpofOfy Part-Time Posilion, 

Prefer previous exparisnce, but will 

consldar 10 kay background 

Quatlty Information 
Services, Inc. 
(70B) 587-8170 





HelpWanted 
Pari-Time 

WORK AT HOME- 

Assembly, crafts, typing 
and morel Up to $500 plus 
a week possible. For 
information write 
SOURCE. P.O. Box 394 
Dept. #2133, Round Lake 
Beach, IL 60073. 
WORK AT HOME- 
Assembly, crafts, typing 
and morel Up to $500 a 
week possible. For more 
information write. Source, 
500 N. fvliciilgan. Suite 
1920. Dept. 2607-1464, 
Chicago. IL 60611. 



Asst. Manager 

Busy Gurnee Dairy 

Queen is looking for a 

Part-time f^anager 

Flexible hours. Call 

(708) 244-5283 

Ask for Jim 



DRUMMER 

Seeking Drummer for 

] working Weekend RockJ 

iBand.50's-60'sSeeger,{ 

Springsteen, etc. 

Call Michael Lescher 

(708) 587-8117 



Help wanted to clean 

apts., homes & offices. 

CallDeena 

Brooms R Us 

(708)526-1226 



= 5}^ LOOKING 







THE CLASSIFIEDS 




Phone:(708)223-9240 

EVCRUVSniVG NI^IORIALS 

Formeriy BUEHLBR MEMORIALS 
of Round Lake 

"A Lasting Tribute" 

33107 N. Hwy. 45>WILOWOOD, ILUNOIS 60O30 



Finest Design 
Finest Materials 
Rnest Craftsmanship 
No Wo* Too Large Or 
Too Small 



EXPERIENCE 
DIGNfTY 
REPUTATION 
Your Personal 
inspection Invited 



SERVING ALL FAITHS AND CEMETERtES 

V monuments V mausoleum 

V markers V cemetery lettering and 

V bronze plaques repairs and cleaning 

REASONABLE PRICES - All year long 



crtKon^.' ^uneJfcdloAa/ijel, S&d. 




gj^ujiutnt 



Fourth Generation Family offering 
sincerity sensitivity 8i con\fort in your 
time of need. 

We work with your best interest in 
mind to help ease your burden. 

We encourage you to learn more about 
your options. It's never too early. 
Inquiries arc always welcome. 



•Pre arrancementa 
•Vetcrana & Social 
Security Denefltt 
•Air Shipping Service 
•Tax Free Tniat 



•Uedlcal Science 
•PubUc Aid 
•Direct Crematton 
•Fore Thought 
Inaurancc Plan 
•Payment Plana 



^sm 



TcrsoimC caring for over SO ijtars 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Graydake 

223-8122 



P 



\4 



7 M 

y V', 






m 



i 



36 Lakokmd Itowipapon 



Friday, Fobruary 14, 1992 



I 






Lakeland Newspapers 



^^ ! |-l^■^^u.J^=^Ji.J>!i ' ^>?»^■ r JJJJ^~JJi^w,aiJyw^4;^' 



BH ' MtbJ'^,.. ■ J ! ?ffiJjiVT^ T \^d--'^ ' --rJU^.iM j l lj_-J i-jfet-j;,V. ' . rSg 5 1 




>j;^g^ 



OSSIFIED ADVERTISING 



(708) 223-81 61 



i17 



6" 

160030 



•RIES 

igand 
ning 

long 



S^. 



ering 
your 

ist in 

about 
early. 



ICC 

Uon 

.n 
It 

irs 
lake 






rvl4. 1992 



EMPLOYMENT 



HelpWantcd 
Papl-Time 




HelpWanted^ 
Part-Time 




Part-Time Secrotary 

Needed for Technically 

Oriented Sates Office. 10-15 

hrs. per week. Various 

responsibilities: travel 

reservations, light typing, 

record loeping, file 

maintenance & errands. 

Drivers License necessary. 

Send qualifications to: PAM, 

37191 Black Velvet Ln.. 

Wadsworth.lL 60083 



^ 



K. 



Recessiom 
Proof Job 

Earn $15 to $20 Hr. 

showing beautiful 

fashion jewelry. 

Ho InvesimenI 

No Delivery 
Flexible Hours 

Call Mrs. Wicklien 
(708) 395-8622 



Ti 



u 



\ 




TQSCARORA^^^PLASnCS, INC 



181 Ida Avenue 



AntJoch. illlnol* 60002 



I PART TIME OFFICE HELP 

1. 



Hours from 12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday. 
Typing, phone, filing, etc. Computer experience helpful. 
Must be reliable and dependable. 

Apply In Person Only 






IlclpWanlcd 
Full-Time 



91 



IlclpWanlcd 
Full-Time 




CABLE TV IN. 

STALLERS-lmmediate 
openings. Will train, re- 
quires pickup/van. Weekly 
-pay, health insurance, 
paid vacation and much 
morel Preferred Cable 
1(800)397-7389 or 
(515)984-6803. EOE. 
20-00-4 



$40,ooo/Yr! READ BOOKS 

and TV scripts. Flit out simple 

"llk8/don1 like" fomi, EASYI l^n, 

relaxing at home, beacli, 

vacations. Guarantesd paycheck. 

FREE 24 Hour Recording. 

801-379-2925 

Copyright #iL55WEB 



PRESSMAN 

A B Dick 360 & some 
bindery work. Salary 
based on experience 
Ask for John. 
. (708) 223-3089 



The lindenhurtt Early 
Childhood Center 

is acxepiirtg applicaikins for 

immediaie openings for lull and 

part time child care workers , 2 yr 

college & 6 hr. E.G. required. Call 

lor appointment 

(708) 356-7.288 



MARINE MECHANIC 

Wanted experienced Marine 
Mechanic. Salary negotiable 
upon experience. Resume to 
Universiry Motors, 1 920 1 2th 
Ave. North, Fargo ND 5B102 
or Call Al at: 
701-235-6478 



OTR TIRE 

Has ImtTwdlato openings for 
In&lde end outside sales- 
person. Great benefits and 
opportunity for growth. Tiro 
sales experience necessary, 
Apply In person: 
Mon.-Fri.. 9am-12:00 
29900 Route 41 

Uke Bluff 
(708)473-2828 



TGLGMARKETIHG 

Perfect for the Working 
Parent! $6.00 per hour 

plus benefits. Upbeat 
environment 

• (708) 244-0016 • 

__FuperiorjLjfionnel.' 

(No Fee To Applicant 



SECRETARY 

Advance Your Career... 

Mth a leader in ttia edicaliDnal industry. 
Our LJncolnshiie client is seoSting a 
dolail-orionlDd secretary to assist in 
(oinialting literature & informational 
pkgj, WP 5.1, strong l/ping and pfool 
readSng skits are essential. Cienl offers 
sKceplional iHnefils A a compelitive 
salaiy. Please call; 

708-520-9111 
equal opportunity employer 



Oticv 



TEMPORARILY 
UNEMPLOYED? 

Olsten is taking 
applications for: 

• Admin. Assistants 

• Clerical-No Typing 

• Data Entry 

• ReceptionisVSWBD 
•Secretaries 

• WP Operalors 
Wd,Per.5.1.DW4and 
Mac. Free cross-training 

to IhosB who qualify. 

708/459-1600 

Libeilyville, Mundeleln 

OLSTEN 

TEMPORARY 

SERVICES 

equal opporUily empfoyer 



TELLERS 

Immediate full and pari 

time openings for 

Individuals with excellent 

teller experience or fieavy 

cash handling 

experience. Prior teller 

experience is preferred. 

Wg also require excellent 

customer service skills. 

We offer a professional 

and friendly work 

environment as well as a 

competitive salary and 

benefits package. 

Cnmpr^nsallon will be 

based on exparience. 

Please note that 

applicants without 

relevant experience will 

nol be interviewed. 
Please apply In person 

at: 

GREAT LAKES 

CREDIT UNION 

2525 GREEN BAY ROAD 

NORTH CHICAGO, IL 

60064 

E.O.E. 

SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT 



Friday. February 14, 1992 



IlelpWantcd 
FulUTimc 



^R 



EARN EICTRB 

MONEY 

As A Sales Rep for 
Home Improvement Co. 

For information & 

application call 

(708) 623-7800 



Secretary 

SALES SECRETARY 

It's Your Move! 

Due to reconi promotion, our Deerfietd 
area dienl Is seeking a protessional 
and delit-odtnlod Secrolaiy to suppcrl 
3 safes managers. Strong WP5.1 and 
typing skills are crucial for success. 
(ilienl oilers an excellent benefits 
package and salary Irom $?2-25K. 
Make your move TODAYI 
Call 70B-520-91111 
e<fJal cpporturity employer 



DO YOU 
WALK? 

Would you consider 
walking for pay? 

MERRY MAIDS 

is hiring adults to 
walk selected neigh- 
borhoods distribut- 
ing promotiona 
flyers. 

Interested? 

Call: 

(708) 3^7-0800 



lExperienced 
Brake Press 

Operator 

Hurco back 

gauging 

experience 

helpful. Apply in 

person 
carter-notlmanncQfo 



r 







1551 McCormick Ave 
Mundelein 

EOE 



QUALITY 

ASSURANCE 

TECHNICIAN 

We are a manulacturer/ disiri- 
Ixjior ol replacement parts/ac- 
cessories to liie lilt trucit 
Industry, seeking a qualilisd 
individual witti linowlodgo in 
Inspection procedures & 
equipment such as CMM and 
warranty return processes. 

The selected candidate will have 
a solid luiowledge ol drafting and 
ttie ability to road complex 
blueprints witti close tolerances 
rJoar completion of an Engine 
ering degree or equivalent 
tectinical education is essential 
Excellent organizational and 
wriiion/verbal communication 
sltills. along Willi a meciianical 
aptitude are required. Working 
Knowledge ol mechanical parts 
in mobile equipment or 
automotive products a plus 

Your dedicalion and drive will be 
rewarded with a competitive 
compensation and benefits 
package in a challenging, fast- 
paced environment. For 
consideration, please fonvard 
resume wrifi salary history to: 

INTRUPA 
MANUFACTURING 

95 S. Route 83 
Grayslal^e.lL 60030 

Equ^ Opporturily Employet WRtW 



IlclpWanlcd 
Full-Time 




IlelpWantcd 
Full-Time 



tttt» H f »f »< » t*>» » 



Administrative 
Assl. to $24K 

Great \^iety * Work with 

major clienls overltie phone, 

Data Entry, Lite Bookkeeping 

& Word Processing 

(708) •244-001 6- 



^ 



HclpWantcd 
Full-Time 




llelpWunlcd 
Kull-Time 




perior JJrionneL; ; 



i'^posT/ajoBs*! 

j $23,700 per year plus s 
I tienefits. Postal = 
learners; sorters, clerks. 1 
I For an application and M 
[ exam information, call § 
I 1-219-736-9807, | 
I Ext. P9509 I 
I 8 am-8 pm, 7 days m 



Recepttonist/ ; 
Secretary 

[Fabulous starting salary for; 
: experienced dental 
•receptionist/word processor 

I (708) •244-001 6* 



perlorX^r*onne1.! I 
iii mm » n i>iiii n >t 



TRANSPORTERS 

DRIVERS 

No experience 

necessary, 

local-nationwide, 

start up to $35K. 

1-800-992-8005 



WANTED I 

ImmediatQ i 

opening for. i 
Full Time-May- I 
I October | 

I Part Time-Winter i 
I Months I 

i Contact Personnel Dept I 
I (414)889-4305 | 
iwONDERLAND CAMPi 
1 CAMPUKE I 



DATA 
ENTRY 

Full time position 

with Waukegan 

Title Company to 

prepare title 
insurance policies. 

Benefits. Call 
(708) 249-4041 



ACCOUNTING 

CLERK 

Contract Work 
$8.75 per hour 

Our progressive, start-up corripany 

is in need ol a coniraa arnployee 

10 operate switchboard and do 

filing and data entry work. Hours 

are Irom 6 am-5 pm. Contract 

employees receive no benelits. 

If inieresied, send resunne or 

apply in person to: 

NICHOLS ALUMINUM 

200 Schelter Road 

Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

(No pfwne calls please) 

equal opportunity errployer 



I Daily Report! 
Clerk 

Entry Level 

Position 

Located in 

Vernon Hills 

Call: 
(708) 367-3600 





-^:-":;«^lS% 



■MWN 



•SBvsrl.8k9 




wrn^.. 



ConnHy 

•Brfo<^ 



Rlctimond 



Grovf 



Johnstwrg 



HcHenry 



Crystal 
Uke 

McIIenry 
County 



'AnHocft; (^ 
.yiBa 



*Kenosha 



•Fox take 



•Rotjnd 
l8k« 



GrayalEste 



•llffisum '^'°" 

(J)tWfflJtworth 
KSumw WBukBflin 

* 



•islimdljMci 



Iiwltfe County 



•Korth 



•Waueonda 



•l^tKMeln 




Oaks 



iJTi"' r-\ -Vwnon La»rtyvlll« 

fianlnston .URtZuildiVv*; Hill* 



•KBd«ef *llncoltnhlf» ^^^ forest 



Barringlon 



Grow* 



Buffalo Grove 



•Palatine 




Highland Park 

• Deerfield 



•Nonhbrook 



NotKes 1 

Lost & Found Z 

Free 3 

Personals 4 

Auctions 5 

Business Personals 6 

Financial 7 

EMPLOFMEiVr 

Help Wanted Part-Time 19 

Help Warned Full-Time 20 

Errployrrent Agencies 21 

Business Opporlunili^ 22 

Work Wanled 23 

Child Care 24 

School/lnslrudion 25 

MARKET GUIDE 

Antiques 30 

Appliances 31 

Barter/Trade 32 

Bazaars/Cralts 33 

Building Materials 34 
Business/Otlics Equipment 35 

Eledronics/Connputers 36 

Farm Guide 37 

Firewood 3B 

Garage/Rummage Sales 40 



9IARKET GUIDE 

Good Things to Eat 
Horses & TacK 
Household Goods/Furniture 
Lawn/Garden 
Miscellaneous 
Medical Equip/Supplies 
Musical Instruments 
Pets & Supplies 
Tools & Machinery 
Wanled To Buy 

realestahs 

Homes For Sale 
Homes For Rent 
Homes Wanled 
Homes Builders 
CondcVTown Homes 
Mobile Homes 
Apart me nls For Rant 
Apanmonls Wanled 
Apt JHomes To Share 
Rooms For Ront 
Business Property For Sate 
Business Property For Rent 
Buildings 

Lols/Acreag^Farms 
Resorts/Vacalion Rentals 
Out of Aroa Property 



45A 
46 
47 
48 
49 



Cook County 

KEilL ESTATE 

41 Cemetery Lots 66 

42 Real Estate Wanted 67 

43 Real Estate Misc. 68 

JJ RECREATIOi\AL 

'^ Recreational Vehicles 70 

SnDwrrx)biles/ATVs 71 

Boals/Moiors/Etc. 72 

Camping 73 

TravelA/acalion 74 

Sports Equipment 75 

Airplanes 76 

^ 'mAi\SI»ORTATIOi\ 

Cars For Sale 60 

Rental^Lease ' 81 

Classic/AntiqueCars S2 

Sevj'ce 4 Paris B3 

Car Loans/Insurance S4 

Vans 85 

TrucksiTfailers 86 

Heavy Equipment 67 

Motorcycles 88 

Wanled To Buy 89 

SERVICE DIRECTORF 



51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



SERVICE 




DmECTORr 




Carpentry 


37 


Carpet Cleaning 


S8 


Concreto'Cement 


S9 


Dry Wall 


S10 


Education/lnslnjdior 


sit 


etedricat 


S13 


Handyman 


S14 


Healing/Air Condiloning 


815 


Landscaping 


S17 


Laundry/Cleaning 


S19 


Legal Services 


S21 


Moving/Slorage 


S23 


Painling'Oecoraling 


S25 



63 
64 
65 



Appliance Repair 

Blacktop 

Builders 



81 
S3 
85 



ParaLegaLTyping Scn^ices S26 

Plurting 827 

Pools 823 

Professional Services S31 

Radto/TV Repair 833 

Remodeling 835 

Resumes S37 

Rooling'Siding 839 

Storage S41 

Tax Sen/ic8 S43 

Trees/Planis S45 

Wedding 547 

Miscellaneous S49 



Lakeland's Classified Ads appear in all 14 newspapers with a 

Readership of over 200,000 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Plest ch«ck your aj on the FIRST ln»rtlon dat». In the avwit of tn tiw w omtMlon, *• wil k» rotponibl* \ot ONLY the FIRST IncorrocJ 
insertion. Tha rwwsp^xjr wl tw raeponwbts tor onty lh« portion ot ttw ad Ihjl l« In mrw. Plwia rwtify tlw CtusVlsd Department In tfw evont of an 
©rrof wtlhin 1 ww* ot run d«B. CAhKELUTONS rnjit b* rrad* prior to 5 p.m. on lh« To6«lay t>^oft pt^Mation. 

Lakaiani Nwwfwipwi tmtvm lh» right to propwiy cluttty ■! K^trtltlng. adk or d«Ma any objactbribto wonJIr^g. or roJwJ any idwwtliomeni 
(or credko< policy rMtoni. , ^ , 

Alt Halp Wanted advefltaing It pub1i»hod under united hoadingB. Lakeland Nmmpapsrt doea not knowingly accept help wanled advertising iha in 
anyway vlolalet (he Hurrun Right* Act. 



Hours: Monday - Thursday 

8 A.H. • 8 P.U. 

Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - Noon 

DEADUNE: 

Wednesdays at 10 A.M. 



(708) 223.8161 

Fax.: (708) 223-8810 







PAYIMENT in ADVANCE IS REQUIRED 

FOR T14ESE ADS: 

• AcKwtitars out of Uicsiand drixilatlon ar»a 

• BuilnMS Opportunltea • MoUla HomM 

. • Skuailora Wantod • Dobt Dtsddmwi 

• Qarags and Movir>o Sahw* 

•Found and OlvMway Ada ar« FREE. 

No pets wll (M oonskitmd torglvoeway. 



Lak«kir>d N«wspap«ii^7 



/•• 



*\ 









i 



•'I 



m 



U- 










UelpWanted 
Full-Timc 



IlclpWuiileU 
Full-Tim n 



POSTAL JOBS 

$11.41/Hr. to 
$14.90/Hr. 

For exam and 

application 

information, call: 

(219)769-6649 

Ext. IL 195 
8 a.m.-8p.m. 7 days 



\ ACCOUNTING 
CLERK 

I Cash application, 
: computer literate. Bank 
: recs, Lotus a must 

(708) •244-001 6* 



perlor JOefionnoL < • 



w 



Associate 
Trainee 

Local office of 
national company Is 

looking for 2 

associates that are 

career oriented, hard 

working, earn while 

you learn, 

1st year up to 

$30,000 
Call Richard 

(708) 367-4900 



BENETTON 

1121 -120th Ave #31 

Lakeside Market 

Place 

Kenosha, Wl 

(414) 857-6933 

Seeks a responsible 

and motivated 

manager and assistant 

manager. 2 years retail 

experience a must. 

Excellent salary and 

benefits included. Stop 

In with Resume or call 

Don at Store 



RECEPTIOMST 

Mundelein Associ- 
ation Management 
needs full time person 
with pleasant person 
alily, good telephone 
sklils and professional 
qualities. Must have 
good typing skills; 50 
WPM, some computer 
knowledge and gen- 
eral office experience. 

Contact Ted Muno 

THE WILLIS 

GROUP 

505 East Hawley Street 

Mundelein, IL 

(708) 949-60S0 






WORD PROCBSISOR 

A fast-paced management firm is looking for 
an energetic addition to the office staff. 

Applicants need to have Word Perfect 5.1 or 
5.0 experience, good organizational skills, and 
the ability to assimilate information. Minimum 
65 wpm required. 

Working hours are 8:30 am to 5:00 pm 
Monday - Friday. Send resume with salary 
requirements to: 

THE fllUJiS GROUP 

Ted Muno 
505 East Hawley Street 

Mundelein, IL 60060 
(708) 949-6050 



Experienced 

Responsible position requiring good short 

hand, typing, and dictation skills. Word 

processing experience desirable. This is an 

interesting, diversified job working for the 

Sales Manager. Excellent salary, 

Benefits and Profit Sharing. 

Please send resume or call for interview. 
_— (708)546-8225 

IHthe grieve corporation 

INDUSTRIAL & LABORATORY OVENS & FURNACES 
500 HART ROAD • ROUND LAKE, ILL. 60073 



SECRETARY 

Major law publishing finn, located In Rivenwoods, has 
a full time secretary position available in our Corporate 
Headquarters, 

To qualify you must have database knowledge and 
computer processing experience. Shorthand is 
required; work experience as a secretary is preferred. 

Company benefits including 100% tuition 
reimbursement, major medical, dental and profit 
sharing. 

For application apply In person or call Personnel 
between 9 am-3 pm. 
(708) 940-4600 Ext. 2281 

COMMERCE CLEARING 
HOUSE, INC. 

2700 Lake Forest Road 
RIverwoods, IL 60015 

(On Lake Cook Rd. nr. Milwaukoe Ave.) 

Public Tfonsportalion Available 
Equal opportunity Enployor M/F/HA' 




IlelpWanted^^^l 
Full-Time "^^^ 




IlclpWanlcd^^l 
Full-Timc 




EXPERIENCED DATA 

ENTRY OPERATORS 

Tho keys to your succcsa... 

...20 Immediala openings In 

Norlhbrook. Day and evening 

hours-llexible, Asalgnmont Ihru 

April. ExcsttenI pay 

structuro/benalits including 

vacalion pay. To find out how 

woVo unlocked tlw door to 

excoplional data entry 

opportunilios, call Karon at: 

(700> 54t-6220 

eoe rrVlMh 



ET 



13 



Sales Coordinator 
Trainee 

It you are aggressive, goal- 
oriented, tiave a positive 
mental attitude, need first- 
year earning of $25,000 
upward, and want unlimited 

income increases each 

succeeding year, you may be 

our person. Sales postlion 

open that offers financial 

security and annual 

conventions. We have a 

company-paid stock bonus 

plan. Internalional NYSE- 

Itsted company with proven 

training and marketing 

system. 

Send resume to: 

E. Gasparovic 

1700 Rand Rd., Suite 100 

Palatine, IL 60074 



EL 



Receptionist 

Full Time for busy phones. 

Word perfect a plus. 
Experience necessary. 
Opportunity for person 
who thrives on a hectic 
pacel NowinourtOlh 

year, moving soon to 

newly built offices. Send 

Resume/letter detailing 

what you can offer us. 

Noreen DeYoung 

MIDWEST TRADE 

1800 Grand Ave. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



JB 



Shop For 
A New Car 

Call 
(708)223-8161 



RECEPTIONIST 

Join a progressive 
comany irr the fast-paced 
marine industry. Excel- 
lent communication si^ills 
and good typing sl<ills 
necessary. Computer 
experience a plus. Full 
time to include weelt 
ends. Benefits include 
health insurance & 401 K 
plan. Apply in person, 

SKIPPER BUD'S 

71 Nippersink Blvd. 
Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-5800 



2nd or 3rd Shift 

Full Time 

Saturday & Sunday 

Days or Eves 

Part-Time 

CNC Mill 

Set-Up & Operate 

5 years minimum experience. Must have 

minimum 5 years with Yasnac fv1XI-I\^X2 

controls. Competitive salary, excellent benefits, 

paid lunch, drug free work environment. Bring 

resume to: 

MHS Automation 

1655 Wood Street 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 



Display 
ADVERTISING SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers is looking lor a uniquely qualiliod 

person lor our excHing sales deparirDent. The applicant must 

be a sell motivalor. highly organized and very dependable. 

This job will involve sales calls ouisitJe ihe otiice, 

The applicant musi demonslrale skills in interpersonal 

communicaiions creativity and personal responsibility. The 

applicant will work wilh a minimum amouni of supervision 

Since this irvvolves making calls outside (he main olltce, a car 

is necessary and gas compensation will be made. 

ff yoo are persistent, outgoing, dependable, responsble and 

organized you will be a success. 

For Interview appointment call 
Jill DePasquale 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
(708)223-8161 



Clerical 



COLLECTIONS 

No Experience Necessary 

Starting Rate $7.40 Per Hour. 

We are a north suburban mail order company 
with many repeat customers, and we want to 
maintain their friendship. Therefore, we are 
looking for individuals who can be firm, but not 
hard, who can insist without being demanding, 
who can be assertive without being antagonistic 
or overly aggressive. You will call past due 
accounts for payment. 

Requirements Include a pleasant phone 
personality and ability to use computer screens 
to identify customer accounts & payments due. 
Call or apply In person. 

LTD COMMODITIES, INC. 

2800 Lakeside Drive Bannocl<burn, Illinois 

(708)295-6319 

eoe m/( 



^ 



BuBincutt 
OpportunilifiB 

GREAT 
OPPORTUNITY- 

looking for distributors for 
unique weight loss and 
nutrition products Brand 
name company. Excellent 
training and support. Call 
(414)694-3304 
independent distributor. 
22-TF-14/G 

Work 
Wanted 




TIRED OF-CLEAN- 
IMG your own home? 
Give me a call. 
Reasonable rates, 
excellent references. Call 
Rene'. (708)546-1974. 
23-TF-94 



Child Care 




MOJ« WILL BABYSIT- 

your 1st through 5th 
grader, Ellis School 
District. Monday through 
Friday. S a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
$35 a week includes 
meals, snacks, half day 
and special days off. 
(708)740-0306. 

24-7-5 
MOTHER OF TWO- 
will babysit full or part time 
in my Fox Lake home. 
Lots of toys and T.L.C. 
Call anytime. Forest 
School Dist, (708)587- 
4649. 

24-6-5 




• PHYSICIAN* 

Wantod tor Industrial prac. loc. In 
Las Vogas. NV. Mud havo NV lie 
or bo o1l0!blo. Mal-pradlco paid. 
Comp. eal. Sond CV or call: 
Janot Brown, INDUSTRIAL 
MEDICAL GROUP. 3673 Polaris 
Ave., Las Vogas. NV 69103. 
(702)871-1721 



Long Term Health Care 

Facility in Long Grove 

has need of 

Pool NarsQ 

All Stitfts 

Competttiva Salary & 

BenefKs 

Contact Marilyn 
9:30-5 p.m. M-F 
(708)438-8275 



RN/LPN 

openings left for 
Night Shift, part/full 
time and weekend 

posilion open for 

RN/LPN. If 
interested, contact 

Sister Mary 

D.O.N. 

MOUNT 

ST. JOSEPH 

(708) 438-S050 

Inactive or Retired 
Nurses Welcome 




»^ 



Child Care 



M 



SchoalB/ 
Insiruclion 



M 



YOUR CHILD CAN- 

share a teacher/nanny 
with a h^undelein 2 year 
old boy. Will only lake one 
child, $130 weekly. Call 
Margret. (708)949-4549. 

24-8-4 
CPR QUALIFIED- 
Teenager will babysit in 
Lake Villa after school 
and weekends. (708)356- 
1263. 

24-7-18 



■DRIVING OPPORTUNrriES" 

Train lor new CAREER 

•"FULLY ACCREOrTED"* 

"100% FINANCIAL AID" 

ior qualified applicants 
Weekday: Weekend Training 

Call: (608) 837-7800 
DIESEL DRIVING SCHOOL 

Hwy * 151, Sun Prario. Wl 53S90 

iiicAanowiii 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 




TRAIN WITH THE BEST! 

AMERICAN AIRLINES MAINTENANCE ACADEMY 

IN AFFIUATJON WITH RICHARD J. DALEY COLLEGE 

• Become an A&P aircraft technician in only 20 months! 

• First year earning potential $25,0001 

• The only A&P School with hands-on large jet trainlngi 
■ Staie-of-ihe an, computer based trainlngi 

• Graduates earn an Associate in Applied Science Degree 

• FAA exams administered on-site! 

• Financial Aid availablel 

FREE ORIENTATION 
Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 10 am and 6 pm 

AT 
DALEY COLLEGE 

7500 S. Pulaski 

Main BIdg. Room 3223 

Chicago, IL 60652 

Admissions test and applications available at Ihe Oriertatlon 

For inlormation call 

(312) 582-9494 



Msdical 

•ULTRASONOGRAPHER* 

Neoded lor mobilo loule, loc. in 

SI. Louis. MO area. Must bo rog'dor 

digWo. Abdomen, OB/GYN. Echo, 

aid/o( Vascular eiipcr. 4 Hospital Route, 

Rural Communily Ahiosphoro. Send 

resume or call: BIOMEDICAL 
ULTRASOUND, INC. P.O. Box Z9I53, 
SL Lo«s, MO 63126, (314) 993-6364. 



Mocnui 

'PHYSICAL ASSTj^NURSE 
PRACTITIONEH' 

Needed for FT posibon, Primary Care 

positions. Attractice coo^ybcns. Sond 

CV to: Adnirrlstrator, 

SOUTHEASTERN GREEN 

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER, 7 

GiassvTOfks Rd., Gtowibofo, PA 1533a. 

E.OE. 



RN 
LPN 

Full or Part Time 

Evening & Night Shift 

Call tor inton/Jew 

HIGHLAND 

HOME 

Genoa City, Wl 
(414)279-3345 



Mwfnl 

*Flexiblo hours* 
NURSING CN.A.'S 

Hlllcrest Retirement 
Village is iooi^Ing tor a 
few more caring and 
responsible C.N.A.'s. 
All shifts available. 
*Slgn on bonus. 
' Flexible hours and 
FLOAT POOL. 
•Free meats. Union. 
If you are interested in 
joining our family 
please stop by: 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

60073 

(708)546-5301 



DIRECTOR OF 
NURSING 

Small Northwestern Lal<e County Nursing Home is 

seel<lng the employment of an experienced 

D.O.N, with a proven leadership record & who has 

a clear understanding of OBRA and related state 

and federal regulations. Generous salary, 

vacations, holidays, as well as 401 K. If you fit the 

above prerequisites. Please send us your resume 

or a letter of qualifications. 

We would like to meet with you. 

P.O. Box U.U. 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



Mtdlcal 

•SPEECH PATHOLCXSIST- 
RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC 

SUPERVISOR* 
•RADIOLOGY/SPECIAL 

PROCEDURE TECH* 

Needed lor FT positions at a 

progressive Commiinily Health 

Fadlily. Comp. salaries wHh 

excellent Iringo bonefils. Send 

resume or call: AUDRAIN 

HEALTH UNIT. 711 E. Jackson, 

Mexico. MO 65265 

(314)581-1332 E.O.E. 



Long Term Health 

Care Facility in 

Long Grove has 

need of 

Rehab Nurse 

for our day shift 
Competitive salary 
& benefits. Contact 
f^4arilyn 9:30-5 PM 

M-F 
708-438.8275 



J 



Da YOU enjcry OukJoor Ainoivlln 1 1. Ftihing, 
HunlfA}, SKIing, tfc 7 Do ¥0U Winl An 
Eetlltnl School SyUim, A' Sal* Rtct To 
Work ind PttMinl Envuofimtnl? Wi u» 
iiahJng 'PT Coendmtloi, Muti tupt>vi<», 
endap I coonfinUi Um cinJiapulmoru^ t 
rifiikbivaincludfig PT, OT, tptsch, nfiab. t 
cintopulrmntry nrci Muit b» ictnMd or 
cijitjlt In Wiihinjic*) 9tl« vl3 yrt rngni a 
lupwvtioiy (ipar. MK to « wnli ilui: Brim 
McOoMld, Oir. -nH-CHARGE TEAM 
LEADER. Will lupiivii* PT cir* i bi 
iDtpoittibIt Icr e hr. thll. Mtd TeliFTKlry ( 
oncology iiptr a »ug, Oitbttciogt, t p«dt 
itpar priJtntd. 

W*'r« I 110 bed Itcility beitKt In th* 
ihidQi* ol Ml. Rinir il lh« bill ol Pugil 
Sound i Mil Irom Ih* Ocitn Wi altar 
conipttiltvt iirago(/bfn»lltt, dllgienllili, & 
ctililictllQn fal«i « tuhbn rdmbutitmsnt. 
Eirptaymtnt borvt t rtkxtlion uilttin:* 
Ctll )'eOO-753-3441 I10S4 or und (mut* 
la: 

CAPFTAL MEDICAL CErfTER 

3gOO CopltDl MdII Dr. SW 

PO Bom IOOQZ 

Olymplo, WA 09907 

EECVAA EsTpst^H itA 



DIRECT 

CARE 

WORKERS 

New 6 bed home 
serving Autistic/MR 

teenagers in Park 

City, IL. We have 
4 openings for the 
11 p.m.-9 a.m. shift 
and 8 openings for 
the3p.m.-11 p.m. 

shift. $5.53/hour. 
with excellent 

benefits. Must be 
21+. Call 

BLAREHOUSE 

(708)299-2200 

EOE 






38 Lakotond Nowipapon 



Friday, February U, 1992 



^:::;,:-)*/Vl..ii^j^, 



\''^;vi 



I 



ES" 

I 

»••? 

)" 

i 

ling 

)0L 

590 



T 
1 

DS 




grea 



lion 



DGisr 

NOSTIC 

ECIAL 

•CH* 

ins at a 

;y Health 

oawHh 

ts. Send 

3RAIN 

Jackson, 

>65 

i.O.E. 




urse 

shift 
salary 
ontact 
-5 PM 

3275 






ndlMla.Fuhlng, 
I YOU Win) An 
K Salt PiK( To 
wrnin)? Wi iFi 
Muil tuptnit*, 
iflliopulmonary i 
. tp*<d), rthati, i 
U b« innud a 
I •r'3 yt( irgfTi a 
y *nlt (tin: Bitrt 
IHARGE TEAM 
• PT ei(« ( bi 
Mk) Tilirmlry fi 
nMologir. t pfdt 

ity kxalw) In the 
Ih* bu« ol Pugtl 
Oc«an Wt Dllar 
U. dilartnliili. & 
m lalmtwrtamenl 
xHbn U(i4linc< 
J4 fir land rMuna 

AL CENTER 
loll Dr. SW 
0002 
A B8S07 



:cT 



:ers 

id home 
itistic/MR 
3 in Park 
Ne have 
js for the 
a.m. shift 
)nings for 
I.-11 p.m. 
53/hour, 
:cellent 
Must be 
Cali 

HOUSE 

99-2200 

OE 







Misccllanco 




ANTIQUE SEWING- 
machine, treadle. Oak, 6 
drawer cabinet, works, 
excellent condition. With 
attachments, $225. 
(708)223*1873. 
30-TF-95 

Appliances 

WASHER AND 
ER-QE heavy 
washer and matching gas 
dryer, excellent 
condition, $250 for pair. 
(708)587-81 15. 

31-7-19 
DRYER $150 OR 
best offer. (708)548- 
2443. 

31-7-20 

BuHinees/Office 
Equipment 

BEAUTY 

EQUIPMENT-hydraulfc 
chairs, reception desk, 
shampoo bowls, much 
more. (708)680-7290. 
35-7-93 



ALL STEEL 

buildings. New never 
erected. 40x42 was 
$6,177 now $4,964; 
40x120 was 13.635 now 
$10,295; 50x200 was 
$25,000 eel! for $18,995. 
Can deliver. (303)757- 
3107. 



Firewood 



M 



FIREWOOD FOR- 

Sale, delivery available. 
(708)526-5107 afternoon 
or evenings. 




Seasoned 
Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co* 

Land Clearing 

Tree & Stump Removal 

Fully Insured 

708-526-0858 



s 



ElectronicH/ 
Compulera 

two RADIO # SHAK- 

model 4 computer, in like 
new condition. First $200 
takes both. (708)395- 
5546. 

36-7-21 



Horses & 
Tack 




IIorecB & 
Tack 



m 



HORSES BOARDED 

Beautilul Bam, New Stalls, 

Daily Turnout. Heated 

Lounge. Excellent Care, 

$200.00/Mon1h. 2 miles 

North of Richmond, )L 

(414) 27g-S060 



WOOD SHAVINGS- 

Kiln dried for better 
absorption. Bulk 
deliveries, 10 yards to 
100 yards. Trailur loads 
available soon. Call for 
price. 1(800)339-1700. 

i FOR SALE i 

S Hardly Used S 
S Barrel-Racer 15-1/2". J 
* Very light. Good for adult M 
S or child. Perlect Condition u 






$250 

438-8060 

Before 8 PM 



8 




BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 ,000 - Cash & Cany 
Hay, Straw & Horse Feed 

HORTON BROS. 

Bristol. WI 

(414) 8S7-2S2S 

Mon.-FrL 8-5 Sat. 8-3 



J 




■-'.5 



llouecholds/ 
Furnilure 

EIGHT PERSON HOT 
tub, 7'x9V. $3,500. 
(708)740-4846. 
43-7-80 
MISCELLANEOUS- 
furniture; sectional desk, 
lamps, etc. For sale. 
(708)223-1899. 
ETHAN ALLEN- 
Complete dining room 
set. $1,200; Stevens 
linen pub-back sofa. 
$275; Stratolounger 
recKnor. $175. (708)336- 
0457. 

BASSETT 

BEDROOM-setr quality 
made dresser with mirror, 
chest, king size 
headboard, and night 
stand; very good 
condition. $500 or best 
offer. Dining room table 
and china cabinet, $400. 
(708)680-1352. 
CENTURY NINE- 
piece Shin-Wa dining 
room set, $7,000. 
(708)438-1745. 
ELECTRIC OVEN- 
good condition, Harvest 
Gold, self-cleaning, 
Westlnghouse, $100. 
(708)973-1005 evenings. 
MAYTAG ELECTRIC- 
dryer, almond, very good 
condition, best offer. 
(708)587-8082. 
FURNITURE 
CHERRY-Queen Anne 
style, perfect condition, 
must sell, complete set, 
bedroom, $1,100. dining 
room, $1,700. (708)406- 
0166. 

43-9-97 




ilouBchoide/ 
Furnilure 



10 PIECE PIT- 

group, value. $3,000, 
sacrifice, $750. 5 piece 
black lacquer bedroom 
set, $395. Quean brass 
headboard, $79. Queen 
mattress set. new $125. 
3 pieces, sofa, loveseat, 
chair. $350. (312)404- 

8660. 

43-9-98 

FIVE YEAR CRIB- 

dresser, white and brass, 
mattress Included, asking 
$400 or best offer, 
excellent condition. 
Butcher block table, good 
condition. $40 or best 
offer. (708)223-0948 after 
5.m. 

43-8-B2 



oui^^n 



Miscellancou 



FULLY 
RECONDITIONED- 

commercial Foosball 
table, $400 or best offer; 
fully reconditioned 
Seeburg jukebox, 160 
selections takes 45's, 
sounds great, $900 or 
best offer. (708)356- 
0325. 

45-8-25 
PACE-SIDE TALK- 
1,0008 23 channel CB 
with antenna and coax 
cable, $100 or best offer; 
Sea trim tabs with 
hydraulics, 59-1/4' wide, 
new, $150 or best offer, or 
trade for 7-9 hp fishing 
motor; projector screen, 
$10. (708)949-4964. 

45-7-26 
POP-A-SHOT-DART 
with Cricket, video game, 
pin ball machine and 
shuffle alley. All in 
excellent condition. Can 
deliver. (708)362-6010. 

45-8-27 
27 PIECE DRUM KIT, 
Ludwig metallic red, dual 
bass and all the goodies. 
For more information call 
(414)862-6888. 

45-7-28 
USED STOVE-$100. 
Nagel silk screen, $250. 
Drafting machine and 
table. $200. (708)740- 
3061. 

45-7-29 
1968 CAMARO- 

doors complete, good 
condition, $200 or best 
offer. 1965 Starcraft 
Boat, trailer and 70hp 
Evinrude motor, $2,995. 
(708)356-8833 after 5 
p.m. 

45-7-30 
TWO NEW ROLL- 
Away beds with zipper 
covers. Toastmaster 
electric oven. Kimball 
1000 Organ. Best offer. 
(815)344-0607 or 
(708)587-7069 or leave 
message. 

45-7-31 
PIONEER 6 DISC-CD 
player. excellent 
condition. $225 or best 
offer. (414)862-6998. 

45-7-32 
SNOWPLOW FOR- 
Sale. 1 subcompact 
blade, manual type angle, 
$45. (708)381-3474. 

45-8-33 
CAMCORDERS- 
VCRo, wholesale, 42 
Brands, no tax, Free UPS 
delivery. Free camcorder 
buyers guide, (none for 
VCRs). Call with Model 
wanted for our price. 
(800)344-7123. 

45-00-14 
THE WORLD BOOK 
Encyclopedia, 22 
volumes, mint condition, 
paid $900 asking $700. 
(708)395-0559. 

45-7-16 



WEDDING 
DRESS 

Gorgeous white wedding 
dress detailed with pearls 
and iridescent sequins. 
Sweetheart neckline, long 
sleeves, medium length 
detailed train. Size 10. 
Retailed from Voile's at 
$625. Will sacrafice at $500 
or best offer. Leave message 
after 5 PM. 

(815)363-0542 



l^a 



DERMA SHIELD- 

The ultimate skin 
protection product made 
in America. Skin 
protection ranges from 
household cleaners to 
acids. For no obligation 
recorded message, call 
(319)678-2129. 
45-00-13 
WOMAN'S 

WEDDING. ring set, 
total weight, .80 carat, 
clearity Vs2 color "H" 
make offer. After 4 p.m. 
(708)497-3404. 
^^^ 45-7-14 
POOL TABLES- 
Gandy 5x10 ft. snooker 
table, recovered and 
delivered, $1,500. 
National regulation size 
pool table, leather drop 
pockets, delivered and 
recovered, $1,400. 
(815)344-7768 after 1 
p.m. 

45-7-1.'? — 




45A 



Medical Equlp7j 
Supplies 

HOSPITAL BED- 
EXCELLENT CONDI- 
TION, FULLY ELEC- 
TRIC, SIDE RAILS, 
PAID $2,400, WILL 
SELL $1,400. 

( 708)7JP-3 210. 

I'eta & 

Supplies 




COLLIE PUPPIES- 

AKC registered, Tri's and 
Sables, shots and "ready 
to go", satisfaction 
guaranteed. (414)763- 
6043. 




MALTESE DOG- 

female, white, papers, 3- 
1/2 years old, trained, 
$275. (414)857-6807 
after 5 p.m. 

47-7.P0 
ENGLISH 
SPRINGER-Spanlet 
AKC. 7 month old. house 
trained, male, to a good 
home. (708)615-0975. 

47-7-34 
OLD ENGLISH- 

Sheep dog, AKC, female 
puppy, house broken. 
(414)635-0551. 

47-7-85 
FULL BRED- 

Pomeranians, 3 months 
old. $275 with AKC 
papers. 3 female, '1 male. 
(708)669-2511 or 
(708)688-3201. 

47-7-7 
IT'S A DOGS WORLD 
pet grooming by Doreen. 
For appointment call 
(708)395-1436. 
47-7-6 
PARAKEETS FOR- 
sale, buy direct from 
breeder, all colons, babies 
or breeding stock. 6 
month guarantee. Shown 
by appointment only. Call 
(708)356-9328. 

47-8-7 



BCDogTbuhihg 

(BmERCmNES) 

See 
DiR^:rUuEAD 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAYI 

m 

The Aesisi Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT...VOLUNTEER 




We don'ldwlToyhonioleManlnialtlThByllvo their proflramtorthoeldsriy.provldooducaiJo 

Mil Ih/M gncaoed tl not tdopttd. W» ipay and for young E"Plo«"^ff «' V5??i11'w^ 
■ ' ^ — "orvthwapv program. THANK YOU FOH YOUR HEL 



nautar, conduct a dynamic p«t viiltatlorvtharapy 



education program! 

rotiraoiefit" 

HELPl 



Name. 



Address ^ ■ 

City, ST. . 

Zip Code 

Pleaae mall to: Asslsl Animal Foundation 
I P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (816)455-d411 J 



Individual 

Membership $15 

Family Membership 

$20 

Donation $ 




Pet8 & 
Supplies 

SIX MONTH OLD- 

Datmation, AKC register, 
male, shots, $200. 
(708)740-2527. 

47-7-141 
HAPPY JACK THIVER- 
MICIDE-recognized safe 
and effective by Center for 
Veterinary medicine 
.against hook, and round 
tapeworms in dogs and 
cats. Available O-T-C at 
better fann food and hard- 
ware store. 

Warned 



' ';■:w■l1-;v^}'^':-K■>:1•,■r^■;•w■•''//^*^^w«^<^^<v/:^"•^;•^x« 

stmicwDWErn'omm: 



Educaliony i 
InBtruclion 



Sll 




To Buy 



~^R 




CORVETTE WANTED- 

any year or condition. 
Also, antique cars, 
convertible, street rods or 
collector cars. Finders 
fee paid. (414)245-9395. 

NOTICE 

TO 

ADVERTISERS 



Rmm ch«ck iracjr ad en tit 
FIRST toMrHcn dilt. In tm cvvnt 
ol *n •cTor or omlMisn, «•« wil b« 
l««fon«U* hx OHLY ri* FIRST In- 
oorrtcl IriMTtJ^. tht n«wcp*{i« 
vt41 b« ittpannbh tor only lit pa- 
ton ol ffi* ad till li h •rtcr. PI««M 
noely ffi« ClMtiM D*p«ttn*n< h 
tit mitnt of m *ri«. CANCELLA- 
TIONS miMt b« midt prfof to S 
p.m. on <h« TuMday bvlora 
puUfeaton. 

Ijkwitni Nvwipiptri ttHtvt* 
lie righl la (lop^f dudtjf tl 
■dvwbting, tdl or d«<«(t my eb- 
jtcHontblt vntdng, or itftct tny 
•dvwVwnwit fer atdl or policy 
rttiont. 

All Hilp Wanted tdytrtiing It 
puUI#>*d unim unllttd hcadngt. 
Lakatand N«wtp«p«rt doM not 
KiKMtngly aatpl h*^ mnttd i<5- 
vwlting B>*t In any way vlt^ilar, 
^ Humai Rightt Act 



ROGERS 

ELECTRICAL-Service, 
fixtures, outlets, fans and 
dimmers installed. 
Additions wired. FREE 
estimates, low rates. 
Danny Rogers, (708)949- 
0731. 

S1 1.-8-1 

Healing/Air 
Conditionin 

REMODELING SALE- 

80,000 BTU gas home 
furnace for garage use, 
$200. (815)344-3607. 

S15-7-17 _ 

ProfcBBional 
Scrviccfl 

i VIDEOTAPE- 

family events, homes, 
school events. Allison. 
(708)546-0898. 
S31-7-1 



Discover RenBng 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Roun d Laka Park 



Tnrea/ 
Plante 



S4 5 




TREE WORK 
WANTED 

• Tree Trimming 

• Tree Removal 

• Beautification 
• Stump Removal 

(708) 546.2061 




Remodeling 



JACK'S 
REMODELING- 

bathrooms, basements, 
partition walls, etc. Free 
estimates. (708)546- 
3759. 

835-8-2 



Wedding 




S4 7 



^ 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 
FIND IT.' 



CLASSJFJED 



WEDDING DRESS- 
Foel like Cinderella when 
you walk down the aisle In 
this gorgeous while wed- 
ding dress detailed with 
pearls and Iridescent se- 
quins. Sweetheart nock- 
line, long sleeves, 
medium longth detailed 
train. Size 10. Retailed 
from Voile's at $825. Price 
negotiable. Leave a 
message and I'll get back 
to you. (815)363-0542. 
S47-TF-24 




Buy 



lIomeB 
For Sale 




lIomcB 
For Sale 



LORIMAR ESTATES- 

nsw 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath 
Colonial with large family 
room, formal dining room 
and living room are 
perfect for entertaining 
guests. Associate owned 
(4141878-2410. 

50-7-112 

FOR SALE BY- 

Owner, Wadsworth, 
Ranch House, two 
bedrooms, one bath, 
living room, dining room, 
small kitchen, full 
basement, screened-in 
porch, deck off Master 
Bedroom, completely 
recarpeted, painted and 
wood trim, on park-like 
acre. $105,000. Call 
Tony or Rhonda, after 6 
p.m. (708)336-7099. 

50-7-105 
WATERFRONT 
TH REE-bedroom tri- ' 
level, with large great 
room, one half acre on 
chain. Owner/agent. 
$265,000. (708)395- 
6495. 

50-7-106 

CARPENTERSVILLE- 

3 bedroom, 2 full bath, 
fenced yard, 2 car 
garage, and oversized 
deck, $91,000. 

(708)428-5990. 
50-9-25 




llotneB 
For Sale 



FIVE ACRE 

FARMETTE-Lake 

.Geneva completely re- 
stored fun of the century 
farm house. Nature land- 
scaping, nice farm. Cali 
JoQ (414)246-2597. 
$220,000. 

cft.TF-irt/K 
BY OWNER ANTIOCH 
3,100 sq. ft Ranch on 2- 
1/2 landscaped acres, 
stocked pond, totally 
fenced, too many 
amenities to list. 
$278,900 call for 
appointment. (708)395- 
5546. 

50-7-35 
OPEN HOUSE- 

Wildwood 11, Sunday 1 to 
4 p.m. 17665 
Meadowbrook, 3 
bedroom, 12 year old tri- 
level, 2 baths, 2-1/2 car 
attached garage. ONE OF 
A KIND. (708)362-4624. 

50-7-36 
JOHNSBURG BY- 
owner. 2 bedrooms, 1 
bath, 1-1/2 car garage, on 
crawl, lot approximately 
65'xt50'x95'x152', 
hardwood floors, 
appliances included, 
move-in condition, 
$79,900. (815)344-6222 
days or (706)497-9210 
evenings. 

50-8-38 




NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE 
SHERIFFS SALE NUMBER: 91 Ml 035035 
Public f^iolice is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgement ol 
Foredosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above 
entitled cause on December 18. 1991, the undersigned SheriH 
o! Lake County, Illinois, wilt on Monday, March 30, 1992 at the 
hour ol 9:00 a.m. at 25 South Utica Street, 1st Itoor, 
Waukegan Illinois, or in such other room as shall be posted ai 
25 South Utica, Isl floor Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public 
auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and 
singular, the following described real estate mentioned In said 
Judgement situated in the County ol Lake, Stale of Illinois, or 
so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said 
JucJgement. to wit; 
P.I.N, 15-25-207-001 
Commonly known as: 1324 Knollwood Way. Riverwoods. IL. 

Together with all buildings and Improvements thereon, and the 

tenements, hereditaments and apparlenances thereunto 

belonging. 

IMPROVEMENTS: Single Family residence. 

TERMS OF SALE: 10% down by certified funds, the balance 

due wiihin 24 hours by certified funds only, no refunds. 

THE PERSON TO CONTACT REGARDING THE SALE: 

(Premises will not be <^>en lor inspection). 

Name: Pamela H. Levin, Garlield & Mere!, Ltd. Address: 211 

West Wacker Drive, 15lh floor, Chicago, Illinois 60606. 

Telephone: 312-332-1011. Attomeyl.D. No.: 26319. 



Business Space 

Grayslake 

In business district. 

820 sq. ft. 

Kitchen. 

Will consider 

remodeling. 

Plenty of Parking 

(708) 223-4581 






ffi 



NEW 
CONSTRUCTION-3 

bedroom, tri-level with 
finishod family pDom and 
tower level, pick your own 
colors, siding, carpeting 
etc. $89,900 indudes lot. 
(708)546-2060. 
50-9-23 
LAKE ZURICH- 
Assumable 7-3/4 percent 
A.R.M., 3 year old brick 
Raised Ranch, 3 
bednsoms, 3 baths, Irving 
room, dfnfng room, 
kitchen/dinette, oversize 
shed in backyard, all 
appliances, $165,000. 
(708)391-8348 days or 
(708)438-2987 evenings. 
No Realtors. 

50-7-104 
LAKE ZURICH 4- 
bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 2 
story, on 1/2 acre. 
Natural trim, hardwood 
floors, ceramic tile, 
Berber carpet. 2-1/2 car 
garage. 3 year old 
builder's home, by owner. 
$229,000. (708)438- 
6182. 

50-8-3 7 
Horace 
For R«nt 

THREE BEDROOM-2 

car garage In North 
Chicago. $550 a month 
plus deposit. (708)776- 
1024. leave message. 

51-e-8/G 
LARGE SECLUDED- 
older home, just North of 
Gurneo Mills, newly re- 
decorated, 3 bedroom, 2 
full bath, living room, with 
attached sitting room, 
extra lai^e kitchen. $875 
plus utilities. Call 
(708)816^415. 
51-7-9 



tary 14, 1992 



Friday, Fobruary 14, 1992 



Lalcoland Newspapors 39 



■■ n,Hi P -.^ „j . :„, ! .-J..i 






L-..^^.-*4^iB^_i^M 1 



C' ■ 



% 



H' 



\'\: i 






ir. .,, 




Homes 
For Rent 

WITH OPTIOK TO- 

buy, 5 bedroom home 
with poo! on 1/2 acre rural 
Round Lake, $1,100 a 
month and option. 
Tenant pays alt utilities 
and repairs. Security 
deposit, references, and 
credit check required. 
Call Sue altar 7 p.m. 
(708)740-3172 for 
appointment. No agents 

51-7-110 
MCHENRY AREA- 
small 3 bedroom, house, 
$575 a month plus 
security deposit required. 
No petsi (615)678-7931. 

51-7-39 
NICE CLEAN ONE- 
bedroom house with 2-1/2 
car garage in Round Lake 
Park, all appliances 
included. Washer and 
dryer, mini blinds 
available, now $600 per 
month and security 
deposit and utilities. No 
pets or waterbeds. 
(708)381-3918. 
51-7-40 

CondoK/ 
Town II(iin«;H 



Condoe/ 
Town IIomcB 



^A 



Mobile 
Ilomce 



^R 



LAKE VILLA BRAND- 

new Townhouses, full 
basement, 2 car garage, 
deck, appliances, 2 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
lake access, $110,500. 
Financing available, low 
down payment. No 
agents please. (708)973- 
1626. 

54-7-27 
VERNON HILLS- 
Unique 2 bedroom 
Williamsburg Condo, 
cathedral ceilings, 
modern decor, attic 
storage, utility room, 
attached garage, many 
upgrades, $79,500. 
(708)680^129. 

54-7-103 
WANT TO BUY- 
Libertyville, Austin Court, 
or Bryton Square Condo. 
Private party. (708)918- 
1544. 

54-8-10 
GRAYSLAKE THREE- 
bedroom duplex, like new, 
garage, range, 

refrigerator, air 
conditioning, carpeted, 
$850 a month, security 
deposit, no petsi 
(708)223-5301. 

54-8-42 



THREE BEDROOM- 

duplex, like new, garage, 
range, refrigerator, air 
conditioning, carpeted, 
$650 a month, security 
deposit required, no 
pets. (708)223-5301. 

54-7J.0L 
BY OWNER THREE- 
bedroom townhome in 
Grayslake, 1-1/2 baths, 
central air, washer, dryer, 
all appliances, garage, 
clubhouse and swimming 
pool, $83,500. (708)223- 
5484. 

54-8-8G 
ROUND LAKE- 

BEACH 2 bedroom 
townhome for rent. First 
month rent free. 
(708)834-0308. 

54-7-1 02/G 
ANTIOCH MANOR-2 
bedroom deluxe 
townhome. 2 car garage, 
2-1/12 baths, ceramic tile 
floors in bath and kitchen, 
full basement, whirlpool 
and fireplace. Available 
March 1. (708)662-1646 
or (414)537-2500. 

54-8-41 

NEW DUPLEX-3 

bedroom, 2-1/2 car 
garage, 1-1/2 bath, all 
appliances, new 
carpeting, full basement, 
Antioch area, $900 per 
month. (708)234-1206. 
54-7-102 

GURNEE 

TOWNHOUSE-2 story, 
2 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 
den with gas fireplace, 2 
car garage. Low 
assessments. End unit, 
r^any upgrades. 
$109,000. Seller 
motivated. (708)336- 
3729. 

54-8-114 




Apartmcnls 
For Rnni 



1988 CHAMPibN- 

14x70, warm and well 
kept, 3 bedroom. 2 bath, 
with garden tub in master, 
wood burning stove and 
central air, cathedral 
ceiling, with brass pedal 
fan, kitchen features a 
breakfast bar, dish 
washer, electric range 
and refrigeralor, fenced 
yard with shed and much 
more: DONT MISS THIS 
ONEI $24,500. (708)578- 
9017. 

55-1 0-1 07/Q 
MARSHFIELD- 
14'X70'-2 bedrooms, 1 
bath, furnished, Shady 
Nook In Brighton. 
(414)878-3088. 

55-7-43 
MUST SELL-QUICK, 
2 bedroom, with expando, 
all appliances and central 
air. Beach Park Schools. 
$8,500 or best offor. 
(708)249-8124. 
55-7-1 1/G 



^R 



Apuricn*:nlB 
For Rent 



^ 



Aparlmcnlft 



9l 




FOR RENT 

2 bedroom 

Mobile Home 

$475.00/Mo. 

-f Security 

No Pets 

(414) 248-3831 



FIVE OAKS APTS- 
Round Lake Park, one 
bedroom. deluxe 
apartment, quiet, clean 
appliances and window 
treatment included, 
cable, laundry, security. 
No petsI Ideal for 1 or 2 
adults. 1 year lease. 
$500. Tenant pays 
electric and security 
deposit. Available 
immediately. (708)623- 
6017. 

ANTIOCH CLEAN- 
efftciency apartment, 
near lake. Ideal for one 
$335 plus security 
deposit, includes utilities. 
References, no pels! 
(708)395-2172. 
TENANT SEEKING- 
someone to lake over 
spacious two bedroom, 1- 
1/2 bath apartment. Great 
location in Gurnee area. 
Clean, plenty of storage, 
pool and tennis courts, 
will pay 1/2 deposit.. 
$615.ASTEALICallEric 
at (708)263-7351. 
VICTORIAN 
APARTMENT-ln 
Grayslake 2 bedroom, 
kitchen, large dining room, 
fenced yard, laundry 
available. Close to train. 
(708)223-4581. 



FOX LAKE ONE AND 

two bedrooms condos, 
unfurnished, $450-$575 
per month, plus security.. 
Call Management 
Specialists. (708)587- 
5250. 

ORCHARD 

APARTHENTS-3-1/2 
miles west of College of 
Lake County on 
Washington Street, 2 
bedroom, balcony, heat, 
water, gas included, no 
pels, no waterbeds. $535 
a month. (708)328-€674. 
LAKE VILLA-2 

bedroom apartment, large 
eat-in kitchen, heat 
included, $575. Fox 
Towers, (708)265-1740. 

inriTltftiitiiliMiii'^-^f-^'" 



VACATION 

VILLAGE-Partially 
furnished, one bedroom, 
•iBlerences, security, and 
lease. No pets, $475 a 
month. (815)385-1268 
after 6 p.m. 

56-7-33 

WAUKEGAN- 

elliciency apartment, 
$400, (708)395-8357. 

56-TF-144 
ATTENTION HORSE 
Lovers- apartment, 2 
bedroom, second floor, 
$550 a month plus 1/2 
utilities. Including one 
box stall. Near 
Richmond, Illinois. 
References. (815)678- 
4226. 



ApurtiTientB 
For Rent 



LARGE 2 BEDROOM- 
apartment in Spring 
Grove, older, but nice, 
$440 a month, plus 
security and utilities. 
(708)587-0248. 

NEAR BASE-2 

bedroom, partly 
furnished, heated, off 
street parking, cable 
ready, military clause 
accepted. $455 plus 
security. (708)473-2616. 
NEW ONE BED- 
ROOM-apartment with 
new appliances In Round 
Lake Beach. $435 a 
month plus utilities. No 
pets. Available 
immediately. (708)546- 
2060. 



Ap 



Mobile 
Ilomce 




Rainbow 
Lake Manor 

New 8i Used Homes 
For Sale 

HOURS: 

Monday - Friday 

9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Saturday 
8 a.m. - 12 Noon 

Evenings & Sundays 
By Appointment 

(414) 857-2891 



E^verywhere you look you'll 
see our aualitv construction | 



I R~3iOikvtntulMien StavUnl 

AJUfttonil hiulilion AttiUblt. 

f Engkttfm) (tool Tnast*. 

ITetirOSBShetUilng. 



OoelKklgeVinlHaOon. 

PolttStMiFtKit. 



ilnfmfVnWSidng 



You CAIV Buy A Home lu 1992! 

Pioneer Estates is a fine community of single 

family manufactured homes. 

• Low down payment 

•Manageable monthly payments 

• Financing available with no points or closing costs 

/^^ . M/2 miles South ol Lake 

^PJOilCCTg. Geneva on Hwy H 

..TATi. (414) 24d-3831 



LiUOmOOD 

VILLAGE 
APARTillEIII^ 

1302 Wilmot 

Avenue 
Twin Lakes, WI 

Brand new 
apartment complex 

2 bedrooms, 
appliances and mini 

blinds included. 

Garages available. 

No pets. 

Rents starting 

at 

$515.00 

414-877-4129 

to view or 

414-697-9616 

for more 

information 

llllllllllllllillliltlllllllllllllll 







CbmScftkgaLodu. 



TtrtiViporBmritt 



See us at our booth at the 

1992 Lake County Home Show 

February 22 & 23 

Trinity College • 1-294 & Rte. 22 



Bring this ad for *I*"* off adult adnnission 



Kloft% . 

Welcome Home. 







A4 BCXt C'*4 1*«AM r 



COUNTY I^INE: 

BUILrDBRS 

216 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



TRIPLE "A" 

BUn^DBRS 

34390 Rt. 45 

Lake Villa, IL 

708-223-7900 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



976-8500 

30 YMir Dally Rat* Chart 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market InformatioD Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 

MORTGAGE HOTLINE FOR DAILY MORTGAGE NEWS, UPDATES AND TODAY'S MOST COMPETITIVE RATES pk/i^, 



976-8500 





2e-Aua 


27.Aua 


20-Aua 


30-Aug 


3O-AU0 


tOT 
























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IB Y^arln f r— t Rate* 

I 1 tavfjutnjo D 



1 a V»ar Ptnl B 7 Yt B«ltoon| 



10 

9.75 

0.5 

o 

'B.7& 
8.5 



30YrJun*)0 O aaymmrftn^d ■ ao'TrnmrFHA 




■IB Yr Jumbo 
V*ar Fbad 



2»-*"0 ■ ao-Aug 
Intaraat rataa baaad on tttraa po4nta 



7 Vf Oalloan . 



Ftbull 
JFtftli 



ECONOMIC EVENTS 

13 and 26-vrt«k Treasory BIB Aodioos 



L 



FebL li , H(j(i5lft^Mwi*bimy/Flnt Time lHnnMi1wy«|<(J(iA*IC> 



RATI TYPE PTSffEfia DOWN IXtfK CAPS RATE TYPE PTBffEEB DOWN LOCK CAPfl 



RATE TYPE PTS^FEES DOWH LOCK CAPS 



RATE TYPE PTSnHEES DOWN LOCK CAPS 



Advantage Bank 

MT8 MyrRx aOK 

• MyrFU W2M 

U lyrARM tAH 



708-362-9300 

B% Wdiy* 
S% Mit^a 
10% NnrC«naliuci«n 



commamt: Conatnic IMH •padiMata - tot kMna an«. 

A 1113 8. Mltwauka«Ava„Ub«rt/vlla 60048 



American FrontIer» Mortgage 706-fl62.88a7 

I 20yrRx fi»*S 10% fiOd^ra 

1A isyrm sa*s io% ud^r* 
7.C25 lOyrm «»» 10% SOday« 

cormMtita: Cmttnie. loan spadaNsta - tot kw 

m. 2fi50 W.QoHBd. 1201 Ro(lf>0 Meadows eOOOe 



Anrarlcan Home Finance 815-385-1040 

• MyrRx 0070 9% Wdayi 

0.21 SyrB<0oofH tf270 10% Wdqra 45AS 
ure 7yrBal)oon* W270 10% Uda^ *7/» 
commwit a ; Wiuunda ofriea. Apt. Bldga., 2nd Hortotflaa, FHA/VA. 
6S1 W. T«fra Gotta Sta #1 lO^Cryatal Uks 60014 



706-291-6580 

6% Md^a 
5% Mdiya 
10% Wd^r* 'JtmlM 



Block & Co. 

•^ Myrm V320+ S% 

f MyrRi 0^20+ 5% 

U ISyrRi 0^20^ B% 

uj i M iia f i U :Caa for 3nd ntortgagaa. 
AA 6Mait(a1Squ«nCtUkaForaa60045 



708-295-5554 

•O^daya 
M^daqra 
«Oi-daif« 



Capitol Federated 

0.25 Myrm 3n00 

•.•75 Myrm WMO 

7.«7S ISyrRx X7Saoo 



commanta: RoMng Maadowa: 70S-3>»4tOHE. 
17E.CiyatalLakaRd.Cry«U1U»(a 60014 



815-477-4999 

10% fOdaya 
10% (Odaya 
tO% tOdaya 



Fox Valley Mortgage 

•••79 MyrFU OaiS 

•.2$ WyrRx V2IS 

i.25 Myrnx4- OQtS 



1-800-339-9868 
10% iOdayt 
10% COdaya 
10% (Odaya Wumbo 



cofnmanta: 2nd inotloagaa avaiabla. Wa malca houaa calla. 
651 W. Tana Cotta «230 Crystal Laka 60014 



Chief Financial 708-304-0470 

•.•25 ISyrFbl 0015 10% COdaya 

• WyrRx 00*5 10% •Odaya 

•.25 MyrRx+ OOSS 10% tOdaya 4Juik« 

commanta: HO JtMC FEES. ICHCAOOLAND LOCATIONS. 
A 200 N. ^4o(thweal Highway Banlnston 6X10 



Countrywide Funding 

•.39 MyrRx IXtWSa 

4.25 1 yr ARW I.ITSOBS 

7.25 7yrBaaoon* 3/215 



708-816-1377 
S% Mdaya 
10% Mdaya 

10% Mdaya *7/» 



•7/2S 



Associated Financial 

•J7B MyrRx a?*5 

•ITS ISyrRx V2«S 
•L2S MyrRx* 0095 
eoninanta: Opan Saturdaya %-X2. 

m SSSSteoMaBM. «a.300. Northbrook 60062 



conwnanta; Cutout nMilHiMn-appiy dncty irtM rmg. twikir. 
AA 1023 NMIwaukaaAva.,Lfcertyv1Ha 60043 



GMAC Mortgage 

4.75 lyrAnu 2.7Sat« 

5.78 lyrARK*^ 2.7Ent5 
7.75 SflyrARU* 3/295 



708-680-5090 

10% Mdaya 

10% Mdaya -kluntw 

10% Mdaya -hhtintn 



co mmanta; 3l7-'aMAC, Sctwumburg ofTloa. 
A 176 E. Hawtborna •22S Vamon HIb 60061 



Nortti Shore Mortgage 

7.5 SyrRX'+t 2.5/295 

■.625 aOyrRX* 3096 

7.75 7yTRX't 2.5n*5 



708-295-8160 

20% Mdaya tSOSa-itiV 
20% Mdaya 'Jwiite 
20% Mdaya Simi:^ 



commanta: Evanaton 700-475-1300, Wlnnata 70«44ft-7472 

S60 Oahwood. Uke Foreal 60045 



JM Mortgage Services 

7.025 SyrSaNoom- 2JS/2f5 
• lOyrRx 3L375/2t5 

0.375 20yTRl 2.«2S/2t5 



708-291-7870 

10% 46daya 44/25 
10% 45daya 
10% 45daya 



comnwnta: Aima to 1 mH. 24 Iv anaw. rnach. 2nd tntaaa. anraN. 
&3340DundaaRd. ^4orihbrook 60062 



Lake Cook Mortgage 

•J75 30yrRx XSOftS 

■ ISyrRx 2.»3»5 

7.5 7yrBaRocn* 2^/2*5 



708-441-5121 

10% Mdaya 
10% Mdaya 
10% Mdaya 



commanta: 0-po(nt programa. Good Jumlw rataa. 

AG60FrontagaRd.Sta272 Northllald 60003 



TCF Mortgage 

•JS SOyrFlx Z«2S/2M 5% 

• SOyrFHA tJUixa 3% 

7.35 Syr Balloon l.tTSAM 10% 
commanta: AflM'a eood up to 500,0001 

830 Wa«t End Cl., Varnon Hilb 60061 



708-367-0570 

Mdaya 
Mdaya 
Mdaya 



United Mortgage Service 708-480^)101 

•.25 SOyrRx 3«» 10% Mdaya 

•.35 tSyrRx* ilfMS 10% Mdaya *Jisitf>o 
• 7yT Balloon* ,5«ft5 10% Mdaya +7ft3 

cowMntt: No doc, con te^ ]i«nto*, ImMananl laeni and and Mlgaa i 
A A 3000 Oundoa Fid. 1308 Norlhbfook 60062 



Wonderilc Richmond Bank 708-587-4710 

%A1^ SOyrRx 3^75 5% Mdaya 

7.75 ISyrFIx 3/275 5% Mdaya 

7.5 7 yr Balloons 3«75 1B% Mdaya +7/23 

commanta: pta. avatUJjIa. Wlae. propatty riao av^Wila. 
AA 10010 Main St. Richmond 60071 



LENDERS CALL BECKY HALL (708> 834-7555 



40 Lokokind Newspapers 



Friday, February 14,1992 



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». 

s 

s.. 

2 

'ty' 
Ff 
lo 
;e 

IS 

I. 

-■•-♦ 

;)••■ 

th 

nd 
a 
vlo 
le 
16- 







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CAPS 



5-8160 



i|4l-7472 



167-0570 



'• 
'■ 
m 



480^)101 

ys *Junibo 
ys -t-r/U 

iMiOMmilibt*. 



587-4710 

lyi 

■ya -^7/23 



8) 834-7555 



ApartmcntB 




PAY 'NO REMT 
(your istrrwnth) 
SaOODEPOSfT 

on 

Ono Bedroom 

•Spadous 

•Private Baloonlea 

•FREE Heal 

•S^iort Torm Leases avail. 

lUKEVIEWAPARTUENTS 

708/587-9277 

•new resident, 1 yr. lease 



DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

Spacious 1 & 2 bedroom 
apartments. Wall lo wall 
carpel. Appliances 
Included, ample closet 
space. Ffoe gas heat & 
cooking. Scenic, quiet 
country selling leatures 
tennis & basketball courts, 
a tot lot, laundry rooms. 
Sorry, no pets. 

Call Mon:-Fri. 
9 a.m. -6 p.m. 
(708) 356-2002 

Equsi Housing Opportunit/ 



LAKESIDE 
LUXURY 

APARTMENTS! 

•Microwave ovens 

•Washers & dryei^ 

•Vaulted ceilings 

•Patios or balconies 

•Dishwashers 
•Convenient location- 

(708) 356-0800 

»705 Water's Edge Dr.' 

Lake Vilta. IL 

^On Route 132 {Grand Aw.) Ju«, 

easi of Route 83 al the Boutti 

stde cH Deep Uke 



^ 



iranaptdty 
Uanigwwit 



^)AferterBEc^ 



j<^ 



Ingleside 

Cozy, two-bed rootn 

home was remodeled 

two years ago 

including new 

furnace, hot water 

heater, electrical, new 

bath, carpet and paint 

throughout. The 

home also features 

wood-burning 

fireplace and nice 

yard. Rent is *580 + 

one month deposit. 

Rent with option to 

buy is possible. The 

home is available 

March 1. Call Ralph 

at (708) 546-5809 or 

(708) 390-8050 x667. 



Apta./llomcH 
To Share 




\\m 



THREE YEAR OLD- 

home to share, female 
preferred. Available 
Immediately. 20 minutes 
from base. Private 
balhroom, $325. With 
option to buy. No utilities. 
(708)356-0333. 

5B-7-44 /G 

ItoomB 
For Rent 




I 



, Propcrl 

Sule 



FULL CONCESSION- 

business including 15 foot 
food cooking trailer, walk 
In cooler trailer, 1986 
Cargo van, deep fryer, 
oven, steam table, tables, 
various other equipment. 
Items etc. (815)344-4294. 
60-7-147 

INGLESIDE 

Weil located 5,000 sq. ft. 

Garage- 2 levels with 

I overhead doors to Parking I 

areas. Equipment 

negotiable. Priced to sell 

$189,900 

ryfiCHAEL Lescher 

"Your Unk To The Chain' 
(708) 395-3000 

i Re/Max Advantage! 



Bus. I'ropcrt 
For Rcnl 



9 



^ 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 
FIND IT. 



CLASSIFIED 



4000 SQ. FT. 
INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 
5 over hang doors, large 

spacious olfice. 

Available immediately. 

Days {708) 223-1893 

Days & Eves. (70B) 566-5564 



•REPAIR BAYS* 

Auto/Truck 

Magnificent Exposure 

550 N.Green Bay Rd. 

Just South of Grand Ave. 

Gumee/Waukegan 

(708) 249-2323 



SUCCESSFUL 
BUSINESS 

Can be yours in this 
perfect location. 2800 sq. 
ft. building has unlimited 

possibilities and high 
traflic exposure. Possible 
low 10% down financing. 

Call George or Mike. 

(708) 298-9555 

Win L. Kunkel & Co. 



INDUSTRIAL 
SPACE 



Fountain Head 
Corporate Center 
on Rt. 12 m RicmoKD 

Superior 2,400, 4,800 

square foot unit 

$945.00/S1 ,890.00 Gross! 

Dock 17ft /1 8fl Ceilings, 

A/0 Otiica 

LAND BIAKAGEBIENT 
(SXS) 678-4771 



Lois/Acrfiage 
Farmg 

BUtLDABLE LAKE- 

FRONT-loton chain. Best 
offer, owner. (708)395- 
2655. 

63-7-74 
LOOKING FOR A- 
lot? You must see the 
distinctive 1 acre site at 
Sundial Farms ideally 
located near Spring 
Grove adjacent to The 
Chain O'Lakes State 
Park. Gently rolling land 
v/ilh soils ideal for building 
condition's starting at 
$29,900. Excellent school 
systems. Attractive 
financing being offered. 
For Infonnation call owner, 
(815)678-4228. 
63-7-114 




llcBorl/Vuc. 
Tl«inlalfl 



IS 



; 



FLORIDA FREE 

BOOKLET-How lo buy 
your retirement home in 
Florida. Free Contra! 
Florida map, and more. 
Phone toll free. Leesburg, 
Florida. 1(800)533-5940. 
64-00-1 



Lotb/Acreuge 
Farme 



9 



Oul Of Area 
Propttrty 




Bub. Properl 
For Rcnl 



w 



2,000*4,000 SQ.FT.- 

iight industrial space, 
located in Grayslake, 
Immediate occupancy, 
230 volt 3 phase electric, 
small office, 11x14 
overhead door. (708)223- 
8877 or (708)223-7932. 

61-7-113 
ANTIOCH OFFICE- 
Space, newly remodeled 
small and large offices 
from $195 a month, in- 
cluding utilities, 
(708)395-4895. 
61-7-39 

i DOWNTOWN FOxTaKEJ 

For sale or lease. 1,100 

sq. ft, storelront wriih 

J parking in rear. Owner will 

1 lease for $785. Mo., or sell | 

for $89,900 possibly on 

contract 

MICHAEL LESCHER 

"Your Unk To The Chain' 

(708) 395-3000 

i Re/Max Advantage j 



ONE acre VACANT- 
Lake lot, Fish Creek 
Subdivision 26550 W. 
Slockholm Dr., Ingleside. 
Size 130x300. Exclusive 
Subdivision, Western 
Lake County, firm price, 
$90,000. No brokers. 
(708)223-5383. 

63-8-1 1 1 
TWO VACANT LOTS- 
Flsh Creek Subdivision. 
One acre lots, Stanton 
Drive off h/lolidor Rd., 
Ingleside. Firm price, 
$60,000 each, No 
brokers, (708)223-5383. 

63-8-112 
BEAUTIFUL 
BUILDABLE-wooded 
1/2 acre lot with creek, 
directly across from boat 
dock area on Petite Lake 
(Lake Villa), $42,000, 
(708)356-9230. 

63-8-46 



N.Y. ARMONK 

'91 Construction. UHra mod 
conlemp, 5700sf, 5-1/2 mrbl bihs, 
granite ftrs, super mod kit. 4SO0sf 
wrap around dock & much rrare. 
All serious oKors considered. Roal 
estato appraisal over SI ,000.000. 
Ask 5975,000 Days 21 a/325-6990, 

eves^vk^ds 914/234-0228, 



MICHIGAN THUMB- 

40 ac. oasis, 7 ml. Irom Lake 

Huron- SECLUDED Healing 

energies In this goodeslc dome are 

unique. Stocked pond, naiura trails, 

oul tjfcJQ. 2650 sq. ft. modliaiion loll 

& ceramic trat lub . $S50K. 

IDEAL RETREAT 

313-327-6415 



LEWISTOWN, MONTANA 

Pines, Aspens. Open meadows, 

& 8 ac lake at baso o1 the Big 

Snowy Mins. 1600 deeded 

acres Jusi 30 min lo airstrip, 

golling, a Blue Rlbtion Stream. 

$660,000 cash needed w/ln 30 

days. Phillips Realty 406-533- 
5271 or Fax 406-538-7477. 



LENDER 



Ail real estate advertising in this newspaper 
is subject to the Fair Housing Act of 1968 
which makes it illegal to advertise "any 
preference, limitation or discrimination based 
on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial 
status or national origin, or an intention to 
make any such prelerence, limitation or 
discrimination. 




GET OUT OF TOIVN... 

And enjoy the wide open spaces and larger size places you'll find 
outside of the city. Check these for the most comprehensive 
listings of the best and brightest homes in the Lakeland area. 



FOX LAKE LAKE- 

fronl sleeping room with 
house privitegos include 
kitchen, washer and 
dryer, TV, summer pier, 
dependable individuals 
only need apply. $350 a 
month includes utilities 
except phone. Security 
deposit, references and 
credit chock required. Call 
Sue after 7 p.m. (708)740- 
3t72 for appointment 
59-7-111 



Buyers* Seminar 

FREE -FREE 

IVIarch 2, 1992 

Hampton Inn-GurneB 

Call for reservations 

Callahan Blandlngs 

Schaper Inc. Realtors- 

Gurnee office 
70B-263-0660 



I 



Waukegan 

Classic 3 bdrm., 2 
story, full basement, 
garage, large dining 
room. $88,000 
Callahan Blandlngs 
Schaper Inc. Realtors- 
Gurnee office 

708-263-0660 



Gurnee 

Townhouse, 2 car gar., 
full bsmt., expanded 
Fairfax model $145,900 

Callahan Blandlngs 
Schaper Inc. Realtors 
Gurnee office 

708-263-0660 



TOWNHOME FOR REMT 

NORTH U^KE BLUFF AREA 
Amenities include pool, 
tennis, clubhouse and 
more! Lovely 1 bdrm. 
loft-rent for '585 or buy 
for only '37,900. Ask for 
Brenda Lawler. 

Cornerstone Realty 
(708) 872-8998 



GURNEE 

2-story on 
wooded acre! 

BeaulilJ 3*- bdrm/3 iDCrth 
homo; locludod, woodod 
QCTQ. FeotufG! til flf- forri. rm; 
fomanllc (Iroptaco, 1st dr. 
lOLTdry & so much morel Cdl 
EIrenda Lowtor for doldls. 

Cornerstone Realty 
^708) 872-8998 



THINKING OF 

SELLING? 

Call me, Carolyn BaranowskJ, 

over 10 years experience in 

Lake County, 

"The care bear of Real 

Estate' 
(70S) 356-5000 

ALL STAR REAL ESTATE 
SERVICES, INC. 



J 



Look For Your Dream 

Home Here In 
Lakeland Classifieds 



uary 14, 1992 



Frlday.February 14. 1992 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
type of Home 
n One Story 



Size of home 
G 1000 & less 
n 2001 to 2500 



n Two Story 

D 1001 to 1500 
D 2501 to 3500 



D Split Level 

n 1501 to 2000 
D 3500 & up 



n Basement 



Budget for home (land excluded) S_ 



. Lot location 
n standard Lot 

Exterior style 

n Contemporary 
D English Tudor 

Exterior material 

D Brick D Stone 



n Acreage 



D Country 
D Colonial 



a Wood 



Garage 
Number of cars 



D Shop 



□ Spanish 
n Victorian 



D Stucco 



n Storaga 



a other . 

D Ranch 
D Other. 



n other 



n RV Parlting 



LIVING AREAS 

In addition to kitchen and living area I would like the following rooms in my home: 

n Formal Entry D Formal Dining D Recreation D Family Room 

n Media Room D Exercise D Office - D Den 

n Guest Suite D Library D Utility D Nursery 

fvlumber of Bedrooms Number of Baths 

Other rooms — 



KITCHEN FEATURES 

Style and Shape 

G Country D U-shaped D WalkThru 

Amenities (in addition lo standard appliances) 

rj Breakfast nook D Pantry D Eating Bar 

n Appliance Center G Island D Double Oven 

D Garden Window G Freezer □ Grill 

MASTER SUITE FEATURES 

G Isolated Irom OR D Adjacent to other bedrms □ Patio 
Q Private bath with the following leatures: 
G Tub/Shower comb. G Bathtub G Shower 

G Two wash basins G Skylight D Bidet □ Spa 



D Other. 



MAIN BATH FEATURES 

G Tub/Shower comb. D Bathtub 
G Two wash basins G Skylight 



D Shower 
G Bidet 



Q Oversized Tub 
D other 



1992 DREflM HOME SURVEY 



If home designers would just ask me, you may have thought, I could 
tell them what people really want in a home. 

Well, here's your chance. Landmark Designs, in partnership with 
Lakeland Newspapers is asking you to tell us exactly which features 
and amenities you would include in your Dream Home. Now in our 15th 
year of designing homes and writing a home design column, we've 
learned that our readers can always teach us a thing or two. Or more. 

Whether you plan to build a home or not, filling out the form can help 
clarify your preferences. And it's an opportunity to let your imagination 
soar, for a change. To make it easy and fun, we've provided a survey 
form that includes the same questions architects, designers and real 
estate agents ask to determine clients' wants and needs. 

We also encourage readers to attach letters, sketches or any 
comments that come to mind. We love reading what you send in— the 
more detailed, the better. 

Once the nationwide results of this survey are tallied, Landmark will 
design a national Dream House. In addition, since area preferences 
vary widely, we promise to custom design a home to meet the exact 
specifications preferred by readers of each newspaper we serve. For 
newspapers with high response, we will come up with small, medium 
and large designs. 

Floorplans and artist's renderings of the Dream Homes will appear on 
these pages in the spring. The home builders' trade pays close 
attention to such surveys, so this Is a rare chance to let them know 
what you think. 

Following publication of these plans, Landmark will provide a free set 
of working drawings to the first individual who is willing to build one of 
the Dream Homes and open it to public display for a limited time. 

Mail forms to Landmark Designs, Inc., Dept. 92, P.O. Box 2307, 
Eugene, OR 97402. To receive a personal copy of the National Dream 
Home Survey results, include $4 to cover the cost of postage and 
printing. Be sure to include your name and mailing address, and 
whatever you do, don't give up on your dreamsl 



n Recycling Center 
a Trash Compactor 
G nihar 

G Sitting Room 

D Oversized Tub 
G Other . 



SPECIAL REQUESTS 

D Fireplace ' D Woodslove 

D Computer Center G DecWPatio 

G Vaulted Ceilings G Skylights 

t would conserve energy by taking advantage of; 

G Minimized Windows G Passive solar G Active solar 



C Spa 
G Atrium 
n Other _ 



G Indoor Swim Pool 
Q Security System 



G Extra insulation 



DEMOGRAPHICS 

Number in Household Age Marital Status 

Do you own a home? G Yes G No Are you going to build a home? Yes Q No 



Mail completed survey to: 



LANDMARK DESIGNS, INC. 
Department 92 
P. O. Box 2307 
Eugene, OR 97402 



Lakeland Nowtpapori 41 



I- 



:■<«" ,J I vv^inost ,\cciil 



II. 




Oui or Area 
Properly 



WA. HOOD CANAL 

CORP/INDIV. RETREAT 

395' Low Sank Wirt ind'ding 

lidolands. Approx. 8 hoavily 

woodod acres, total prvcy. 2500 

sq. it Homo, guosl , shop. Facas 

Olympics, cHy walof & eloctridly. 

Assumable nxjrtgago. 5950,000. 

206-2Q 1-7422 days 

206-638-2458 cws/wksnds 



CAPE COD 
SEASIDE VDiliAGE 

Ocean don; privato warm watar beadv 

2 S 3 bdrm. cottgftt. Paibct to( tamly 

localm. DEWJB SEASHORES. P.O. 

Box 656M. Cenbfvlla, MA 02632 

l-50a-398-SSI2. 



EVERGREEN, CO 

BEAUTIFUL 2 soy eontonpofary mti 

htniBnosledcnl.Twoodadac. 40m'rn 

hom downtown, Q oa I tm appo« 1.000 

sq. ft , spi. s&xty, sunrm oo only a lew o( 

Dm eitras (or lanily A entwlaining, 4 Irpis, 

1 in Mactor tula. * hdim. 4 ) /2 bihs. a 

(jourmotWL«aoOsq It $135,000 makes 

this an 6«c- value. By oppl. (303) 670- 

6112 « (303) 639-4789 Days 




WISCONSIN 

Beautiful SpaclouB Estate 

Near Rhinctandor, Wl 

Sandy beach w/400 ft-. 

frontage. Home has indoor 

swimming pool, hot lub & spa 

rm. Stunning decor 

throughout. Within 12 mi of 

airport on 1-1/2 ac. $895K. 

Call Today! An absolute must 

see home. 

Tomahawk Realty 

1-800-732-9597 



RAGGED ISLAND 

Cambridge, Maryland 

UNIQUE 140 acre private 

island, paved air strip, 

controlled access causeway, 

10.000 sq. It. home, 
caretakers home, 190 fl. pier, 
plus 60 acre gunning island. 

Financing available. S5.3 

million. Contact Keith Nitsen 

at (302) 656-6686. 

Krapfcandoil Co. 



MONTANA 

Southwestern Monlana-Big Sky 

Countty in Anaconda. Beautiful 

investment property consisting 

o1 80 rental units with waiting list 

for occupancy. Walking distance 

to newly proposed 

JatA Nicklaus golf course. 

Financial inlormation available 

to qualified buyer. 

Asking Pri(» $1,600,000. 

ERA Butte Realty 

1-800-336-5672. 

Ask for Doris or Nancy. 





Itccrealional 
Vehicles 



MOTORHOME 1977- 
Itasca Class A, 
generator, roof, air, 
sleeps, 7, 76.000 miles, 
$6,500.(708)872-1880. 
70-7-87 



^K 



Snowmobile 

ATVe 

SNOWMOBILE 1986- 

Phazer, excolleiit 
conidUion, 1,300 miles, 
hot grips, cover, $1,950. 
(708)355-7929. 
GREAT DEALl-1991 
Arctic cat Prowler Special 
snowmobile, brand new. 
no miles, one year 
warranty, 2 up-seats and 
many new accessories, 
$5,000 or best offer. Must 
selll Please calll 
(708)548-1224. 
ATV-19S6 LT-230- 
Quad Sport, $1,000 or 
best offer. (708)497-3658 
Ask for D.J. 

SNOWMOBILE 1986- 
Indy 600 Limited Edition, 
597cc, bored 20 over, 
totally rebuilt, very fast, 
100 mph plus, excellent 
condition, with cover. 
$3,800 or best offer. 
(708)223-5170. leave 
message. 

1979 SCORPION- 
1,100 miles, full cover, 
new plugs, new skaggs, 
new belt. $450. (708)587- 
1648. 

WESTERN SNOW- 
Plow blade and A-frame, 
7-1/2', $300 or best offer. 
Arctic Cat snowmobile, 
Cfieetah 5000, $900 or 
best offer. (708)395- 
7625. 



1^^ 



BouiK/iMolor 

ICl(!. 

RANGER BASS 

BOAT-18', 1988 373V 150 

Evinrude EXP. (414)694- 

6620 after4 p.m. $12,000 

or best offer. 

1961 16' THOM- 

PSON-custom runabout, 

75hp, second owner. 

Sacrifice $1,600. Runs 

great. With trailer. 

(708)395-8875. 

1977 TAHITI JET 

boat, 455 Oldsmobile 

engine. (708)816-6272 

days or (708)546-2068 

evenings. 

Travel/ 
Vacation 




Bahama 
Cruise 

5 days • 4 nights 
Over bought. Corp 

Rates to Public. 

Limited Tickets. 

$239/Couple 

(407)331-7818 

X363, MS99 






Sporle 
Equipment 



w 




POOL TABLE-8- 

1/2x4-1/2, excellent 
condition, Includes all 
access. Paid $4,800, 
selling for $2,300. 
Exercise bicycle, $95. 
(708)395-9912. 




SporlH 
K(itih)nnMil 

HEY SKI BUMS- 
Women's Solomon Ski- 
boots, SX61, Size 9, 
wfiite boot, 2 years old. 
$75 or best offer. Leave 
message, (815)363-0542, 
after 5 p.m. 

NISHIKI MOUNTAIN- 
bike,' excellent condition, 
hardly ridden, quality 
components including 
locks, $250. (708)526- 
6886. 

75-7-50 




Care 
For Sale 



1977 CADILLAC- 

Seville, all power, 88,000 
miles, clean in and out, 
runs good, doesn't burn 
oil, 4 door, frost orange in 
and out, leather 
upholstery, $3,700. 
(708)587-7082. 
80-7-89 
19B3 SUBARU-GL, 2 
door, 1 owner, 68,000 
miles, 5 speed, loaded. 
$1,500 or best. (708)587- 
8079 after 5 p.m. 

1979 OLDSIVIOBILE. 
Delta 88 Royale, auto, 8 
cylinder, 350 cer. inch 
engine, 4 door, trailer 
hitch, good runner. 
125.000 miles. $350. 
(708)223-1873. 

80-TF-143 
1983 AUDI 5000-4 
door, air, power windows, 
power door locks, 
sunroof, leather interior. 
$3,000 or best offer. 
(708)740-3242 evenings. 
80-7-69 

1983 CHEVY- 

Camaro, blue, 5 speed, 
am/fm cassette, new 
brakes, $2,700 FIRI^, 
newly painted, great 
condition. (708)395-2662. 

80-7-121 
CHRYSLER 1980- 
newport 6 cylinder, 4 door, 
tan, auto, power brakes, 
power steering, air 
conditioning, excellent 
body. $2,000 or best 
offer. (312)202-8526. 

SO-7-127 
PERFECT 1989- 
Olds Delta 88 Royale 
Brougham FES, loaded, 
17,000 miles, $11,500. 
(708)395-4063. 
80-7-73 
1975 RANCHERO- 
needs minor work, runs 
excellent. $595. 
(708)356-0333. 

80-7-70/G 
1981 TOYOTA-Celica 
for parts. $100. (708)587- 
7864. 

80-7-66 
HONDA 1986- 

Prelude, dark gray, 
automatic, 50K miles, 
am/fm cassette, air 
conditioning, sunroof, 
excellent condition, 
$6,300. (708)937-9886 
days or (708)816-7099 
evenings. 

80-8-65 




Care 
For Sale 



Cars 
For Sale 



1977 FORD LTD-4 

door, runs good, $400. 
(708)587-7232. 

80-7-66 
1990 FORD TEMPO- 
GL, 4 door, fully loaded, 
air conditioner, auto 
transmission, power 
steering, power windows, 
power locks, tilt, cruise, 
luggage rack, stereo, 
tape, excellent condition, 
16,000 miles, $8,000. 
(708)356-7469 ask for 
Ted. 

80-7-67 

1984 CADILLAC- 
EIDorado,- all white, 
60,000 original miles, 
never driven in snow, 
garage kept, immaculate, 
$6,500. (414)694-0285 
after 5 p.m. weekdays. 

80-7-68 
DODGE CORONET- 
"68, 72K miles, very good 
condition, best offer. 
(708)948-5869. 

80-7-69 
BUICK CENTURY- 
Estate Wagon. '86. 
$3,500, (708)540-6049. 

80-8-70 
PONTIAC ENGINE- 
'89 LeIVIans, 1700cc, low 
mileage, also other 
LeMans parts. Left front 
fender for '82 Mustang. 
Small brake lathe drum 
only, $100. (414)654- 
5527 Kenosha. 

80-7-71 
CAIWARO 1978 LOW 
mileage on rebuilt engine, 
$2,000 or best offer. 
(708)872-8362. 

1978 BUICK- 
LeSabre, 301 Ponliac 
engine, rod blown, many 
new parts on engine 
inside and outside good 
condition', $200 or best. 
(708)356-6801 after 6 
p.m. 

1983 FORD MUS- 

TANG-V6. power 
steering, power brakes, 
new parts, runs good, 
body in good shape, new 
tires, $2,000 or best offer. 
(708)362-5159. 
1987 CHRYSLER- 
Fifth Avenue, good 
condition. Gall after 4 
p.m. (708)244-2686. 
80-7-63 

1985 BLAZER-38" 
Groundhog tires, 488 
gears, $3,200. (708)623- 
6625 or (708)223-4137. 
1977 T-BIRD GOOD- 
engine, brakes, and 
transmission, $795 or 
offer. Call NOW, 
(708)356-0333. 

1985 FORD MUST- 
ANG-white, four cylinder, 
good condition, good, 
mpg. $1,395. (708)356- 
0333. 

STOCK CAR- 

Rolling chassis, lots of 
extra parts, loo many to 
list $1,200 or best offer. 
(414)656-1017, 
80-7-128 



Where To Worship 



1984 CHRYSLER- 

New Yorker, full power, 
electric windows and door 
locks, air. Rebuilt engine, 
$2,000. (708)587-6515. 
80-7-90 

1989 VOLKSWAGEN- 
Jetla GLt, 16V, Wolfsberg 
Limited edition. 72,000 
highway miles, Recaro 
seats, sunroof, and 
loaded with all options, 
excellent condition, 
100,000 miles, 
transferable warranty. 
$7,000 or best offer. 
(708)662-7082 between 6 
and 9 p.m. 

80-8-91 

1986 HONDA- 
Accord LXI, hatchback, 
charcoal grey, automatic, 
excellent condition, 
$5,300. (708)367-8580. 

80-8-92 
1981 CADILLAC- 
Eldorado, 2 door coupe, 
garage kept, beautiful 
body and leather Interior. 
$2,195. (708)223-8023 
after 4 p.m. 

80-8-93 
BLACK 1988- 

Mercury Cougar XR7, 
loaded, 5.0L engine, new 
tires, and brakes, $7,500 
or best offer. (708)566- 
4524. 

80-7-94 

1987 SUBARU-XT 
Coupe, fully loaded, good 
condition, highway miles, 
$6,000 or best offer. 
(708)265-1662. 

80-8-95 
1990 TOYOTA- 

Tercel, 2 door, black, 5 
speed, 4 cylinder, am/fm 
cassette. 26,000 miles, 
asking $6,800. (708)566- 
2597 after 6 p.m. 

80-7-96 

1990 DODGE DYN- 
ASTY-alr condition, 
cruise, stereo, lilt wheel, 
A-1. $6,500 or best offer. 
(414)857-2279. 

80-8-59 
FORD 1990 RANGER- 
XLT, 5 speed, excellent 
condition, air 

conditioning, am/fm 
cassette, $9,000. 
(708)381-2231. 

80-7-60 
1987 CHEVETTE- 
like brand new in and out, 
52K, $2,250. After 6 p.m. 
(708)587-1598. 

80-7-61 

1990 DODGE DAY- 
TONA-5 speed, good 
condition, $7,000 firm. 
(708)395-9156. 
1986 HYUNDAI- 
good transportation. Call 
after 6 p.m. Rich 
(708)263-6668. 
80-7-51 

Answers to 
King Crossword 




ffi 




1983 VW GTI- 

Sunroof, good condition, 
welt maintained, no rust, 
or dents, $2,500. 
(708)526-6886. 

flO-7-53 
1980 TOYOTA- 

Cresida, 6 cylinder, 4 
door, auto with overdrive, 
solid, little rust, $500. 
Runs great. (708)740- 
0717. 

80-7-108 
1977 CADILLAC 
Eldorado. 2 door, new 
exhaust, new brakes, 
recent tune-up, needs 
paint. $450 or best offer. 
(815)363-1875. 

80-7-54 
1979 CHEVY TWO- 
door, straight 6 cylinder 
engine, automatic and 
power, $550 or best offer, 
(815)363-1875. 

80-7-55 
1975 OLDS FOUR- 
door, runs like new, - 
everything works, $450 or 
best offer. (815)363- 
1875. 

80-7-56 
1987 FORD TAURUS- 
LX, 4 door, 46,000 miles, 
loaded, keyless entry, 
asking $6,200. (708)382- 
3760. 

80-8-57 
1990 CADILLAC- 
Seville Special edition, 
loaded, 11,000 miles, 
$39,900 new price, 
sacrifice $24,500 or 
trade. (414)857-2279. 

80-6-58 




Service & 



FIBERGLASS 
TRUCK- top, fits Ford 
Ranger, gloss, black, 
smoked windows, tailgate 
protector and mounting 
hardware, used one week. 
Paid $700, Make offer. 
(815)337-0040. 
83-7-122 



Car Loojib/ 
Ineurancc 



M 



1990 BUICK- 

Regal Grand Sport 
Package, all options, 
including power sunroof, 
black t^ook value, 
$13,500. Asking $13,500. 
Mint condition. (708)680- 
7515. 



84-9-130 



Vane 



M 



1983 DODGE CAR- 
GO-Van, 1 ton. 360 V8. 
runs great, excellent work 
van. $1 ,500 or best offer. 
Call Ralph at (708)546- 
5809 or (708)390-8050, 
ext 667. 

85-TF-29 
1979 CHEVY- 

Conversion Van, very 
dependable, high 
mileage, some rust, 
$1,650 or best offer. 
(708)546-0199. 

85-8-97 



Trucks/ 
Trailers 



M 



1979 CHEVY 1/2 TON 

pickup, V8, automatic 
with air, $1,250 or best 
offer. (815)363-1875. 
86-7-76 



Fox Lake 

The Lutheran Church of All Saints, 5800 Stale Pk. 
Rd., Fox Lake, Youth Group will hold a spaghetti dinner 
on Saturday, Feb. 15. The seating times arc 5:30, 6:30, 
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Adults are $5, ages six to 10, $2.50; 
ages five and under arc free. Reservations arc needed and can 
be made by calling (708)587-7727. 

Wildwoad 

, The Wildwood Presbyterian Church, 33428 N. Sears 
Blvd., in Wildwood, worships at 10 a.m. each Sunday. The 
first meeting of MOMS, a fellowship group for mothers of 
young children will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 
20. Call (708)223-0073 for information. 




^ 




Bible Church'} 



T 



Cottiiwmiity 



^isit our 'Hm) Chwrck 9{ome 

Sunday B€or.nimo 

Sunday School 9 AM 
Worship 10 AM 
The Christian's Community 
Pt. 2 "The Third Race" Eph 2:19-22 

Sunday Evening Service 

6 PM - The Role of The Holy Spirit 

23201 W. Grass Lake Rd., Antioch 
(Just East of 83) 



Trucks/ 

Trailers 

78 FORD 3/4 TON- 
P/U TRK, excellent 
condition, auto 

transmission, engine and 
brakes, all good. $795. 
Call today at (708)356- 
0333. 

86-7-89 

1989 F35Q XLT-4 

wheel drive, 4 door, all 
options, 14" chrome 
bumper, 351 F.I.; 4 
speed, heavy duty autc 
CD., great puller, 
mileage, 21,000 miles. 
Now $24,000 sell 
$17,500. (414)857-7105. 

86-7-120 
1988 DODGE RAM- 
50, long bed, red, chrome 
wheels, clean inside and 
out, automatic with 
overdrive, $5,500. 
(708)740-1679. 

86-7-85 

1988 FORD XLT-150, 

47,000 miles, white, 6 
cylinder, beautiful, loaded 
with cap, runs and looks 
great, asking $7,000. 
(708)395-8863. 

86-7-98 
1979 BLAZER-$7G0. 
After 5 p.m. (708)746- 
8003. 

86-7-99 
JEEP '87 CHER- 
OKEE-2 door, loaded, 
very clean, 59K miles, 
includes, 2 year warranty, 
$8,800 or best offer. 
(708)381-8821. After 3 
p.m. 

86-8-74 
•87 GMC S15 4X4- 
Jimmy, clean and well 
maintainedl Loaded and 
sharp. $8,450. (708)395- 
2494 am or (708)395-2484 

pfn 

86-6-75 




Heavy 
Equipment 

JOHN DEERE-1978 

310A, backhoe, runs 
perfect, $7,500. 
(708)293-5902 or 
(708)690-0814. or 

87-7-119 
ELECTRIC HOIST- 
5001b. with 10' lift, 
pushbutton control, 6' 
cord, latch type safety 
hooks, wire rope style, 
brand new, paid, $500 
asking $300 or best offer. 
(708)395-2357. 

87-8-77 
MELROE 600 

Bobcat with manure fork 
and bucket, extra tires, 
$3,400, must sell. 
(708)438-7437. 

87-7-78 



MoloreycIoB 



ffi 



1984 YZ125 ENGINE 
complete rebuild, loo 
much to list. $650 or best. 
(708)746-5146 Curt, after 
2:30 p.m. 

88-7-100 
YAMAHA SRX 1980- 
custom paint and motor, 
studs, excellent 
condition, $1,000 or best 
offer. (414)862-2689. 

88-7-79 
MUST SELL 1985- 
Suzuki 1200 Madura, 
excellent runner, $1 ,600. 
(708)356-6377 after 5 
p.m. 

88-7-132 



Are You of 

REFORMED — CALVINISTIC 

Persuasion? 

You are being sought for 

fellowship with those of 

like faith. 



Please call 362-0999 for 
further information 



m 



'V,'V.I 



42 Lakeland Itowspapers 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



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ECYCLING CErfTER 

ipl We buy aluminum cans, aluminum, copper, brass, 
l/p stainless steel, auto radiators, catalytic converters. 

"" ^"^^ "7""™i 88 S.Centre Dr. 

r (Intersection of m. 120 &m. 134) 

^~ ^ HainesvUle, W^ ^ 

r (768)223-1893J 



B.C. DOG TRUNING, INC. ^ 

"Whem wo train you to Um your dog' g 






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•Conformaflon- y 

Beglnmn A Advanced W 

in 

• Counuflng 



AO our dassas are Kmltod in size 

(or gnutor anentbn and he\p wiih exeitises. 

Can (or Class Schedjia 

.^ (TOT) 866-1860 






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386/33 (64kb cache) $875 
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KEITH 



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• Powof RcxJdIng . sutrp Purrps 

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interior / Exterior Painting 

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•Birthdays • Anniversaries • Birltis 
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Aluminum Cans 
INDUSTBIAL ACCOUNTS WELCOME 

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FOUR PAWS 

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24 1 Jr. Message 



Vf 



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• Training on Macintosh & IBM 

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• 13 technicians to serve you I 

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on Old McIIenry Road I 



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(708) 587-4550 

Special Offer! 
VCR Cleaning 
and inspection $18.95 

FREE pick up and delivery. 

Unit disconnected and reinstalled 

within 20 mile radius. 

Nominal charge after 20 miles, 




^ AZTronixs J 

jjl featuring the BEST in Auto Technology a 

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Mon-Fri 10-6. Sat. 10-5 



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• Over 16 years experience in the construction trades. 
• Providing fiill time service to homeowners and landlords. 

All Work I ^ Electrical VCarpentry 
;i 00% Guaranteed) V Plumbing VPainting 




No Job I V^V^ ^IV^ or Too Small 

Evening Hours Avaiuble (708) 356-3074 



CUSTOI^* 



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SPRING SPECIAL 

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• Also Available • 

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INSURED 

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Antiocii 



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(WaucondaJ 



DECORATING 

Interior & Exterior 

Small Repairs 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rales 

Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Quarantee 

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.^,^ 




Are you lookir^for 
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Offers 



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• Color Analysis • Fashion Tips 
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(815) 344-8133 • (708) 367-1555 

•Gift Ccrtineatcs Available 



Secretary for a 



SERVICES 

Word Processing • PC capabilities 

You're only charged with hours 

worked! In-Home office. 

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CUSTOM 
DECORitTiXG 

• Interior • Exterior 
Homes Corttractors Apartments 
-Painting -Wall Papering 
staining -Wood Finishing 
"Quality Work at Reasonable Rates' 

niKE mrcHELL 

Custom Becorating 

(708) 395-6051 

FREE ESTIMATES INSURED 



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COUPON-' 



ECOWATER" 

STORE 

269 Industrial Dr. 
Wauconda, IL 
(708) 487-1480 

Lake Zurich: Watch for Specif 
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BUYING 



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closod 12-12:30 for lunch 



Receive 2i MORE per pound 

over our current prices on 

aluminum cons 



■ W 

Expires 2-29«9X 



Friday, February 14, 1992 



Lxikekind Newspapers 43 




■Illfp> 



Lakelan44iewspapers 

YOUR 

To Area Business & Services 




To Pla<^ Your 
Ad Here Call 

Lakeland. 

Newspapers 

(708) 223-8161 




HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 




LAWNWORKS 

Trees •Maintenance • Shrubs 

• Sod • Boulder Walts 

•Fall Clean-up 

•Snow Blowing 

NO JOB TOO 

SMALL! 

Reasonable 

DENNIS ADAMS 
(708) 566-3231 




PAINTING SERVICES 



Vy^- Interior & Exterior • Brush, Spray or Roll "^^jj 



^ 



^ 



Dry Wall IRepair • Carpentry (All Types) 
• Specialty Coating (Rag, Sponge, Etc) 
• Wallpaper Removal & Hanging 
• Restoration • Decorating Consultation & Services 

Rainbo^v Painting Services 
C70S) 35^-5445 



V 



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AMAAAZIZING! 

Lose wciglii now and keep il off. 

Tlit,'/hjirf:;fivMicniDidfiii,'> 
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Martina (708) 426-2766 




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• Siding • Soffit • Fascia • Trim 

• Seamless Gutters • Decks • Roofing 

• Windows * Doors • Additions • Garages 

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED 

Ask for John Gebert 

Days (815) 455-3035 • Eves (708) 587-8772 •! -800-439^4036 ^ 



PHIUilPS SERVICES 

Exports In homo Improvement 
and romodoltng. Resldonllal or 
commorcfal. 

Prywdll * lnt<>rior/Ex(erl6r 

Painting • Power Washing 

Homo repairs * Decks 

6ank Financing AvDilabId 

"T FREE ESTIMATES 
\ (708)244-6612 



1 



TIM'S 

CONCRETE 

Additions, Garages, 

Driveways 

Walks 

(708) 395-451 6 



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Kxpcrlliistnllnlinn 

Pnpcr • Fabric • Vinyl 



r>ECORATING 

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WALLPAPERING 

Residential & 
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Leni Baker 
(414)537-2220 

CALL FOR FREE 
ESTIMATE 



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Specializing in Carpentry 
• New 
; ^ Construction 

Remodeling 
^ Free Estimates - 
- Insured 

_ or 

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FLOORS 



u 



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Multi-colored spray 
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H Free estimates • Insured 
5 Graduate ot U.S. School of Paperhanging 



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KITCHENS, BATHS 
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•BRASS 
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PHOHE 
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c 

A 

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•ALUMINUH CANS 

•ALUMINUM 

•BATTERIES 

•LEAD 

32270 N. Hwy. 83 

(Just Soulh or Rt 137 Before 

RR Trsckt Grayilake) 



(708) 948-8075 

MATHIESON 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

For all your 
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•Kitchen cabinets 
-Kohler plumbing 
■Corlan counter tops 
•Wood Floors & 
More 

COMMERCIAL 

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Design, Build or 

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CdlJack 

(708) 948-8075 



Hair af 
th6 Dag 

oS Grayslake 



All Breed Grooming by 

Michelle 

for appointment call 
(708)223-5927 ^ 

^Ask About Valentine Special j 



BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 ,000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north Statellnc R± 

East ofHwy. 45 on County Trunk CJ 

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Bristol, Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Won. - Fri. 8-5. Sat. 8-3 




(Nintendd*) 



ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 



^w»¥><wvwwr « » n w»iw»^w^^^Mww^w^» 



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OPEN: Weekdays III 830 p.m. Saturdays 11-8 pm, Sundays 11-7:30 pm 




DISCOUNT 



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C.W.UNDSCAPECO.INC. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS 
Serving £Mf County Sina 1960 

•Computer Design • Seeding 

• Flagstone Patios ■ Sodding 

• Stone Walls • Planting 

• Texture Gardens • Grading 

(708)623-7334 



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New Service for the 
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Monty*s 



f, Is now oUering on site auto and \ 
/ marine repairs. Starting April 1st. \ 



For details call 



(414) 857-7777 





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PLANNING e DRAFTING 



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TEL: (708) SSpOSy FAX: (708) 356-|747 

Over xo ycfiTs e^^cTtcitca, 
Call to^€$y for nj^paintmcnt. 



J. 

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SHUMAN 

Free Lance 
Photographer 

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(708) 546-7840 




I 




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MAINTEilANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It AIL 
•Remodeling 

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Decks & Additions 

ill Work Very Well Bone 

FRIEESTIIIAATESiCML 
Miai537-M39 



44 Lakttland Nawspapert 



Friday, February 14, 1992 






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Area wrestlers shooting for invites to state finals 



A familiar move here, a laie comeback 
there, and peaking at the right time ail 
helped area wrestlers advance to the Bar- 
rington sectional this weekend 

Finals, with berths to the state meet at 
stake, begin at 6 p.m. Feb. IS. 

Libertyville. by winning the Stevenson 
regional, Johnsburg by winning the 
Woodstock regional both advance to the 
team competition while Lake Zurich and 
Antioch advanced by finishing second 

Waukcgan won the Antioch regional 
with 174.5 points, followed by Antioch's 
150.5. Round Lake, which held second 



^^^^SS?^^^ 







RESTLING 



ROUNDUP 



place for a while, was third at 122.5. 
Grayslakc was fourth at 87, Grant fifth 
with 82 and Warren sixth and Zion-Benton 
brought up the rear. 

At Stevenson, Libertyville won with 
193 points, making it a battle for second 
place. Highland Park lopped Carmel 131.5 
to 123 while Mundelein was fourth, Lake 
Forest fifth, Stevenson sixth and North 
Chicago last 

At Hcrscy, Lake Zurich was second with 
121 points, edging third-place Barrington 
by two and one-half points. 

"That's what we expected. Round Lake 
is a fine team and we lost to them in du- 
als. All three of our guys (title winners 
Greg Zlalapi at 103, Tim Lchn at 160 and 
Tom Lchn at 171) have an excellent 
chance to go downslate," Antioch Coach 
Ted DcRousse said. "We were eight-for- 
nine in the finals and that feels good to 
finish strong." 

Tuesday's match with Waukcgan was the 
first time Antioch advanced in the dual 
portion of post-season. 

"Dan LaBarbera (145) has looked 
especially strong. Kevin Krakowski 
(171) , lost to Mike Fcightner of Carmel 
early in the year and Reed Chrislensen 
(189 pound champ) earned two pins," 




Next stop, Barrington 

Round Lake's Ray Deatherage is in control during his 112 pound match with 
Waukegan's Lynelle Wakefield. Deatherage advanced to Barrington sectional 
with the title at the Antioch regional. Area wrestlers who qualified out of region- 
als will battle for state bids at Barrington sectional Feb. 14 and 15. - Photo by 
Joe Shuman. 



Libertyville Coach Dale Eggcrt said. 

Gaining double revenge was 
heavyweight Brian Murken. Murken 
lost to Willie Norman of Mundelein 
twice, but shut him out 6-0 in the final. 

"The match seemed to play into 
Murken's hands," Eggcrl said. 

The Wildcats faced Highland Park in the 
team regional, awaiting the Lake Zurich- 
Hersey winner. 

Grayslake's Mike Kearby and War- 
ren's Dave McLellan are the best of 
friends, and had a chance to get to know 
each other's moves through summer tour- 
naments. But it was a familiar result when 
the two clashed at 125 pounds, with 
Kearby winning in a 1:48 pin. 

"It's been my best season by far," 
Kearby said. 

"They're very good friends. Mike is a 
very dedicated wrestler and a hard woriccr. 



He (McLellan) got a Htde high and Mike 
took advantage of it," Grayslake Coach 
Jon Peterson said. 

It took a comeback for Jeremy 
Carter of Warren to top Kareen SpUIman 
of Waukcgan 6-2. Carter was trailing 2-0 
until he scored a near fall and reversal. 

"I tried to play it cool and see what I 
could get in terms of points," Carter said 
of the comeback. 

"He's been picking it up since Christ- 
mas," Warren Coach Mark Tiffany said of 
Carter. 

Carter had a rough time of it as a 
sophomore, then had to overcome elbow 
injuries. "All the stuff he had learned as a 
sophomore, he put to use. His experience 
has really helped him." Tiffany said. 

Grayslake's Curt Onstad had another 
battle on his hands with Round Lake's 
Gary Bailey at 140 pounds. He won 1 1- 



7, after the match had been tied 6-6. 

"They know his style and they were 
trying to block on him. Bailey wrestled a 
pretty smart match," Peterson said of On- 
stad. 

Onstad, 34-1, had lost his unbeaten 
status earlier in the week. 

Zalapi started the night with a default 
win over Joe Keams of Grayslake. Rams 
Coach Jon Peterson said Keams was in- 
jured earlier and was being saved for sec- 
tionals. Tim Lehn won at 160 over 
Travis Davis of Waukcgan 4-3. Tom won 
at 189 in a technical fall in the final sec- 
ond over BenBubeck of Zion-Benton. 

Ray Deatherage of Round Lake 
pinned Lynelle Wakefield with 25 seconds 
left in a tense match. Also earning titles 
for Round Lake were John 
Keaskowski, with a pin over 
Waukegan's Ed Gyrol at 3:07 at 130 
pounds and Rusty Nofsinger, who won 
a 6-4 decision over Rick Johansen of 
Zion-Benton in overtime. 

At Stevenson, Flavio Morales of 
Mundelein downed Jaime Quijda of 
Highland Paric 10-9 at 103 pounds. Eric 
Browne of Mundelein, who lost his un- 
beaten status to Warren's Carter at confer- 
ence, won the 199 pound title with a fall 
in 1:17 over Tasos Maroulis of Liber- 
tyville. 

Derick Noble of Carmel won at 112 
pounds with a fall over the NSC champ, 
Brian Paul of Stevenson, in 1:59. Also 
winning a tide for CHS was Chris Per- 
litz at 152. He downed Liberty villc's 
Neil Calanca 10-3. 

Libertyville sophomore Bob Paulson 
came into the meet 6-8, unseeded at 135 
pounds. He also gained a second, losing to 
Carmcl's Jamil Swift in a fall in 3:32. 

Stevenson's highlight came at 140. 
Alex Neiman, the NSC champ, won 
over Ryan Greene of Lake Forest 8-3. 
Neiman won an overtime tilt against 
Greene at conference. 

At Hersey, Lake Zurich's Al Strobl, 
the defending stale title winner at 160 
pounds, won at 171 by a pin. Scott 
Calacci was second at 145, Dan Rote 
second at 135. Nich Tsiakls was third at 
189. 



Girls hope to capture that post-season magic 



The pictures on the wall are fading now. 

The videotape of the supersectional win 
over Rockford Boylan at Round Lake may 
be wearing thin, the mob scene at the 
court, the comeback from the early 10- 
point deficit. The photos on the wall are - 
beginning to yellow. 

Warren Twp. High School and the rest 
of the girls basketball teams will be 
shooting for that post-season glory which 
came to Warren on a certain February 
Monday in 1988. Warren beat Boylan that 
night, 61-54, advancing to the Elite Eight 
for the first lime. They gave a credible 
showing against Chicago Marshall, up by 
five at half lime, before fading. 

"If there are any kinks in there armour, 
you let the rest of us know," Grayslake 
giris basketball Coach Brad Larson said, 
jokingly, of this year's 21-2 Blue Devils. 

Warren was poised to wrap up another 
North Suburban title Feb. 13 at Fenlon 
before the "real thing" of the playoffs 
started against North Chicago Feb. 17. 

"They arc very talented and deep and 
well-coached," Uu^son said. 

Regional finals, at the sites of the high- 
est seeded teams, will be Feb. 20, with 
the sectional semis and finals at Round 
Lake Feb. 25 and 27. Next step is the 
Maine West super-sectional Feb, 27, a 
place and time Warren faithful try to for- 
get 

Warren should have no trouble with one- 
game winner North Chicago Feb. 17, but 



the most interesting matchup on the first 
night could be Lake Zurich, the 13th 
seed, at No. 4 and Northwest Suburban 
Conference champ Round Lake, or 
Carmel at No. 8 Grant. Grant, led by 
Janclle Bullman, has been fighting to 
stay above the .500 mark, is 12-11. 



^1 

BE 



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OOPS 



by Steve Peterson 

Carmel is 9-13 heading into its confer- 
ence tournament. 

One team licking at the chops should be 
Libertyville. The Wildcats arc the third 
seed, opening the tourney hosting Anti- 
och Feb 18, 

Sophomore Sarah Weiss has put to- 
gether two strong games - 20 points in a 
72-31 win over North Chicago and 18 
points in a win over Carmel. 

"Sarah has started to use die backboard 
more. She was more of a natural perime^ 
ter player but she is doing a nice jnh 
making the conversion," Libertyville 
Coach Tom Muiphy said. 

Weiss made 10 of 20 shots and hauled 
down 16 rebounds against the Warhawks 
in three quarters. Sophomore Kelly 
Karl has shaken off an injury, and is 
teamed at guard with Erica Chung. 
(Continued on page 46) 




Providing tough defense 

Ubertyville's Erica Chung (20) tries to stop a Carmel player from dribbling past. 
The Wikicats are the third seed in the Round Lake seGtional complex , while 
Carmel is ninth. Camnel Is at Grant Feb. 17 In the first round while Ubertyvllle 
hosts Arrtkxjh 17. - Photo by Joe Shuman. 



Frlday.February 14. 1992 



Lakokind Newspapon 45 









Lakeland's SPORT 



|.,I P |„. -^.-J. - - I I .J ■ lJ.■ML.. >l ,■k-J-Ui--JS ' ,i^W-^.^-.- ' -.' ^ ^^i--TvJ g;aL^,■J^f1;^jj'.-? 

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Kessers outlook bright as spiker at Western 111. 



After setting many 
Mundelein High School 
volleyball records in a four- 
year career, Shauna Kcssel 
decided to dedicate her winter 
time sports efforts to 
improving her skills. 

Participating in a Crystal 
Lake volleyball club paid 
off for Kessel, as she signed 
a national letter of intent to 
attend Western Illinois 
University in Macomb. 

"I like her values and I got 
along great with the team," 
Kesscl said of WIU Coach 
Julie Kartel. 

Meanwhile, Courtney 
DeBolt, of Stevenson, 
signed with Michigan Slate. 
DcBolt helped the Patriots 
to two state quartcrfinalists 
as the Pats have become a 



volleyball powerhouse. 

Kessel said she liked the 
emphasis on athletics at the 
rural campus. She plans on 
pursuing a career in social 
work. 

"All the schools that 
contacted her said the skill 
and talent were there and she 
could step in. The club 
volleyball helped her a lot 
with more exposure," 
Mundelein volleyball coach 
Dan Szymkowiak said. 

Kessel holds the 
Mundelein High career 
serving record of 390 
points, 697 for 754. Her 
1991 and 1990 seasons are 
the benchmarks for MHS 
players in attack, with 566 
for 628 in 1991 and 495 for 
590 last year. She had 315 



kills last year, 253 the year 
before, the top two 
individual seasons. For her 
career, she has 706 kills, far 
outdistancing second place 
Rachel Lackie, who had 
355. 

Kessel made the all- 
conference volleyball team 
last year. Mundelein was 
20-15-1, losing to 
Libertyville in the regional 
final. 

When the family gathered 
to have Shauna sign the 
letter of intent at a cere- 
mony last week, sister 
Kandi and brother Kyle may 
have been wondering what it 
was like to be recruited The 
Kessels are hoping this 
trend continues. 




Basketball report 



Warren 66, Antioch 31 
Grant 67, Johnsburg 64 
Marian C. 60, Round Lake SO 
Grayslake 62, Wauconda 52 
UbertyvUle 52, 
Fcntoo 49 (2 OT) 
Stevenson 88, Mundelein 67 
Carmcl 65, Si, Viator 49 
Richmond-B. 60, Hampshire 58 
Lake Forest 61, 
Libertyville 59 (OT) 
Caimcl 48, Loyola 47 
Wanen 72, Mundelein 55 
Lake Zurich 68, Hampshire 40 
McHcnry 55, Lake Zurich 50 
Fenton 70, N. Chicago 54 

Scores by quarters 

Cannel 11-18-16-3-48 
Uyola 14-13-11-9-47 
Hampshire 12-8-7-13-40 
Lake Zurich 10-19-24-15-68 
UbertyviUe 8-14-13-18-6-59 
Lake Forest 14-8-14-17-8-61 
Mundelein 10-16-11-18-55 
Warren 15-12-17-28-72 
Zion-B. 16-9-21-17-63 
Stevenson 19-22-30-18-89 
Fenton 9-10-8-10-5.7-49 
UbertyviUe 12-10-13-2-5-10-52 
Grayslake 7-12-16-27-62 
Wauconda 7-21-11-13-52 
Round Lake 19-13-4-14-50 
Marian C. 9-17-13-22-61 
Johnsburg 12-20-17-15-64 
Grant 12-25-11-19-67 
Carmcl 13-17-21-14-65 
St. Viator 18-7-13-11-49 
Stevenson 21-32-15-21-88 
Mundelein 18-3-18-28-67 



Games this week 

Friday, Feb. 14 

Lake Zurich at Jacobs, 7:30 p.m. 
Burlingtn C at 
Richmond-B., 7 p.m. 
Grant at Round Lake, 7 p.m. 
Marian C. at Grayslake, 7 p.m. 
Wauconda at Johnsburg, 7 p.m. 
Stevenson at 
Libcnyviilc, 7:30 p.m. 
Warren at Zion-B., 7:30 p.m. 
Saturday, Feb. 15 
McHenry at Grayslake, 7 p.m. 
Lake Forest at 
Stevenson, 7:30 p.m. 
Mundelein at 
N. Chicago, 7:30 p.m. 
Libcnyviilc at Warren, 7:30 p.m. 

Standings 

Big Eight Conference 

Conf. All 

W L W L 

Marengo 8 13 6 

Burlington C. 6 1 11 7 

Gcnoa-K. 5 4 7 11 

Hampshire 4 5 9 10 

Harvard 3 6 4 15 

Richmond-B. 3 6 4 15 

Huntley 7 1 18 

Northwest Suburban Conf. 
Conf. AH 

W L W L 

Marian C 12 18 3 

Round Lake 8 4 11 10 

Johnsburg 6 6 13 8 

Grayslake 5 7 8 13 



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Grant 


4 8 


6 


16 


Wauconda 


1 11 


4 


15 


North Suburban Conf. 






Conf. 


All 




W L 


W 


L 


Stevenson 


12 


19 


1 


Warren 


10 1 


16 


4 


Lake Forest 


6 6 


9 


12 


Antioch 


5 6 


8 


12 


Fenton 


5 5 


8 


12 


Mundelein 


5 7 


10 


10 


Libertyville 


5 7 


9 


■12 


N. Chicago 


2 9 


5 


15 


Zion- B. 


2 10 8 


13 


East Suburban Cath. Conf. 




Conf. 


All 




W L 


W 


L 


Sl Joseph 


10 


20 


1 


Man St 


9 2 


19 


3 


Carmcl 


7 3 


15 


7 


St. Patrick 


6 4 


9 


12 


Sl Viator 


5 5 


9 


12 


Noire Dame 


5 6 


15 


7 


lollet Cath. 


4 6 


11 


10 


Benct 


3 8 


7 


14 


Marian Cath. 


3 7 


8 


12 


Holy Cross 


11 





19 


Fox Valley 


Conference 




Conf. 


All 




W L 


W 


L 


Dundcc-C 


10 1 


16 


5 


Crystal L S. 


8 3 


13 


8 


Crystal L C. 


6 5 


7 


12 


Lake Zurich 


5 6 


11 


U 


Woodstock 


5 6 


7 


12 


McHeniy 


5 6 


7 


14 


Cary-G. 


3 8 


9 


13 


Jacobs 


2 9 


7 


13 



Signing on 

Mundelein glr(s volleyball player Shauna Kessel signs a national-letter-of-Intenl 
for Western Illinois University. Looking on are: coach Dan Szmykowiak. Back 
row, mom Renee and father Dennis Kessel. 

Girls baslcetball 



(Cont'd, from page 45) 

It is the second time in a 
week the two teams will 
have played 

Stevenson Coach Frank 
Mattucci believes, yes, you 
can have fun in girls 
basketball these days, even 
when playing the league 
leader which is gunning for 
another title. 

That was the direction he 
took when he substituted 
players at the end of a 51 — 
39 loss to Warren. The 
defeat dropped Stevenson to 
13-10 overall, 8-8 in league 
play. 

"I made the first move. I 
wanted my kids who were 
stniggling U> sit and watch 
to see what these girls were 
doing wrong and help them. 
It is a lesson I picked up at 
New Trier. It's time to start 
to let them play. They 
tried," Mattucci said. 



He acknowledged he got 
frustrated in the final quarter 
as Warren extended a four- 
point lead to 17. That's the 
kind of run Warren has been 
known to use in Uie post- 
season as well. 

"We knew it would be 
tough to come out of here 
with a win in this place. I 
did not want my kids to 
come out of here thinking 
'we're no good'. That's not 
true. "This will only get us 
better for regionals and our 
goal now is to come home 
with a regional plaque. 
That's a neat goal to shoot 
for and a realistic goal," 
Mattucci said. 

Marelene Elfering 
came in off the bench for 
Warren to score 18 points, 
providing the 'Devils with 



another outside shooting 
weapon. Jul! a one 
Frankowski, whose 
conHdence continues to 
build, pumped home 20 
points. 

Stevenson, the seventh 
seed, hosts Highland Park 
Feb. 18. 

In other games, 
Mundelein, the ISth seed, is 
at No. 2 Waukegan. In the 
only non-area game, Zion- 
Benton hosts Lake Forest 

Getting back to Grayslake, 
Larson is pleased with the 
team's progress toward an 
13-9 season. The Rams, 
sixth seed, are expected to 
have leading scorer 
Allison Waldenstrom 
back in the lineup when 
they host Deerfield Feb. 18. 



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Friday, February 14, 1992 



h,^ .. 




Lakeland's SPORTS 



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14.1992 




rant, Richmond enjoy thrills of close victories 



One might call the two toumament The kids really 

[games The Thrillers Along needed that win," Richmond 

iRte. 12.' Coach Scott Brunswick 

For one Friday night, a said. 




season of frustration came 
to an end as both Grant and 
Richmond experienced 
thrilling wins. 

For Grant (6-16» 4-8). it 
was a 20-foot three-pointer 
by Lou Notriano which 
notched a 67-64 win over 
Johnsburg. Up Rte. 12 
apiece, with a right turn on 
Rte. 31, and one could catch 
the Richmond Rockets in 
celebration as well. 
Sophomore Jeff Toler hit 
the winning shot with one 
second left for a 60-5S win 
over Hampshire, 

"It was a great win. The 
kids jumped off the bench 
like we had won the state 



by Steve Peterson 



Neither team is a factor for 
the race for second in their 
respective leagues, and the 
wins only give them a 
combined 10-30 record. But 
for fleeting moments, that 
did na matter. 

Richmond (4-14, 3-6 in 
the Big Eight Conference) 
had to have a key hoop by 
Ray Wilkenson to tie 
the game at 58 with 14 
seconds left Wilkenson and 
Toler both had 19 for the 
winners. 

"We were happy to get a 
shot off and then thrilled we 
had a chance to win. Lou 
banked it in. We felt we 
were deserving after what 



PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

UNCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE VIEW 

SCHOOL DISTRICT #103 

The Board of Education of the Lincolnshire-Prairie 
View School District #103, Lal<e County, Lincolnshire, 
Illinois, will receive sealed bids until 2:00 P,M. local time, 
February 28, 1992. in the Business Office, 1370 
Riverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois for Lawn and 
Grounds Maintenance. 

At 2:00 P.M., all bids that are received will be publicly 
opened and read aloud in the Business Office. 

All prospective bidders are required to review said 
specifications and requirements prior to submitting their 
bid. Bid specifications may be obtained through the 
Business Office, 1370 Riverwoods Road. Lake Forest, 
Illinois 60045. 

All bids must be accompanied by Certificates of 
Insurance and such other documents as required in the 
specifications. 

Where applicable and appropriate, the general 
prevailing rate of wages in Lake County. Illinois shall be 
paid for each craft or type of workman or mechanic 
needed to execute the contract or perform such work. 

Sealed bids shall be addressed to Lincolnshire-Prairie 
View School District #103, Business Office, 1370 
Rivenwoods Road. Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

The Board of Education reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids and to waive any informalities in 
bidding. 

Judith Weber, Secretary 

Board of Education 

Dated this seventh day of February, 1992 

0292B-366-GEN 
Febmary 14. 1992 




HOST A BOOK PARTY 

Speclalizeid title selection 
including award books. 
Hostess gift. Games & prizes. 

Write: BOOKS, Box 388, 

Ingleside, IL 60041 

or call 587-6456 



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we had gone through," 
Grant Coach Tom Maple 
said. 

"We wanted him 
(Nortiano) to bring the ball 
up the floor to see what he 
could create." Maple said. 
"Johnsburg did a nice job of 
defense, lliey had two guys 
in his face and he made it" 

Notriano. who missed the 
first third of the season due 
to illness, has been espe- 
cially valuable since the 
Bulldogs lost guard Steve 
Richford to injury. 

Johnsburg (IS-iS. 6^ used 
full-court pressure to force 
Grant turnovers late. Erich 
Hoffmann scored 24 
points, John Molnar had 
14. "We could not stop 
him. He gives us fits," 
Maple said of Hoffman. 

The win makes it two in 
one week for Grant, which 
downed Wauconda 68-59, 
completing a three-game 
swcqp. Nels(Mi Anderson led 
the way with 12. "Brian 
McNally came off the 
bench and scored 10 points 
and had several assists and 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF LETTING 

Sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of 
the Clerk, Lake Villa 
Township until 10:00 am 
f^^arch 6. 1992 at which 
time they will be publicly 
opened and read for a 
mosquito abatement 
program for the Villages of 
Lake Villa and Linden- 
hurst and Lake Villa 
Township. Proposals shall 
be submitted on forms 
furnished by the Township 
and shall be enclosed in a 
sealed envelope marked 
"Mosquito Abatement 
Program' and addressed 
as follows: Ted Restarski, 
Lake Villa Township Cler1<, 
37908 N. Fairfield Rd., 
Uke Villa, IL 60046. TTie 
right is reserved to reject 
any and all proposals and 
to waive technicalities. 
Dated February 10. 1992 
By Order Of: Sue Hanson, 
Supervisor 
0292B.375-GEN 
February 14, 1992 



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Friday, February U, 1992 



steals," Maple said 

Richmond tried to make it 
a weekend sweep, but fell to 
Palymiera Eagle of 
Wisconsin, 78-73. Gardner 
had 34 points and Toler had 
another strong game, 23 
points and 13 rebounds. 

Grant battles, second-place 
Round Lake away Feb. 14 



while Johnsburg hosts 
Wauconda. 

Round Lake (U-10, 8-4) 
fell to Marian Central 60-51 
as the Hurricanes chalked up 
their first conference title. 
Round Lake led by 17 
points, only to see the 
home team turn the tide in 
the second half. 



Pat Lejman scored 23 
points for Round Lake, 

whose outside game was 
realtively shut down. . " 
Pat played one of his better 
games of the year," Ward 
said. 

Round Lake beat Grant by 
four, then by 17 points. 



CLC sets coaching course 



The college of Lake 
County will be offering an 

American Coaching Effec- 
tiveness Program on March 
10 and 17. 

The eight hour class will 
meet from 6 to 10 p.m. 
both nights at the CLC 



Physical Education Center, 
room 706. 

Cost is $54.38, including 
books, $33.28; registration 
fee, $16,10 and lab fee, $5. 
Textbooks and materials arc 
available at the CLC Book- 
store or can be purchased at 
the clinic. 



To register, call the CLC 
registration office at (708) 
223-1111. The class is 

listed as PED 242-961. For 
more information, call the 
Physical Education Center 

at (708) 223-6601, Ext. 
475, 




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Lakeland's SPORTS 



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Patriots top seed 

North Suburban's rich continue to get richer 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The powers of the North 
Suburban Conference stayed 
that way last week as 
Stevenson and Warren's 
boys basketball teams con- 
tinued to distance them- 
selves from the "Little 
Eight". 

Both teams swept confer- 
ence weekends as Wairen 
(16-4, 10-1) crushed AnU- 
och 66-31 and Mundelein 
72-55. Stevenson (19-1, 11- 
0) brushed away Mundelein 
88-67 and Zion-Benton 89- 
* 63. With six games left, 
thu'd place Lake Forest is a 
distant 6-6 in loop play. 
Antioch and Mundelein, 
which had been competing 
for third, have fallen into 
the mid portion of the 
NSC. 



"When you're into the 
game, you don't realize 
what is happening. You're 
looking for the little 
things," Stevenson Coach 
Ken Johnson said. 

What the "big thing" was 
all about was a 32-3 run by 
the Patriots against 
Mundelein which turned a 
two-point game to a 30- 
point blowout. The host 
Mustangs never knew what 
hit them. 

Chris Coleman, who 
could be back in the starting 
lineup when Stevenson 
battles Libertyille Feb. 14, 
scored 21 against Mundelein 
and 20 against Zion-Benlon. 

Coleman got plenty of 
help. Jason Justus had two 
strong games, 14 against 
Mundelein and 17 against 
Zion. Eric Roth led the at- 



tack at Zion with 24 points 
after 12 against Mundelein. 

Despite the growing lead, 
Johnson has a healthy re- 
spect for the Wildcats, 
whom they host Feb. 14. 

"They've got a good club 
and their guards have been 
playing steady for them," 
Johnson said. "We're still 
looking to improve. We've 
seen a lot of improvement 
in the last few weeks," 
Johnson said. 

Warren look charge of 
both games with strong 
second halves. The 19-3 run 
did the trick against Anti- 
och. Craig Shelton led the 
way with 17 points. Anti- 
och, led by 12 points from 
Chris Malec, hosts North 
Chicago Feb. 14. 

Mundelein gave Warren a 
scare for three quarters and 



held a two-point lead when 
Kyle Kessel hit an outside 
jumper with 2:52 left 

But the Mustangs went 
silent, and Ben Bongratz 
then took over. The Warren 
senior scored six straight 
points to allow Wanen lo 
pull away as Mundelein was 
held to one shot 

Bongratz finished with 25 
points, all in the second 
half. 

"We started to play a lot 
better on defense and we got 
the ball inside," Warren 
Coach I>arrel Bader said. "I 
was pleased with the way 
we played in the second 
half." 

The game marked the 
third start for Justin Hanlin, 
who had 13 points and led 
. Warren with mne rebounds. 

"I thought they were ripe 



Panthers advance 7, 
salvage NWSC share 



by GREG MILLER 
Lakelaod Newspapers 

Round Lake's wresders didn't make the 
cut for the team portion of the state tour- 
nament at last Saturday's Antioch re- 
gional, but the Panthers did cop a share of 
their conference's tide after all. 

Seven Panthers — including three 
champions — advanced to Friday and Sat- 
urday's sectional at Bairington. 

Round Lake's three champs were Ray 
Dcatherage (112), John Keaskowski (130) 
and Rusty Nofsingcr (140). 

Also advancing were Mike Kukla 
(diird at 103), Justin Zdeb (Uiird at 125). 
Gary Bailey (second at 135) and Luke 
Tesch (second at 171). 

Waukegan took the team title with 
174.5 points, while Antioch (150.5) was 



second. Round Lake (122.5) and Grayslake 
(87) were Uiird and fourth. 

Round Lake did grab a share of its 
third straight Northwest Suburban 
Conference title after the league meet in 
Woodstock Jan. 31. 

The Panthers were at first declared the 
winners of the meet, but when scoring er- 
rors were discovered, Johnsburg was 
named the tourney champ. 

Round Lake, however, was undefeated 
in NWSC dual meets, which entiUed Uiem 
to share the title witii Johnsburg. 

"We won Uie dual meets, and Johns- 
burg won the tourney," Round Lake coach 
Bob Curran said. "The only way we could 
have lost the tiUe is if we placed third in 
the conference tourney — then we 
wouldn't have won it." 



Wrestler, coach to tell 
views on girls wrestling 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newpapers 

When LibertyviUe 
wresUer MaragretLeGates 
appears on the talk show 
hosted by Maury Povitch, 
not all on the panel will be 
of the same view. 

For a Warren Twp. High 
School wrestling coach and ' 
wresUer will be offering 
other views about 15-year- 
old girls competing on 
mats. Those involved will 
be flown to New York this 
weekend for the show's 
taping. 

"I don't think girls should 
wresUe. It's always been a 
sport specifically for 



guys," Jason Aaron said. 

Aaron, age 18, will be on 
the show with Warren 
High Coach Mark Tiffany. 
Aaron wresUed at 145 and 
152 pounds fw Warren this 
year. 

"I don't think a guy could 
go 100 percent against a 
girl. We're brought up to 
be nice to girls, but in 
wrestling to show no 
mercy," Aaron, a Gumee 
resident, said. 

Aaron has been wresding 
for six years. 

"The show asked for 
someone who felt it would 
not be in the good. There 
seems to be a lot of 



confusion as to how to 
handle it," Tiffany said. 

"My point is not against 
Maragrct, but if girls 
should be able to wrestle 
competitively against guys 
at that age level," Tiffany, 
a life fitness teacher at 
Warren, and former state 
wiesding champ, said. 

Warren did not wrestie 
LeGates in a conference 
dual meet but did in a 
Waukegan tournament. 
Tiffany explained junior 
varsity meets are considered 
exhibitions. 

LeGates wresties at 103 
pounds and beat a Carmel 
wrestler this year. 



Corsairs look for home win 



Paced by two strong 
games from senior point 
guard Chris Mohr, 
Carmel's boys basketball 
team completed a three- 
game road win streak with 
two victories last week. 

The Corsairs (15-7, 7-3 in 
the East Suburban Catholic 
Conference), notched a 65- 
49 win over St Viator in 
league play then held on 
for a 48-47 win over Loy- 
ola. Carmel returns to 
Mundelein for a Feb. 14 



game against Joliet 
CaUiolic. 

Mohr scored 25 points, 
including a three-pointer, 
against St Viator, then had 
16 agauist Loyola. 

"Chris had a good week- 
end because he is passing 
the ball well and working 
hard on defense," Carmel 
Coach Scott Rosberg said. 

The Corsairs used an 1 1-0 
nm against Loyola at the 
end of the tiiird to pull 



away. Mohr, who is aver- 
aging 13 points a game, 
had one of his five three- 
pointers in the spree. Mohr 
hit four Uiree-pointcrs in 
that game. 

"We're doing OK, but we 
will have to do better if 
we're going to have any 
post-season success," Ros- 
berg said. 

The Corsairs were widiout 
Dan Devito, out to Feb. 21 
with an ankle injury. 



for the picking. But Oiey're 16 points in the second 

a good club and we got overtime. Sriver had 21 

caught shortiianded some- points in the losing effort 

times," Mundelein Coach against Uie Scouts. 

Dennis Kessel said. There were no surprises in 

The key shot was an un- the seedings tiiis year for 
likely off-balanced tiiree- Uie Waukegan regional, 
pointer (debateable from Uie There was good news for 
Mundelein point-of-view) Grayslake, which probably 
by Shelton. That turned a won't have to play Steven- 
four-point lead to seven af- son. as it did last year. That 
tcr Uiree quarters. The lead honor could go to Grant, 
grew lo 21 before Uie subs Uie 16Ui seed. Stevenson 
finished Uie game. (19-1) is lops, followed by: 

The winner for Uie most- Highland Park (18-3), War- 
exciting weekend award has rcn (16-4) Carmel (15-7), 
to go lo LibertyviUe. The Waukegan (11-10), Deer- 
Wildcats split Uie Uirillcrs, field (10-10) Mundelein 
beating Zion-Benton 52-49 (10-10), Lake Forest (9-12), 
in double overtime but los- LibertyviUe (9-12), Round 
ing to Lake Forest 61-59 on Lake (1 1-10), Lake Zurich 
a buzzer beater. (11-11), Antioch (8-12), 

The Wildcats (9-12, 5-7) Zion-Benton (8-13). NorUi 

topped Fenion as Matt Chicago (5-15), Grayslake 

Sriver tallied seven of his (8-13) and Grant (6-16). 




Rebound battle 

Mundeleln's Rob Bma (50) seems to have the upper hand in this rebound battle. 
Teammate Cory Kirking tries to lend a hand against Warren's Ben Bongratz. 
Bongratz scored 25 points as Warren won 72-55. - Photo by Joe Shuman. 

Gymnasts set for sectionals 



Carmel will continue its quest for a 
state team title, while several area 
individuals will try to advance to state 
during Uie section^ at Stevenson Thurs- 
day. Feb. 13. 

Corsair coach Norbert Bendixen 
said his squad will gets one of its toughest 
tests yet in a field that includes teams 
from Palatine, Buffalo Grove. Rolling 
Meadows and New Trier. 

Still, Uie could prevail, Bendixen said. 

"It's very well possible. TTic scores are 
there and our performances are up. Obvi- 
ously, all the talk in the world doesn't 
matter until you perform." 

Three Carmel gymnasts qualified for 
the sectional all-around: Eme Cole, 
Sarah Mikrut and Jaime Wegener. 
OUier Carmel qualifiers include Jenny 
Logue and Bea Selz. 

Host Stevenson will send Elana Patt 



and Amy Citron into the competition, 
while Sara Schieffer and Taryn 
Mantucca will represent LibertyviUe. 




BRFECT IDs 



by Greg Miller 



Jenny Snell, who was second in Uie 
all-around at Uie Dcerfield regional, will 
be Mundelcin's lone representative. 

Antioch's Jenny Allen, Jessica 
Kane and Brandi Houle advanced to 
Uie Schaumburg sectional. Allen Uiird on 
Uie vault and bars and fifUi in Uie all- 
around, while Kane and Houle made Uie 
cut as at-large entries. 



^■^ 



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4d Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. February 14, 1992 



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MWw«iiBiwtw»g'»»'i ij-'n; ri"""' 



Linden Barber Shop 



Linden Plaza - Grand Ave 

Lindenhurst, IL 

(708) 356-0679 

John Miller-Board Member ofLC.B.A. 

"Good Luck 
During The Tournament! " 




^ 






yCongTatuCations to a[[Lal<:e County^ 
Tournament (Bou/fers!" 

BiLLER Press 

966 Victoria • Antioch 

(708) 395-1203 
FAX (708) 395-4232 ^ 



Above: Emilio Perez, President of Association 
weicome's Bowiers to the 63rd Annuoi Lake 
County Bowling Association Tournament. 



ik. 



BERTRAND 
BOWLING LANES 

2616 Washington • Waukegan, IL 
(708) 244-1300 

Best of Luck 
Bowlers! 







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35 N. Rt. 12, Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-1490 

•Automatic Scoring -Lounge •Proshop 

Re-Opening in March! 
Now forming Summer & Fall Leagues 

'•GOOD LUCK!** 



Above: Edward Zelesnik, Secretary-Treasurer who 
has been on board for 41 years and In present 
position for 35 years, announces over $16,000 
total prize fund will be awarded in this year's 
Tournament. 






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from $475 

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Antioch, IL 



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MANOR 






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STANDINGS 




'WHO SAYS I CANT BE FOUND" 



Frank & Martha's Tile, If^c, 



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(4 Doors W. of Waukegan H.S.- Washingion ai Jackson) 

Otfico: (708) 623-0854 Home: (708) 355-3512 

FAX: (708) 623-9403 

Mobile: (708) 533-2186 Beeper: 1-800-402-3426 

MON., TUES,. FRl.-fl:30 AM-5 PM 

WED.-8:30 Ah/^Noon THURS. 8:30 AM-S PM SAT. 8:30 AM-3 PM 

SUNDAY - CLOSED (By Appointment Only) 

For Your Contfenlence-We have 24-Hour Answorirg Satvico and 

Beeper Syslom lor immadiate he^ or inlormolion 



1st TEAM #4 

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Good Luck Botvlers! 



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LOW IN THE MONEY 



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BRUNSWICK VBUIELEfiCiUES 

League Package #Z 

For The Low Price of 
$8.75 per week Includes: 

Three games ol league bowling each week 

$1 ,000 lirsl place prize ^^^S:5&^'' 

End oj season butlet ^*'^*^-^'''^ r^.^ii*^.. 

Brunswick achievement awards 

Bonus Club membership 

Open bowling discounts 

Prize money for every team $50.00 minimum 

End of season trophies or plaques 

League record keeping service 

Bowling parly certilicales 

Rhino bowling towel for all bowlers. 

Handicap %- 90% of 210 Type ot Season - split 




Xui-i' 










FIRST PLACE $1,000.00 
K^^ GUARANTEED 

BRUNSWICK UfKEHURST BOWL 

(across from Laketiurst Malt) 
(708) 473-2600 



j'MFrlday, February 14, 1992 



Lakotand NfiwspaiDers 49 



.'.'^WjW^f-rwi 



^ST^^SSssssss^fttiiiftraaift.'.aTa^ 






COUNTY NEWS 



Area students 
named to 
-dean's list 

The Univ. of Wisconsin- 
Parksidc has announced the 
names of the students in- 
cluded on the dean's list for 
academic achievement dur- 
ing the fall semester. 

Those having an aca- 
demic grade point average of 
3.9 to 4.0 arc: 

Jacalyn Kalmes, Lori 
Slager, Karen Williamson, 
Lisa Lindgren of Lake 
Villa; John Miller, Marilyn 
Hlinak, and Marlccn Bozi- 
mowski of Lindenhurst; 
Michael Lawrence and 
Brcnda Belkc of Antioch. 

Reserve for 
craft show 

The Lindenhurst Park 
Dist. is sponsoring their 
fourth annual "Spring 
Fling" craft show on Satur- 
day, May 2 from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m. at Bj. Hooper 
School. 

Grafters interested in re- 
serving a space may call the 
park district office at 
(708)356-6011. The space 
fee is $20. Application 
deadline is April 4. 



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PRICES AND COUPONS IN THIS AD EFFECTIVE THRU SUNDAY, FEBRUARYjMjg? 



f RESCRIPTI^ PRIGIN© 



WE WILL NOT U UNDERSOLD ON ANY PRESCRiniON 



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S^OffPrescriptionDnigs | 

. Good on any new or Umisferred prescription. - Not valid for «ny insunuiocprogram or 
. If prescription is under SS.OO, U's FREE. prescriptions Iranrferred from any oUier 

One coupon per person per vJsL Reliable Dnig Store. 

-Valid thru 3/16/92 



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FOOT 
PAIN? 



Call Dr. l^e Tka 
and A8$ociate8 
for a FREE no 

cant cotuuhationl 

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(7M)SJ^2^ (708)872-8722 

(414)6544516 

PIsAse mention odi wlMiSrt 

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"cood 
Neighbor service 
makes State Farm 

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my poljcyiiolders 

swear by it 

year after 

year. 99 



PHILIPS 
DIREQOR 

40, 60,75 
OR 100 WATT 

LIGHT 
BULBS 

BUY ONE AT 3.83^ET ONE 




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POLAROID 
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59 




FACIAL TISSUE COFFEE FILTERS 



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HUGGIES 
PiJLL UPS 

8 



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COVER GI RL 

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ALYSSA ASHLEY 
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894 Hillside, Antiocii 

395-1089 



WHITMAN'S 

SAMPLER 



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RUFFLES AND FLOWERS 

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State rarm is there. 



50 Lokokind fjowspaport 




Friday, February 14, 1992 



I 




'■'"•— •■^■t'-'^-''1 



Lakeland Newspapers 



raveling, youth, indoor soccer sign-ups nearing 



IDLES 

10 



ochures arc now being accepted at our lifeguard certification 

Winter/spring brochures the Viking Park Registra- 

now available at the tion office. Registrations 

rnec Park Dist. for residents of the Gumee 

igisu^tion Office, Wanen- Park Dist, and the Warren 

[ewport Library, Gurnce Twp. High School DisL are 

llage Hall, Warren Twp, now being processed daily 

nter, Park City City on a random basis. Resident 

Eall, Wads worth Village and non-resident registra- 

1 and the Wildwood Park tions will be processed daily 

ist. The brochure has a on a random basis, with 

|.j/Mimbcr of programs for all residents receiving priority, .^h^h^^ 

■- 'es and interests. Be sure Due to our Feb. 2 Special Dist,_offers American Red 

pick one up if you In-Pcrson Registration, Cross Lifeguarding and El- 

ven't received one, some classes may be filled lis & Assoc, Lifeguard 

lliigool programs or have limited openings. Training Register soonl 

'^ Registrations for Gumee Lifeguard certification Spring break 

rk Dist. pool programs In April, we will offer During spring break, 



March 30 to April 3, the 
courses. This will be the Gumee Park Dist. is offer- 
last opportunity to become ing fun programs and 
certified for summer em- activities, as well as an ex- 
ployment. The Gumee Park panded spring break schcd- 



Park 
Happenings 




;.nf 





200 a 



Showing self-portraits 

Woodland Dist. 50 parents had a chance to see what their students do during 
the school day at an open house. Mom Jill Manderinot, left and her daughter 
Britany join Tara Joyce and her mom, Sandy. Students are showing moms 
their "sett-portraits". 



ule. Keep your kids in the 
swim of things over spring 
break. 
Soccer - 

An instructional pro- 
gram in indoor soccer is 
being offered for youths in 
grades kindergarten to third. 
Participants are taught the 
basic skills involved in this 
fast-paced sport, what a 
great way to get ready for 
the spring outdoor soccer 
league. Program begins 
Feb. 29 and concludes 
March 21. Register soon, 
kids love this program. 
Youth soccer league 

Resident In-Person 
Registrarion is Saturday, 
Feb. 15 from 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m. Residents are those 
who live in the Gumee Park 
Dist. and/or Gumee Grade 
School Dist. 56. Beginning 
Feb. 17, all resident drop- 
off or mail-in soccer regis- 
trations will be processed 
daily on a random basis. 
Beginning Feb. 22, all 
resident and non-resident 
registrations will be pro- 
cessed daily on a random 
basis, residents receiving 
priority. 
Traveling soccer teams 

The Gumee Park Dist, 
is now accepting registra- 
tion for its U16 (under 16 



years of age) and U19 (under 
19 years of age) soccer 
teams. These u-aveling soc- 
cer teams compete against 
area youth soccer teams, 
call Ron for details. Regis- 
tration for these teams are 
only open to students grades 
nine through twelve. 

First aid course 

Feb. 25 and 27, 6 to 10 
p.m. is (he next class for 
you to become certified in 
first aid. You must attend 
both evenings to receive 
certification. Get your cer- 
tificate now so you*rc pre- 
pared at work or home. 

Basketry 

Create one of the most 
beautiful Easter baskets ever 
at our next Basketry class, 
Saturday, March 14. If 
you'd like to see the actual 
basket, stop by the Viking 
Paric registration office for a 
peck. All supplies arc pro- 
vided, but please bring a 
sharp knife, wire snips and 
scissors. 
Pasta making class 

Leam how to make and 
cook pasta from Jerry 
Reizner, the chef from 
Saluto's Pizza and Pasta 
Restaurant, on Wednesday, 
Feb. 26 from 7 to 10 p.m. 



While you're at it, sign up 
for Jerry Reizner's upcom- 
ing classes on Oriental 
Cooking on March 18 and 
Italian Cooking (sauces and 
more) on March 25. 
Ballroom dance 

Bring your best guy or 
gal, (or just yourself) to our 
Ballroom Dance class. 
You'll leam the basic steps 
of fox trot, polka and the 
swing. "Special requests" 
will also be taken during 
this four week workshop. 
Fee per person is 
$18/resident of the Gumee 
Park Dist., $23/non-resi- 
dent. The next class is 
March 23 to April 13. Pre- 
registration is required. 

Cross country skiing 

If you know how to 
cross country ski and look- 
ing for a new place to go, 
join the Gumee Park Dist. 
when they travel to Old 
World Wisconsin on Feb. 
23. Trip includes 
transportation and maps of 
marked scenic ski trails. Fee 
is available with or without 
ski rental. 

For more information 
regarding these and any 
oilier program, contact the 
Gurnce Park Dist. at 
(708)623-7788. 



WARREN HIGH SCHOOL SNOWBALL, '92 

SAYS 

'THANK YOU" 

TO THE FOLLOWING GENEROUS 
CONTRIBUTORS 



! I 



K50Z. 




'ALENTINE 

;es 

'COLO WITH AIMONIK 

19 



9 01 




PAT A LITTLE NOW 
SAVE A LOT UTER! 

LaVerne's Catering 

offers you 

10% Off any party 

(any date during 1992) 

booked diiring February 

with a 25% deposit. 

LaVerne^s Catering Inct 

Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 546-5700 or (708) 587-9797 

Division Of Michael Industries 



f^ Presents ^^ 
THE RUNNER STUMBLES' 

by Milan Stitt 
Directed by Mark Badlke 

A gripping courtroom drama; a deeply 

moving tale of repressed passion asks us lo 

look at our traditions. 

Feb. 14, 15, 16.21,22,23,28,29 

and March 1 

Friday & Saturday 8:00 p.m. 
Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults *8.00 
Students & Seniors *6.00 

For Reservations 395-3055 

FM & L Theatre • 877 Main St. • Antioch 




GRAND SPORTING GOODS 

GURNEE AMERICAN LEGION POST 771 

GURNEE BREAKFAST EXCHANGE CLUB 

GURNEE V.F.W. POST 3899 

HARRIS BANK LIBERTYVILLE 

INQUIRY MANAGEMENT SERVICES 

J.J. HENDERSON & SON 

J.W. SMITH PRINTING 

JERRY HAAPANEN 

JOEL KENNEDY CONSTRUCTION CO. 

KIMBERLY FINANCIAL SERVICES 

MARSH FUNERAL HOME 

PAPA ONIO'S RESTAURANT 

SUPERIOR PERSONNEL EMPLOYMENT AGENCY 

VERNA ROCHELEAU 

WARREN NEWPORT CREDIT UNION 

WELTON'S COUNTY MARKET 






"We're Your Type 



ft 



Hours: 

Monday thtu Frklay 

6a.m.to'4:30p.ra 

Sat. 6 BLm.-12 p.m. 



(708)395-4111 

(708) 395-1203 

Fax. (708) 395-4232 



|)»("tlC>\' 



ANTIOCH 6 

, >i| M □ 



IS YOUR PRINTER 

HOLDING YOU UP? 

Help is on It's way. 

FAST, AFFORDABLE PRINTING 

is RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. 




966 Victoria • Antioch 




There's A 

Song In 

Our Hearts... 

Because we're happy 

to know such fine 

folk like you! 

Happy Valentine's Day. 




Sales 

Service 

Lessons 



:SOU] 

• Rentals 



•Starter Packages 
•Gift Certificates 



(708) 223-7979 




FOOT 



tf^ 



Call Dr, Lee Tua 
and AstocitUei 
for a FREE no 

cost consult€Uian! 

(7tll)6e2^)«0 (414)7S»«K) 

f Anibch Zten 

0d}9ftS^^ (7t»)972^722 

(4t4)6544$1fi 
n««M ttientian «d vrbcB 
,^. ,ismkingyoar.Bppt. . 



Friday, Februaiy 14, 1992- 



txikoland Newspapers 51 



hriian/ M. 1992 



■.-.TeMt^-, 



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)ardmare 



WKHtiAT loaaioHS 
. TO smi ioo BmeKi 

•ROUND UKE 
HOME CENTER* 
UBERTYVILlEj-^ 
GilRNEE. 
ROiiP lAKE BEACH 

mundeleIn 

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lie INTERIOR 
lATEX PAINT 

Ptai^MAUl rSEMI-OlOSS 1 

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eusroM coiofts *2.oo 

F^ttA PER 0AUOH 



Available in white and \2 
colors. One coat coverage. Siain 
resistanl and washable. 



Available in while and 10 
colors, 1 coat covefs. No 
yellowing, slain resislanl. 



32 6AU0N 

TRASH CAN 

ONlvCoO 

^^^ REG. 10.88 

Blow molded construction. 

. Durable and tough lor years ot 

wear. With tight lit lid. 




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Hardware 



BOHUSCOUROH 



I THIS BONUS COUPON 
I GOOD FOR 

1 «1 OFF 

* Any purchase ol $5 or more at 
any of our 6 locations, 

.ROUND UVKE .LIBEflTYVILLE 'GURNEE 



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LIMIT 1 BONUS COUPON 

PER CUSTOMER 

NOT VALID WITH ANY 

OTHER DISCOUNT 

COUPON GOOD THRU 

FEB. 25, 1992 

SALE ITEMS, CIGARETTES, | 

LOTTERY AND ■ 

UTILITIES EXCLUDED. | 

.Dnnun i AKF RE ACH *M"N DELElN^«LAKEHUR S 1^^^ 



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Hardware 



THIS BONUS COUPON 
GOOD FOR 



«1O0FF 

Any purchase oi $50 or more at 
any o( our 6 locations. 



BONUS COUm 




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aUCE 



Hardware 



THIS BONUS COUPON 
GOOD FOR 



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LIMIT 1 BONUS COUPON 




OFF 



Any purchase of $25 or more at 
any ot our 6 locations. 




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I .ROUND LAKE .UBERTVVIILE .aURNEE,nmiH^^«»C>^^ 



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LIMIT 1 BONUS COUPON 

PER CUSTOMER 

NOT VALID WITH ANY 

OTHER DISCOUNT 

COUPON GOOD THRU 

FEB. 25, 1992 

SALE ITEMS, CIGARETTES, 

LOHERY AND 

UTILITIES EXCLUDED. 



Hardware 



PER CUSTOMER 
NOT VALID WITH ANY 
-. ... m^' , -^i... OTHER DISCOUNT 
4t 0^ ACC • ^H^ COUPON GOOD THRU 
^m^ HWW m::i:-' ^^^^ FEB. 25, 1992 

SALE ITEMS, CIGAREHES, 
LOTTERY AND 
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.'round U^KE .L1BERTYV.LLE -QURNEE TroUND LAKEB^^UNDE^H^^l^Tj 



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ROUND LAKE .UDERTYVII^LE .QURNEE 



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PER CUSTOMER 

NOT VALID WITH ANY 

OTHER DISCOUNT 

COUPON GOOD THRU 

FEB. 25, 1992 

SALE ITEMS, CIGAREHES, 

LOTTERY AND 

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•ROUND UVKE BEACH •MUNDELEIN .I^KEHURST 



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DAILY8;30-9 

(Lakehurst Opans At 9 AM) 

SATURDAY TILL 6 
SUNDAY 9 TILS 

We rasefvo (^t) fiflht 10 lifnil 
QU»nlUI«s and correct printlflO 
ertore. All robates aubject to 
ni»nu1«tCtur*r8 stIpOlatlonv 




Friday, February 14. 1992 



52 Lakoland Nowspapors 



J 






^Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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1-9 

AI9AM) 

FILL 6 
TILS 


^1 to »mit 
ct priming 
subject to 

atlona. 





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Columnist learns inside- outs of Gumby suit wear 



rrr: 



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: v:."'""'^SSasB»P, ■''•;' ". 



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Waukegan 
simulated a rescue. - Photo by Bob Hoover, Wauconda Rre Dept. 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

I can think of more relaxing things to do 
on a Sunday aflernoon, early in February. 

Watching one of the 16 episode's of 
"The Andy Griffith Show" shown on Su- 
pcrBowl Sunday comes to mind. Or 

Town Watch 



watching the NBA become the NDA — 
No Defense Allowed — for the basketball 
league's all-star game and Magic Johnson's 
great show. Or perhaps taking in a 
movie. 

Crawling on the icy waters off Gowe 
Beach in Gumec nonnally doesn't make 
the Top 10. Yet, with some reassuring 
from friends of various fire departments in 
Lake County, there I was, in a triangle- 
shaped cut of water in the ice in a bulky 
Gumby suit 

"All the bodies of water with the lakes 
and streams we have in Lake County, and 
with many of them in near-drowning tem- 



peratures (below 70 degrees) most of the 
year, that's why dive rescue is so impor- 
tant," Steve Onisa of the Gurnee Fire 
DepL said. 

Orusa will be training members of the 
Gumce Fire Dept. on water rescue tech- 
niques, using both the Gumby suits and 
an ice water rescue suit Some have fins. 
He explained the Gumby suit is an 
encapsulating device. "They're baggy; 
that's what gives it the bouyancy," he 
said. 

Tim Tanner served as dlvemaster for the 
exercise. 

"I was pleased with the job done by the 
training officers. It will be a real benefit to 
all who paiticipaled," Gumee Fire Chief 
Tim McGralh said. 

When there is a drowning or water 
rescue situation, the resources of all 
county departments are called upon. 
Firefighters were represented by such de- 
partments as Antioch, Waukegan. Fox 
Lake, Wauconda, Spring Grove, Winthrop 
Harbor and Zion. The Gumce Park Dist 
gave its blessing for the use of the big 
pond behind Warren Twp. High School. In 



April, the Lake County Dive Rescue team 
will be working on a public safety suba 
diving course. 

"It's designed so one size fits all," Dave 
Harmon, a paid-on-call member of the 
Gumee Fire DepL, said. Harmon said he 
felt comfortable in the suit That includes 
six-foot-three inch firemen and five-foot- 
seven inch repoiter. 

In addition to being certified as an ice 
rescue specialist, the day meant some fun 
competition. The 34 firefighters split up 
into teams, seeing who could be the first 
to complete the 150-fcet crawl out to the 
ice hole, rescue a "vicUm" and bring the 
victim back to shore quickly. 

The winning time was 43 seconds plus, 
completed by Mike Streid and Alex Dim- 
itrivjtch of Zion, Dan Wright of 
Waukegan, John Popel of Spring Grove, 
Have Waldeck of Winthrop HarbOT and Jeff 
Van Fallen of Antioch. 

As for your reporter — (would be) fire- 
man, the crawling on all fours became 
easier as the 150 feet of ice got closer to 
the water hole. I had to block out my 



long — standing fear of water though, when 
Orusa said to spin around and go in the 
water. The feeling was surprisingly safe 
inside the suit I couldn't crawl back to 
shore then, (and face the firefighters at the 
next drill or bumdown) so, with all the 
experts around, I felt I was in pretty good 
hands. 

Ken Cashmore of Waukegan Fire Dept, 
carefully attached a device which would 
eventually push me out of the water, re^- 
suring your scribe he would not sink. A 
couple of waves to Bill Hoover of the 
Wauconda Fire DepL, who was manning 
the camera, and your's truly was gliding 
along the ice, even managing another 
wave or two, as shcH^e neaied. 

Next year, though, I think Sundays well 
slick with TV re-nms. 

The returns are in. From high 
school cheerleaders to school board mem- 
bers to the staff at village hall, all liked 
the new look sported in the Jan. 31 edi- 
tions of " Lakelife". Don't forget, you too, 
can gain a new image. Call Lakeland at 
(708) 223-8161 for the details. 




Fun to come 

Fun Harbour mascot Willy the Peklcan takes the easy way out while 
owner/developers Jim Persino, left, and Marc Klibanow, right, assist 
Waukegan Mayor Haig Paravonian with the official groundbreaking of Fun 
Harbour, a 4.1 -acre, nautical-themed family enlertalnment center scheduled 
to open In Waukegan this spring.— Photo by Rob Milowski 



United Way installs 
officers, board members 



Victory Hospital offers support 



Every Wednesday at "Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. Overeatcrs Families Anonymous sup- 
Anonymous support group port group meets in the 
meets at Victory Memorial Adolescent Chemical De- 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan pendency Conference Room 
Rd., Waukegan. Also on at the hospital. Alcoholics 



Anonymous meets every 
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at 
the hospital. 

No registration is re- 
quired. Call (708)360-4090 
for further information. 



The United Way of Lake 
County installed its new 
Executive Committee and 
Board of Directors at the 
annual business meeting 
Jan. 16 at the Country 
Squire. 

After nominations were 
made and passed, Teresa 
Hall Bartcls, vice-president 
of Manpower Temporary 
Services and United Way of 
Lake County Chairman of 
the Board, introduced the 
1992 Executive Committee 
and Board of Directors. 
Newly elected officers arc: 
Vice-Chairman of 
Administration is Donald 
M. Peterson, The Benefit 
Trust Life Companies; 
Vice-Chairman of Alloca- 
tions is Gary Gardner, Bax- 
ter Healthcare Corp.; Vicc- 
Chairman of Campaign is 
Stephen Smunhwailc, Ab- 
bott Laboratories; V ice- 
Chairman of Marketing is 
Ken Jackson, IBM Corp.; 
Vice-chairman of Planning 
is Emmctt L. Moore, Sr. 
Allstate insurance Co.; 
Vicc-Chalrman of Volunteer 
Leadership Development is 
Sybil Yasirow; and Chief 
Professional Offi- 



cer/Secretary is Elizabeth 
Jan Edgar, United Way of 
Lake County. 

Additional Executive 
Committee members arc 
Neal Anderson of the 
Chicago Bears, Publicity 
Chairman and Kenneth W. 
Farmer of Abbott 
Laboratories, Immediate 
Past Chairman. At-large 
members are: Linda Hess, 
Lake County Clerk; RADM 
James W. Partington, Great 
Lakes Naval Training 
Center; and Shelia Melton. 
Bands and jackson were 
elected to serve a second 
term on the Board of 
Directors along with the 
following individuals: C. 
Richard Austin, IMC 
Fertilizer, Inc; Ron 
■Crawford, Commonwealth 
Edison; Ken Haas, 
Underwriters Laboratories; 
Timothy O'Lcary, Country 
Estate Developers; Elise 
polcnz, Poienz Corp.; ^d 
Dan Struble, Abbott 
Laboratories. Individuals 
elected to serve a fitsl term 
on the Board are: Arthur 
Collins, Jr., Abbott 
Laboratories; M. Blake 
Ingle, IMCERA. Inc.; 



Barbara LaPiana, Village of 
Lincolnshire; Eve B. Lee, 
Eve B. Lee and Assoc; 
Randy murphy, County of 
Lake; John B. Scott, 
Kemper Life Insurance Co,; 
and Thomas J. Schwartz, 
First Midwest Bank, N.A. 

Community services 
volunteers were also 
recognized at the meeting. 

Through its annual 
campaign and its volunteer 
support, the United Way of 
Lake OCunty is able to 
support 45 agencies offering 
99 programs toone in three 
Lake County residents. For 
more information about 
United Way of Lake County 
or local volunteer 
opportunities, call the 
United Way office at 
(708)816-0063. 

Name honors 

Ray College of Design 
honored students that were 
placed on the dean's list for 
the fall semester. Honored 
students arc Karoi Inno- 
cenzi of Gurnee; Patricia 
King of Kildeer; Tracy 
Duddleston and Susan Zer- 
rien of Vernon Hills. 



ary 14. 1992 



Friday, Fobiuary 14, 1992 



lokokind Howtpapwi 53 



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I 2 M !? » 9 B 7 K •« P P « K • 't-H r r» E Ti ■» r " J S ? a. - r •■ 



■ r 11 3 ^ "s V M 



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S3il 



Hoppy Valentine's 

Day Ivar! 

1 vish you only rosier 

days ahead! 

God will answer soon- 

Arlenc 

^/? ^ff %^ ^^ fc^ ^^ %^ ^r ^r^ 

^ Hey ^ 

^ Guitar Man, ^ 

w^Yoa can ploy*/^ 
^ ma a tunc ';^ 

any time! 

LovQ you! 



Buick, 

Wishing my 

Valentine a special 

day! Are you still 

my Valentine or 

has someone else 

got your heart? 






s- 



^ 

w* 

^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 



<^ 



^^ ^^ ^^* ^/^ ^r ^r %^ ^r^ %^ 




Katie Rose, 

To a very special 

little lady. 

We love you. 

Mommy & 

Daddy & Cassie 

too. 




Nancy. ^\ 

Only you! 

All my love, 

always & 

forever. 

bill 




Keith (Pork Chop) 

and the Five Little 

Pork Chops. 

You guys ore the 

greatest! You give me 

so much love and hope 

and happiness 

everyday. My life 

would be so empty 

without you. I thank 

God every day {or 

keeping us all together. 

I love you alll 

Tina 

(Middle-Age Mom) 

\i To Sue B, ^ 
3 Thanhs far U 

1^ the wna ^ 

U Weehend! ^ 
g Happy g 
g Valentine's g 

M °'*^ 1 

M hove always g 

^ Me ^ 



Happy Valentine's Day 

to the most important people 

in my life-my parents! 

You are the Best! 

xo xo xo xo 

You are loved and 

appreciated so much more ^t<; 

than you'll ever knov\r! 

¥ Love 

Leticia 



Even though 
you're too cool 

for Valentine's, 
Hope you are sttll 

my Valentine 
cnywayl 



Happy Valentine's 
Day SweatheartI 

Love, 

Hubby 



W Honey, 11 
I know things are 

really rough 

around here but 

still want you to 

know I still love 

you. 

Me 

Does this get nne 
dinner "out"? 



K 



J 



rt 



BILLY AND PAULIE 

V^Ve gone ONE-ON-TWO, you both and I- 

Had a few TOUCHDOWNS along the way. 

But you're still my ALL-STAR favorite guys 

And before I WIND-UP, I just want to say 

You're both NUMBER ONE this 

VALENTINE'S DAY! 
All My Love, Vanilla Atlila 

Thb viloilinc cnlitlnyou biHh ihe plHsure o( liking mc «il for in 
crening(i(fincdining- 



■a 



« 



'Even tkrougfi 
fiecidc times, you're 
stiCCmxj ^aCentinej 

LoVBj 

!}oAnn 



To my friend, my 

lover, my Bwcclheart, 

my husband 

Happy Valantma^t Day 

I lovo you! 

Your tcifo 




r ^appy ^ 

Vakntint's Tiay 

I Love youf 
'Deantta-9^e(issa 

^mnifer-Stepknk 
Tm- Chris 



To Randy and Nflte, 

Happy Valentine's 

Day to my ttvo 

favorite guysl 

^ Mom 



Sean Albert 

May 

WIIO LOVES 

YOU BABY?! 

I Love you. 

Mo 



«E2) gsiCLO 

%psts aren't ahuays red 

Sind viokts aren't 

Tea(Cy Blue., 
'Bat tfitrc's one thing 

Wtresureof, 

^We'd always (ovc yoiiU 

'Kpiift, Tma, ^nddy, Sissy, 

9^itftie, ^c(<:y & Mictxatt 




MICHAEL- 

MEven Lhough things are rougfi^ 

^' right now, just remember, I 1m 

will ALWAYS love you! 

Ail ray love, 

5ren- (f^' 



Happy 
^Valentine's 

Day, 
; Baby! ; 

^ All my love« ^ 
V Kate M 

MDM- 
God speed your 

love to me - 
feels so right - 

you are my 

everyday - love 

you so. 

^ Denis. ^ 

To count the 
reasons that I 
love you vjoM 
be too many to 
make a list. 

So I'll soy the 
words 'I love 
you' to let you 
know that 
you're thebesti 

Happy 
Valentine's Day! 






^ 



3 





Stop by and 
watch my heort 

beat faster! 

Happy 

Valentine's Day! 



¥ green, *Kipe or ¥ 
JJ Stuffed- 2 
JJ Lettuce be J 
Jl ^aCentines! „ 
^ ^ou've bean tfte^ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 



^ greatest Mom 
^ ever! 
¥ CfouTH^otnato 
Grandtna Daphne. 5?_2f'^^II?< 
You will always be 
my Valentine. 
XOAOAO 
Katie Qose 



/5 






W 



3 



1 



V 
V 



Sue 



JP. 



^ferdspringer^ 

l(u topiary tnt unlttd, 

dit catnip is dead, 

ifit pitta Sones are maidy 

andSianze sUeps on ifu. Std, 

'Livis is bammed, 

atwtfierday out 

and the ?{pTton andL\ivie are 

ptajpn£ wild their 'mouse' 

Tfit animals alt, thy iovt their 

mom, and'Daddoes too, cause 

you'nnumSeroae. 



V 
V 



Ray, 

I lovQ you 

with all my v 

hoart. Happy ^ 

Valentine's ^ 

; D^yi 5 

jj Love Hlwoys, J 
^ Danielle m 

Happy Valenime's 

Day 

Hubby! 

•F Love, 

Wifey 




Valentine's 
nay 

To My Very 

Special Mom! 

With Love, 

Arlene 



\ 



W 



Happiest of all 

Valentine's Days 

to my special 

family 
I love you all 

Love, ^ 



1 wanted my Valentine to rhyme 

so I sat down to pass some time. . 
Writing a little bit here and there, 

but not really getting anywhere 
But you'll never know that this is for you 

unless I leave you a little clue 
To my man. Old Styled, Orange and Blue 

I only love you, (and Jessi & Jaci too!) 
V¥¥V¥V¥V¥ 



6her 



Donny^ 

OurLmU 

SporUmatu 

Happy 

V'Day! 

. -. Love v-x 

Mom& 



A year of fun 
A year of changing 
A year of helping 
A year of caring 
A wish for 
more years 
to share- 
Happy 

Valentine's Day 

Michael 
Love, 
•^ Rose 



To My 
Fisherman, 
We bye ya! 

Happy 

Valentine's 

Dayl 

Love, 

Patty, ficruffy. 

^amantha <£f 

Kecna 






DAD OtoeUy Gallo> 

For 33 years you've 

been my hero, you're 

Tazan, Superman and a 

little Sinatra alUnonel 

We alt need you and 

love you verymuchi We 

don't know what we'd 

do v^lhout you. 

Love. 

Una. Keith, Freddy. Sissy. 

Keithle. Rocky & 
^^y Michael 



Happy 

Valentine's Day 

to my #1 and 

only son 

Love, Mom 



To My Sweet. 

Delicate, 

Tender 

Fair Family- 

Glenda, April, 

Enn& 

Ashley... 

Happy 

SiValentine's; 

Love, 

Jilm 



You look exceptionally 
handsome today, 



That color Is good for you! 
Happy Valentine*! Day 
toourFAVQQITE 
Valentine..7 . . 

Ivove and kisses 

Sandy. Babe, Sue BeU. 

Sue B., Roselle, Sharon,- 

Brenda, Patty, Smttty. 

Rox, Tammy & Murph 

12 




54 Lakokind Nowspapon 



Friday, Fobniary 14, 1W2 



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•90 GEO TRACKER 4x4 $"1095 

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•86 NISSAN 4x4 P/U*..*4995 

«5995 
$2250 
^2250 



'87 FOBD F150P/U 

XLTLinil. m; 

•85 CHEVY V4 TON 4x4 
wmpto* 



•56 CHEVY DUMP TRUCK 

S ton. «wd toodilion 



SPORTY CARS 

'66 FORD MUSTANG LX $3450 
5t?(J,4ejl,p»,p^ •^«*w 

'88 MEBCUHY COUGAR LS^^ 

Bai i»iijn MUc<v.told«>. $9950 

fhcvroof^ new, l^^ •■■■■- »-•*«»■■* 

■86 CHEVY CAMARO BEflUNEHA 

V9,iir.wh>.pi.pfwte ' $3995- 
ev^iiwt .,.....,.-. '■ ■ *' *" 

'88 CHEVY BEBETTA 

PI. pb. (»« *tow»f 

'88 CHEVY BEREnA GT 

S tpd, VB, AJC, tau £ft*w. c*w. . . - 

•84 KISSAH700SX ; 

S IpU. UH. win. fUIWOf. CM*. . .. 

'91 CHEVY CAMARORS 
&Md.v&wcp<,pi.i«p*. $1 A 950 

tortd.. .- ■'''''''' 

•87 CHEVY CORVETTE 

CONVDmBU.*ulo,"o*l«^ SAVE 

!>«■ llfM, BHiSl »»• <#■•■» 

•89 TOYOTA CAMRY LE $099C 

Auto, V«, •unreol, te»« %»^^'» 

•91 PLYMOUTH lASEfl 

Auto,ACem,«e»e*. 
lew maw 



W50 

«6995 

*2575 



M0,995 



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•*»iooo do^n rasft cr trade 9.9 APR. 60 mo., tax. ^^.'^.,..,k-..-::^ 




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Frlday.Fobruary 14, 1992 



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1 & 2 Betlrcioiii Apte. - From ^4^5 



OFFERING TliE ADVANTAGE OF QUlE;r COUNTRY LIVING, 

CONWENIENCE OF QUALITY SHOPPING, 

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OF RECREATION JUST MINUTES AWAY. 

YOU'VE SEEN THE REST, IT'S TIME 

TOSEETIiEBEST 

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 



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ANTIOCH 
ANOR 





«( 



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Apartments 



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AFARTMENTS 

A Place You Can Call Home! 



'Downtown' 
Anttoch 



Route 173 



Hwy. 83 & North Avenue 

Antioch, IL • 395-0949 

Evenings By Appointment 




GoodC«nt>ltAW«tl 

Built Energy Efllclsnt 

Horns 



56 LakQlqnd fOowspaporc 



Friday, Fobruary 14, 1992 






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